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Science

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Dinosaurs, Cretaceous Period, Carboniferous Period, Elephants, Mammoths, Northern Arizona University, NAU, Chris Doughty, global fertility, vegitation

New Research Shows Dinosaur Dung Fertilizes Planet

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According to NAU researcher Chris Doughty, these large animals are important not for the quantity of dung they produce, but for their ability to move long distances across landscapes, effectively mixing the nutrients.

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Birds, Evolution, Mass Extinction, Lab of Ornithology

Dino-Killing Asteroid's Impact on Bird Evolution

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Human activities could change the pace of evolution, similar to what occurred 66 million years ago when a giant asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs, leaving modern birds as their only descendants. That's one conclusion drawn by the authors of a new study published in Systematic Biology.

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Big Herbivorous Dinosaurs Ate Crustaceans as Side Dish

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Some big plant-eating dinosaurs roaming present-day Utah some 75 million years ago were slurping up crustaceans on the side, a behavior that may have been tied to reproductive activities, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study.  

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FROG, Dinosaur, Pac-man, Bite Force, Ecology

Bite Force Research Reveals Dinosaur-Eating Frog

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Scientists say that a large, now extinct, frog called Beelzebufo that lived about 68 million years ago in Madagascar would have been capable of eating small dinosaurs.

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Texas Tech University, Plesiosaurs, Evolution, Fossil, Sankar Chatterjee, Convergent Evolution

Texas Tech Paleontologist Aids in New Discovery 33 Years after Finding Fossil

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The fossilized plesiosaur Sankar Chatterjee found in 1984 is giving scientists a new understanding of convergent evolution between reptiles and mammals.

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Dinosaurs, Plesiosaurs, flippers, Robots, hydrodynamic efficiency, Hydrodynamics, Thrust, Engineering, Propulsion, Swimming, Fossils

Study Uses Robot to Probe Mystery of Prehistoric Sea Creature’s Swimming Style

A new study led by the University of Southampton has shed light on the swimming style of plesiosaurs by creating a robot to mimic its movements.

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Paleontology, Imaging, X-Ray, neutron imaging, CT imaging

Unique Imaging of a Dinosaur’s Skull Tells Evolutionary Tale

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Researchers using Los Alamos’ unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast in the highest-resolution scan of tyrannosaur skull ever done.

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Evolution, Paleontology, Mammals, Fossils

First Winged Mammals From the Jurassic Period Discovered

Two 160 million-year-old mammal fossils discovered in China show that the forerunners of mammals in the Jurassic Period evolved to glide and live in trees. With long limbs, long hand and foot fingers, and wing-like membranes for tree-to-tree gliding, Maiopatagium furculiferum and Vilevolodon diplomylos are the oldest known gliders in the long history of early mammals.

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Paleontology, Evolution Biology, Crocodilians, T. rex, Madagascar, Jurassic

Gigantic Crocodile with T. Rex Teeth Was a Top Land Predator of the Jurassic in Madagascar

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Little is known about the origin and early evolution of the Notosuchia, hitherto unknown in the Jurassic period. New research on fossils from Madagascar, published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ by Italian and French paleontologists, begin to fill the gap in a million-year-long ghost lineage.

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dinosaur discovery, Dinosaur, dinosaur physiology, Dinosaurs, neurovascular networks, Palaeontology, 3D imaging, Fossils, Trigeminal, Feeding, Courtship, Nests

Sensitive Faces Helped Dinosaurs Eat, Woo and Take Temperature, Suggests Study

Dinosaurs' faces might have been much more sensitive than previously thought, and crucial to tasks from precision eating and testing nest temperature to combat and mating rituals, according to a University of Southampton study.







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