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Embargo will expire:
22-Aug-2018 4:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
17-Aug-2018 4:40 PM EDT

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Article ID: 699182

Automated Detection of Focal Epileptic Seizures in a Sentinel Area of the Human Brain

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have identified a sentinel area of the brain that gives an early warning before clinical seizure manifestations of focal epilepsy, and they can automatically detect that early warning. This offers the possibility of squelching the seizure — before the patient feels any symptoms.

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17-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699168

Stroke Patients Treated at a Teaching Hospital Are Less Likely to Be Readmitted

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Stroke patients appear to receive better care at teaching hospitals with less of a chance of landing back in a hospital during the early stages of recovery, according to new research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

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17-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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20-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
17-Aug-2018 11:15 AM EDT

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    17-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698999

Alcohol Use Disorders Have Long-Term Effects on Brain Structure and Cognitive Function

Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are known to adversely impact brain structure and function. Although recovery of brain morphology and function has been reported following abstinence from long-term alcohol use, some structural (e.g., brain area volumes and connections) and functional (e.g., cognitive) abnormalities due to long-term effects of AUDs may persist even after abstinence from alcohol. To further our understanding, scientists assessed the consequences of long-term alcohol use on brain circuitry, structural impairment patterns, and the impact of these impairments on cognitive function among individuals with AUDs who were abstinent.

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14-Aug-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Embargo will expire:
21-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
16-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT

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Article ID: 699102

Duck Power: Measuring How Much Waterfowl Feel the Burn

University of Delaware

Researchers at the University of Delaware are studying how much energy ducks burn during a given day to study a habitat's carrying capacity. The data can be used to help with conservation efforts, determining if landscapes provide enough habitat to support waterfowl populations at ideal levels.

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16-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699087

Study: The Eyes May Have It, an Early Sign of Parkinson’s Disease

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

The eyes may be a window to the brain for people with early Parkinson’s disease. People with the disease gradually lose brain cells that produce dopamine, a substance that helps control movement. Now a new study has found that the thinning of the retina, the lining of nerve cells in the back of the eye, is linked to the loss of such brain cells. The study is published in the August 15, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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16-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699083

Brain Response Study Upends Thinking About Why Practice Speeds Up Motor Reaction Times

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that a computerized study of 36 healthy adult volunteers asked to repeat the same movement over and over became significantly faster when asked to repeat that movement on demand—a result that occurred not because they anticipated the movement, but because of an as yet unknown mechanism that prepared their brains to replicate the same action.

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16-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
20-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
15-Aug-2018 3:30 PM EDT

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