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Science

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Anthropology, archealogy, Arts and Culture , History

One of the Most Significant Etruscan Discoveries in Decades Names Female Goddess Uni

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Archaeologists translating a very rare inscription on an ancient Etruscan temple stone have discovered the name Uni -- an important female goddess.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Demography, Climate Change, History, Social And Behavioral Sciences, Urbanization

The demise of the Maya civilization: Water shortage can destroy cultures

Something really drastic must have happened to the Ancient Maya at the end of the Classic Period in the 9th century. Within a short period of time, this advanced civilisation in Central America went from flourishing to collapsing -- the population dwindling rapidly and monumental stone structures, like the ones built at Yucatán, were no longer being constructed. The reason for this demise remains the subject of debate even today. Model calculations by TU Wien may have found the explanation: the irrigation technology that served the Mayans well during periods of drought may have actually made their society more vulnerable to major catastrophes.

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University of Washington Paleontologists Discover Major T. Rex Fossil

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Paleontologists with the University of Washington's Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture have discovered a Tyrannosaurus rex, including a very complete skull. The find, which paleontologists estimate to be about 20 percent of the animal, includes vertebrae, ribs, hips and lower jaw bones.

Science

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archealogy, Electromagnetic, History, New World

High-Tech Imaging Reveals Precolonial Mexican Manuscript Hidden From View for 500 Years

Researchers from the University of Oxford's Bodleian Libraries and from universities in the Netherlands have used high-tech imaging to uncover the details of a rare Mexican codex dating from before the colonization of the Americas. The newly revealed codex, or book, has been hidden from view for almost 500 years, concealed beneath a layer of plaster and chalk on the back of a later manuscript known as the Codex Selden, which is housed at the Bodleian Libraries. Scientists have used hyperspectral imaging to reveal pictographic scenes from this remarkable document and have published their findings in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports.

Science

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Plasticity, Fossil Record, Anthropolgy, Jaw research, Evolution diversity

Reinterpreting the Fossil Record on Jaws

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Scientists use the fossil record to make judgments on the physiology and behavior of species. But are those interpretations correct? New research from the University of Notre Dame puts into question how we interpret the behavior of extinct organisms from their fossil remains, and the greater role of plasticity in determining evolution diversity.

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Arts and Humanities

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Roman, Albania, Archaeology, Submerged, Harbour, Peter Campbell, Amphora, Tegulae

Expedition Finds Remains of Fortified Roman Port Are Much Larger Than Previously Thought

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An international team, co-directed by a University of Southampton archaeologist, has made a significant discovery at an underwater location in Albania – revealing that the submerged remains of a major ancient fortress and port are far larger than previously known.

Science

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Anthropology, archealogy, art and culture, Astronomy, History, Space And Planetary Science, New World

An Ancient Mayan Copernicus

For more than 120 years the Venus Table of the Dresden Codex -- an ancient Mayan book containing astronomical data -- has been of great interest to scholars around the world. The accuracy of its observations, especially the calculation of a kind of 'leap year' in the Mayan Calendar, was deemed an impressive curiosity used primarily for astrology.

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Olympics, Culture, History, Politics

Quagmire of Politics, Power, Science, Individual Agendas, and History

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UMToday reached out to the Dean of the Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, Douglas Brown, for his take on the 2016 Rio Olympics for an op-ed piece.

Science

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Evolution, primate evolution, mouse lemurs, Strepsirrhini, Haplorhini, adapoids, omomyids, Fossil Bones

Twenty-Five Little Bones Tell a Puzzling Story About Early Primate Evolution

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A cache of exquisitely preserved bones, found in a coal mine in the state of Gujarat, India, appear to be the most primitive primate bones yet discovered, according to a new analysis.

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Law and Public Policy

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Law, History, legal history, Common Law, Sir William Blackstone, blackstone, indigenous peoples, Land Rights

Legal Commentaries Continue to Make an Impact, 250 Years On

A four-volume work that has never been out of print for the past 250 years is still making an impact on the modern world's legal thinking.

Science

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Earth Science, Paleontology, Evolution

How Did Primate Brains Get So Big?

Virtual brains reconstructed from ancient, kiwi-sized primate skulls could help resolve one of the most intriguing evolutionary mysteries: how modern primates developed large brains.

Science

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archealogy, History, old world

Britain's Last Hunter-Gatherers Discovered Using Breakthrough Analysis of Bone Fragments

Archaeologists from the Universities of York, Cambridge and UCL have identified rare human bones from the UK dating to the Late Mesolithic era (around 4000 BC, just prior to the arrival of farming in Britain) using an innovative new bone collagen analysis technique.

Science

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Space Weather, Solar Storms, satellite communications, Cold War

Space Weather Expert Available to Discuss Impacts of Solar Storms Re: 1967 Solar Storm Nearly Took US to Brink of War

Medicine

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Making Cancer History, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Kenneth Cooper, Jeanne Phillips

Living Legend Luncheon to Honor Kenneth H. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H. In Dallas

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The 27th annual A Conversation With a Living Legend® in Dallas, Sept. 28 at the Hilton Anatole, will honor Kenneth H. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., founder of The Cooper Clinic and The Cooper Institute.

Medicine

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archealogy, old world

Sensational Grave Find in Cypriote Bronze Age City

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An archaeological expedition from the University of Gothenburg has discovered one of the richest graves from the Late Bronze Age ever found on the island of Cyprus. The grave and its offering pit, located adjacent the Bronze Age city of Hala Sultan Tekke, contained many fantastic gold objects such as a diadem, pearls, earrings and Egyptian scarabs, as well as more than 100 richly ornamented ceramic vessels. The objects, which originate from several adjacent cultures, confirm the central role of Cyprus in long-distance trade.

Science

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Stone Age, Neolithic, Tools, Anthropology

Research Reveals Effectiveness of Stones Thrown as Weapons by Stone Age Hunters

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Stone objects collected by prehistoric hunters were effective as throwing weapons to hunt animals, research at Leeds Beckett University reveals.

Life

Education

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Academic Boot Camp, Warrior-Scholar Project, Military Veterans

Academic Boot Camp Helps Soldiers Transition Into Students

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To help veterans and military personnel transition into the academic world, the University of Chicago is participating in the Warrior-Scholar Project for the second year in a row.

Science

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Wild Horses

U of S Scientists Probe the Mystery of Sable Island’s Growing Wild Horse Population

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SASKATOON - University of Saskatchewan (U of S) biologists have made a significant advance in understanding the ecology of Sable Island and its iconic wild horses—one that underscores how intimately connected living systems are.

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Arts and Humanities

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Henry James, U.S. Postal Service, Stamps

Henry James Stamp Included in U.S. Postal Service Literary Arts Series

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A commemorative stamp for American writer, Henry James, was released by the U.S. Postal Service on July 21. James is the 31st inductee in the U.S. Postal Service's Literary Arts Series.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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UTSA Center for Archaeological Research Reimagines the Alamo

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Members of The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) Center for Archaeological Research have teamed up with other archaeologists to study the Alamo and its grounds as part of the process to develop a master plan for the historic landmark.







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