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How the Darkness and the Cold Killed the Dinosaurs

Climate scientists now reconstructed how tiny droplets of sulfuric acid formed high up in the air after the well-known impact of a large asteroid and blocking the sunlight for several years, had a profound influence on life on Earth.

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Dinosaur Eggs Took a Long Time to Hatch; This May Have Contributed to Their Doom

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New research on the teeth of fossilized dinosaur embryos indicates that the eggs of non-avian dinosaurs took a long time to hatch--between about three and six months.

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Research on Dinosaur Embryos Reveals That Eggs Took 3 to 6 Months to Hatch

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New research on the teeth of fossilized dinosaur embryos indicates that the eggs of non-avian dinosaurs took a long time to hatch--between about three and six months.

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Dinosaurs, Embryology, Reproduction, Extinction

How Long Did It Take to Hatch a Dinosaur Egg? FSU Research Says 3-6 Months

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How long did it take for dinosaur eggs to incubate? Groundbreaking research led by Florida State University establishes a timeline of three to six months.

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Evolution, Histology, Paleontology, Biology, aerobic capacity, Dinosaurs, archosaurs, Mammals, mammals and birds, Birds, Fossils

Biologists Follow ‘Fossilizable’ Clues to Pinpoint When Mammal, Bird and Dinosaur Ancestors Became Athletes

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The study is the first to draw a link between RBC size and microscopic traces of blood vessels and bone cells inside bones. They found that extinct mammal and bird relatives had smaller RBCs and were likely better athletes than earlier terrestrial vertebrates. The timing of RBC-size reduction coincided with Earth's greatest mass extinction 252 mya.

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New Prehistoric Bird Species Discovered

A team of geologists at the University of Rochester has discovered a new species of bird in the Canadian Arctic. At approximately 90 million years old, the bird fossils are among the oldest avian records found in the northernmost latitude, and offer further evidence of an intense warming event during the late Cretaceous period.

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Amber Specimen Offers Rare Glimpse of Feathered Dinosaur Tail

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Researchers from China, Canada, and the University of Bristol have discovered a dinosaur tail complete with its feathers trapped in a piece of amber.

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Paleontology, Mammals, Evolution, Marsupials

New Study Traces the Origins of Marsupials in N. America, Find Mammals During Age of Dinosaurs Packed a Powerful Bite

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A new study by Burke Museum and University of Washington paleontologists describes an early marsupial relative called Didelphodon vorax that lived alongside ferocious dinosaurs and had, pound-for-pound, the strongest bite force of any mammal ever recorded.

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Dinosaur, dinosaur growth, dinosaur discovery, Geoscience, Science, Research, Virginia Tech, Fralin Life Science Institute, global change center

Virginia Tech Geoscientists Size-Up Early Dinosaurs, Find Surprising Variation

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The study focused on the skeletal changes that occurred during growth in the small carnivorous dinosaur Coelophysis (SEE-lo-FY-sis), one of the earliest dinosaurs.

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Archaeology, New World, Earth Science, Geology & soil

UF Archaeologist Uses Chicxulub ‘Dinosaur Crater’ Rocks, Prehistoric Teeth to Track Ancient Humans

Where’s the best place to start when retracing the life of a person who lived 4,000 years ago? Turns out, it’s simple -- you start at the beginning.

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Greenland Fossils Help Show Recovery After Mass Extinction Event 252 Million Years Ago

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A new study published in Scientific Reports shows how higher latitude ecosystems recovered after the World's most cataclysmic extinction event 252 million years ago.

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Herbivorous Mammals Have Bigger Bellies

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What do enormous dinosaurs have in common with tiny shrews? They are both four-legged vertebrates, otherwise known as tetrapods. In the course of evolution, tetrapods developed various body shapes and sizes - from the mouse to the dinosaur - to adapt to different environments. Their feeding habits range from pure herbivory to fierce carnivory, and their body structure reflects this feeding diversity. As plants are usually more difficult to digest than meat, herbivores are thought to need larger guts and more voluminous bellies. Nevertheless, this hypothesis had never been tested scientifically.

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photon sciences, X-ray science, Advanced Photon Source, Biology

Why Did T. Rex Have Such Small Arms? SUE Arrives at Advanced Photon Source for Its Most Detailed Scan Ever

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SUE the Dinosaur’s forearm came to the Advanced Photon Source for its most detailed scan ever, which could shed light on why the large dinosaur had such small arms.

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New Species of Ancient Texas Reptile Offers Clues to Evolution of Dinosaurs

newly described species of extinct reptile that roamed Texas more than 200 million years ago had a strikingly dome-shaped head with a very thick skull and a large natural pit on top that lends the appearance of an extra eye, according to a study released Sept. 22 in Current Biology.

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Evolution, Reptiles, Paleontology, drepanosaurus, Fossils

New Research Reveals an Ancient Reptile Had Bizarre Forelimb Evolution

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Fossil remains from an ancient reptile known as Drepanosaurus reveals unusual skeletal adaptations in the forelimb that scientists have never before recorded in land animals.

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Paleontology, Theropod, ornamentation, body size

Outrageous Heads Led to Outrageously Large Dinosaurs

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New research from North Carolina State University shows that theropod dinosaur species with bony crests, horns and knobs evolved to giant body sizes 20 times faster than those species lacking such embellishments.

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Pterosaur, Dinosaurs

A Rare Small Specimen Discovered From the Age of Flying Giants

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A rare small-bodied pterosaur, a flying reptile from the Late Cretaceous period approximately 77 million years ago, is the first of its kind to have been discovered on the west coast of North America.

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new species, Paleontology, Patagonia

New Species of Pterosaur Discovered in Patagonia

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Scientists today announced the discovery of a new species of pterosaur from the Patagonia region of South America. The researchers have named this new species ‘ Allkauren koi’ from the native Tehuelche word ‘all’ for ‘brain’, and ‘karuen’ for ‘ancient’.

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University of Washington Paleontologists Discover Major T. Rex Fossil

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Paleontologists with the University of Washington's Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture have discovered a Tyrannosaurus rex, including a very complete skull. The find, which paleontologists estimate to be about 20 percent of the animal, includes vertebrae, ribs, hips and lower jaw bones.

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Anthropology research, Astrophyics, Dinosaur

Fossil Reveals Ostrich Relatives Once Lived in North America

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New research reveals that 50-million-year-old bird fossil specimens, some of which are on display in the Museum’s special exhibition Dinosaurs Among Us, are from a previously unknown relative of the modern-day ostrich.







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