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Why Lizards Have Bird Breath

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Biologists long assumed that one-way air flow was a special adaptation in birds driven by the intense energy demands of flight. But now University of Utah scientists have shown that bird-like breathing also developed in green iguanas – reptiles not known for high-capacity aerobic fitness. The finding bolsters the case that unidirectional bird-like flow evolved long before the first birds.

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Tooth Serves as Evidence of 220 Million-Year-Old Attack

At the beginning of the age of dinosaurs, gigantic reptiles—distant relatives of modern crocodiles—ruled the earth. Some lived on land and others in water and it was thought they didn't much interact. But a tooth found by a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, researcher in the thigh of one of these ancient animals is challenging this belief.

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Tooth Buried in Bone Shows Prehistoric Predators Tangled Across Land, Sea Boundaries

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Before dinosaurs, it was thought the top aquatic and terrestrial predators didn't often interact. But researchers at Virginia Tech and the University of Tennessee discovered that the smaller of the two apex predators was potentially targeting the larger animal.

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Dinosaur Family Tree Gives Fresh Insight Into Rapid Rise of Birds

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The study shows that the familiar anatomical features of birds – such as feathers, wings and wishbones – all first evolved piecemeal in their dinosaur ancestors over tens of millions of years. However, once a fully functioning bird body shape was complete, an evolutionary explosion began, causing a rapid increase in the rate at which birds evolved. This led eventually to the thousands of avian species that we know today.

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Scientists Report First Semiaquatic Dinosaur, Spinosaurus

Scientists today unveiled what appears to be the first truly semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus.

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Shrinking Dinosaurs Evolved Into Flying Birds

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A new study led by an Australian scientist has revealed how massive, meat-eating, ground-dwelling dinosaurs − the theropods − evolved into agile flyers: they just kept shrinking and shrinking, for over 50 million years.

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New Feathered Dinosaur From China Sheds Light on Dinosaur Flight

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Research findings from an international team of scientists uncovers details on how a new species of a feathered raptorial dinosaur found in China provides evidence on how large-bodied dinosaurs took to the air.

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What a 66-Million-Year Old Forest Fire Reveals About the Last Days of the Dinosaurs

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As far back as the time of the dinosaurs, 66 million years ago, forests recovered from fires in the same manner they do today, according to a team of researchers from McGill University and the Royal Saskatchewan Museum.

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Oldest Pterodactyloid Species Discovered, Named by International Team of Researchers

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An international research team, including a George Washington University (GW) professor, has discovered and named the earliest and most primitive pterodactyloid—a group of flying reptiles that would go on to become the largest known flying creatures to have ever existed—and established they flew above the earth some 163 million years ago, longer than previously known.

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Hunting Our History

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Fossil dinosaurs, animals and plants being found in southern Utah that are distinct from those found farther north in rocks of the same age are telling a new story about the end of the age of dinosaurs in Utah. That is the topic for “Dino Hunters” – a feature article in the current issue of National Geographic Magazine.

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