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Did Ocean Acidification From the Asteroid Impact That Killed the Dinosaurs Cause the Extinction of Marine Molluscs?

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New research, led by the University of Southampton, has questioned the role played by ocean acidification, produced by the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs, in the extinction of ammonites and other planktonic calcifiers 66 million years ago.

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Trending Stories Report for 24 April 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: exercise and obesity, Focused Ultrasound to treat uterine fibroids, neurology, diet supplements and cancer (day 4 in top 10), genetics, geology, skin cancer, sleep and Alzheimer's, and water conservation.

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Oxygen-Depleted Toxic Oceans Had Key Role in Mass Extinction Over 200 Million Years Ago

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Changes in the biochemical balance of the ocean were a crucial factor in the end-Triassic mass extinction, during which half of all plant, animal and marine life on Earth perished, according to new research involving the University of Southampton.

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Crocodile Ancestor Was Top Predator Before Dinosaurs Roamed North America

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Carnufex carolinensis, or the “Carolina Butcher,” was a 9-foot long, land-dwelling crocodylomorph that walked on its hind legs and likely preyed upon smaller inhabitants of North Carolina ecosystems such as armored reptiles and early mammal relatives.

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Virginia Tech Paleontologist Names a Carnivorous Reptile That Preceded Dinosaurs

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Paleontologist Sterling Nesbitt's latest addition to the paleontological vernacular is Nundasuchus, a 9-foot-long carnivorous reptile with steak knifelike teeth and bony plates on the back.

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Why Lizards Have Bird Breath

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Biologists long assumed that one-way air flow was a special adaptation in birds driven by the intense energy demands of flight. But now University of Utah scientists have shown that bird-like breathing also developed in green iguanas – reptiles not known for high-capacity aerobic fitness. The finding bolsters the case that unidirectional bird-like flow evolved long before the first birds.

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Tooth Serves as Evidence of 220 Million-Year-Old Attack

At the beginning of the age of dinosaurs, gigantic reptiles—distant relatives of modern crocodiles—ruled the earth. Some lived on land and others in water and it was thought they didn't much interact. But a tooth found by a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, researcher in the thigh of one of these ancient animals is challenging this belief.

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Tooth Buried in Bone Shows Prehistoric Predators Tangled Across Land, Sea Boundaries

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Before dinosaurs, it was thought the top aquatic and terrestrial predators didn't often interact. But researchers at Virginia Tech and the University of Tennessee discovered that the smaller of the two apex predators was potentially targeting the larger animal.

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Dinosaur Family Tree Gives Fresh Insight Into Rapid Rise of Birds

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The study shows that the familiar anatomical features of birds – such as feathers, wings and wishbones – all first evolved piecemeal in their dinosaur ancestors over tens of millions of years. However, once a fully functioning bird body shape was complete, an evolutionary explosion began, causing a rapid increase in the rate at which birds evolved. This led eventually to the thousands of avian species that we know today.

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Scientists Report First Semiaquatic Dinosaur, Spinosaurus

Scientists today unveiled what appears to be the first truly semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus.