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Medicine

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Obesity, Weight Loss, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Family Based Therapy, Parent Based Therapy, Childhood Obesity

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-May-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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bariatric center accreditation, Bariatric Surgery, Obesity, Metabolic Surgery, Surgical Outcomes, Reoperation, Surgical Complications, Healthcare Costs

Probing Problems with Bariatric Surgery: Reoperations, Variation Are Common

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Every year, nearly 200,000 Americans turn to surgeons for help with their obesity, seeking bariatric surgery to lose weight and prevent life-threatening health problems. But after more than two decades of steadily increasing numbers of operations, American bariatric surgery centers still vary greatly in the quality of care they provide.

Medicine

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HIV, HIV adolescents, adolescent AIDS

Study Shows Navigation Program Improves Longevity of Care for Youth with HIV in America

Adherence to care improves when youth with HIV receive education and help navigating the system, according to study out of UAB.

Medicine

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Geriatric, Statin, Preventive Care, JAMA, Cardiovascular, Older Adults, cardiovascular prevention

Starting Statins in Older Patients Not Effective as Preventive Care

A study from NYU Langone Medical Center researchers published in JAMA Internal Medicine finds that initiating statins in heart-healthy older adults may not extend lifespan.

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Medical Ethics, American Thoracic Society, Intensive Care, Healthcare Decisions, Decision Making, JAMA, patient outcomes

Penn Study Pinpoints Accuracy of ICU Doctors’ and Nurses’ Predictions of Patient Outcomes

Physicians in intensive care units routinely consider their patients’ chances of survival and recovery when guiding patients and family members in making important decisions about care plans. A new study is shedding light on the accuracy of those judgments — and for the first time also reveals the accuracy of ICU nurses’ predictions of patient outcomes. For example, the study shows that ICU physicians are better at predicting whether patients will be alive in six months than they are at predicting patients’ cognitive function in six months, and the more confident doctors are when making predictions, the more accurate those predictions tend to be.

Medicine

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Nursing Home, UTI, Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Catheter, Urinary Catheter, Patient Safety, Infection Control

Nursing Homes Cut Urinary Tract Infections in Half Through Focused Effort on Catheter Care

A new study shows a way to keep urinary catheters from posing as much of a risk to the 1.4 million Americans currently in long-term and post-acute care. The research shows that urinary tract infections related to catheters fell by 54 percent in 404 nursing homes in 38 states that took part in a national patient safety effort.

Medicine

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Colorectal Cancer Screening

Strategy Significantly Boosts Colorectal Screening for Groups with Low Rates

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Researchers report in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine that providing one-on-one support and customized tools for decision-making increased screening rates for patients at two community health centers in North Carolina and New Mexico.

Medicine

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National Eye Institute (NEI), Systemic Therapy, intraocular implant, Uveitis, Visual Acuity, Corticosteroids, Immunosuppressants, Vision, must

NIH-Funded Clinical Trial Shows Systemic Therapy Outperforms Intraocular Implant for Uveitis

Systemic therapy consisting of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants preserved vision of uveitis patients better – and had fewer adverse outcomes – than a long-lasting corticosteroid intraocular implant, according to a clinical trial funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI). After seven years, visual acuity on average remained stable among participants on systemic therapy but declined by an average of six letters (about one line on an eye chart) among participants who had the implant. NEI is part of the National Institutes of Health.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, Cancer Screening, Prevention, Mammograms, Coding, dream challenge, moonshot, Oncology, Women’s health

Coding, Machines May Decrease False Positives in Breast Cancer Screenings

Machine learning (or coding) could help reduce false positives from mammography screening, according to an article study published online in the May 4, 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Oncology. The national coding competition known as the DREAM Challenge, launched during the inauguration of Vice President Biden’s Cancer Moonshot Challenge, may help mitigate this harm associated with routine screening.

Science

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National Eye Institute (NEI), National Institutes Of Health (NIH), eye, Tissue, Competition, human retina, Visually Impaired, Blind, Vision disorders, human eye tissue, retinal cells, 3-D Retina Organoid Challenge, retinal organoids

NIH Launches Competition to Develop Human Eye Tissue in a Dish

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The National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, has opened the first stage of a federal prize competition designed to generate miniature, lab-grown human retinas. The retina is the light- sensitive tissue in the back of the eye. Over the next three years pending availability of funds, NEI plans to offer more than $1 million in prize money to spur development of human retina organoids.







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