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Mercury in Fish, Seafood May Be Linked to Higher Risk of ALS

Eating fish and seafood with higher levels of mercury may be linked to a higher risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. However, fish and seafood consumption as a regular part of the diet was not associated with ALS.

Medicine

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Stroke, Physical Therapy, physical therapist

Study on Walking Ability Shows Path to Treatment for Stroke Survivors

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Stroke is the leading cause of disability in older adults in the United States, but research by Clarkson University Physical Therapy Professor George Fulk and his colleagues is pointing the way to recovery for people who are relearning how to walk.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Neurons, Motivation, Addiction, Decision Making, Cell Biology, Neuroscience

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Feb-2017 1:00 PM EST

Medicine

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short-term memory, Rutishauser, Mamelak, Memory Disorders

Cedars-Sinai Investigators Identify Human Brain Processes Critical to Short-Term Memory

Cedars-Sinai neuroscientists have uncovered processes involved in how the human brain creates and maintains short-term memories. This study is the first clear demonstration of precisely how human brain cells work to create and recall short-term memories. Confirmation of this process and the specific brain regions involved is a critical step in developing meaningful treatments for memory disorders that affect millions of Americans.

Medicine

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Meningiomas, Brain Cancer, Yale Cancer Center

What Turns Benign Central Nervous System Tumors Deadly

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In a new study, Yale researchers identified genetic abnormalities that mark atypical meningiomas, which have a 40% chance of recurring after surgical removal and are marked by a shorter survival rate than benign tumors.

Medicine

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Xinzhong Dong, itch , GRP neuron, Gastrin releasing peptide neuron, pain, Signal

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Feb-2017 12:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Repetitive Head Injuries May Not Cause Movement Problems for Former NFL Players

Former NFL players who had repeated head injuries may not have significant problems with motor functions later in life, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017.

Medicine

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Stem Cells

Blast Off: Stem Cells From Mayo Clinic Physician’s Lab Launch Into Space

Today, the latest rocket launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, included a payload of several samples of donated adult stem cells from a research laboratory at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus.

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Feb-2017 4:00 PM EST

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Feb-2017 4:00 PM EST

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Feb-2017 4:00 PM EST

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Feb-2017 4:00 PM EST

Medicine

Science

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Neurons, Brain, Gene Expression

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Feb-2017 12:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Radiosurgery, Brain Tumor, Neurology, Stereotactic

Targeted Radiosurgery Better Than Whole-Brain Radiation for Treating Brain Tumors

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Tumors that originate in other organs of the body and spread to the brain are known as metastatic brain tumors. According to the American Brain Tumor Association, this type of tumor is the most common in adults, affecting as many as 300,000 people each year. University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers compared two common postsurgical therapies for metastatic brain tumors and found that stereotactic radiosurgery can provide better outcomes for patients compared to whole-brain radiation.

Medicine

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Autism, Neurodevelopment Disabilities, Autism diagnosis

Max Wiznitzer, MD, Autism Expert, University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, Available for Comment on Nature Autism Study

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Max Wiznitzer, MD, has a longstanding interest in neurodevelopmental disabilities, including autism.

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New Test May Quickly Identify Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Underlying Brain Damage

A new test using peripheral vision reaction time could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as a concussion.

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B Vitamins Reduce Schizophrenia Symptoms

A review of worldwide studies has found that add-on treatment with high-dose b-vitamins - including B6, B8 and B12 - can significantly reduce symptoms of schizophrenia more than standard treatments alone.

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A Method Based on Artificial Intelligence Allows to Diagnose Alzheimer's or Parkinson's

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Researchers from the UGR and UMA have designed a technique that aims to model high-level data abstractions to make computers learn to differentiate the brain of a healthy person from that of an ill person by extracting the affected regions.

Science

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Aneurysm, Brain Surgery, Brain, High Performace Computing, Supercomptuer, Stroke, Blood, NIH

When Treating Brain Aneurysms, Two Isn’t Always Better Than One

Is it better to treat aneurysms with two overlapping flow diverters, or one compressed diverter? A computational study published in the American Journal of Neuroradiology points to the single, compressed diverter provided that it produces a mesh denser than the two overlapped diverters, and that it covers at least half of the aneurysm opening. The ongoing research could eventually help doctors determine the best way to treat patients suffering from aneurysms.







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