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Jeffrey Trost, Blood Test, Heart

Research Review Recommends Eliminating Widely Ordered Blood Test for Diagnosing Heart Attacks

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Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Mayo Clinic have compiled peer-reviewed evidence and crafted a guideline designed to help physicians and medical centers stop the use of a widely ordered blood test that adds no value in evaluating patients with suspected heart attack.

Medicine

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Duke University School of Medicine, Duke Cancer Institute, Yousuf Zafar, Financial toxicity, Cancer Care, Cancer Cost, cancer costs, Insurance Coverage, health insurance benefits

Out-of-Pocket Costs Exceed What Many Insured Cancer Patients Expect to Pay

A third of insured people with cancer end up paying more out-of-pocket than they expected, despite having health coverage, researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have found.

Medicine

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Melanoma, Skin Cancer

Researchers Look to Improve Detection of Skin Cancer Lacking Pigment Melanin

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UNC Lineberger scientists led a multi-institution research team to identify key features linked to amelanotic melanoma, a form of skin cancer that lacks the brown or black color that stems from the pigment melanin.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Suicide, Netflix, Google

Netflix Drama “13 Reasons Why” Linked to Suicidal Thoughts

A recent study out of San Diego State University has found an increase of internet searches for suicide immediately following the release of the popular Netflix show “13 Reasons Why.” Researchers used data from Google Trends and found that suicide-related queries were 19 percent higher than expected following the show’s release in March.

Medicine

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Mark Bicket, Peter Pronovost, Opioid, Drugs, Perscription

Study Adds to Evidence That Most Prescribed Opioid Pills Go Unused

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In a review of half a dozen published studies in which patients self-reported use of opioids prescribed to them after surgery, researchers at Johns Hopkins report that a substantial majority of patients used only some or none of the pills, and more than 90 percent failed to dispose of the leftovers in recommended ways.

Medicine

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Epilepsy, Children, Precision Medicine, Genetic Testing, Seizures, Diagnosis

Genetic Testing Helps Detect Cause of Early Life Epilepsy

A study published in JAMA Pediatrics supports the use of genetic testing, especially with sequencing, as first-line diagnostic method for young children with seizures. Specific genetic factors were found to be the cause of epilepsy in 40 percent of patients evaluated for first presentation with seizures. Genetic testing also yielded a diagnosis in 25 percent of children who had epilepsy with an otherwise unknown cause.

Medicine

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children's hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center, Dr. Seetha Shankaran, neonatologist, Pediatrics, JAMA Pediatrics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Body Cooling for Newborns , Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic, NICHD Neonatal Research Network, HIE, Hypothermia, Neonatal Depression, Perinatal asphyxia, Feta

Study Examines the Safest Hypothermia Treatment for Newborns

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After more than 20 years of research on the best treatment for full-term infants affected by oxygen deprivation during the birthing process, Seetha Shankaran, M.D., neonatologist at DMC Children's Hospital of Michigan and DMC Hutzel Women's Hospital, served as the lead investigator in a definitive Journal of the American Medical Association study that documented the safest depth and duration of body-cooling to minimize injury from hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborns.

Medicine

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Obesity, Bariatric Surgery, Weight Loss, Metabolic Surgery, BMI, Weight

Opting for Weight-Loss Surgery at Lower BMIs May Be Best for Patients’ Health, Study Suggests

The struggle to escape obesity is pointing more Americans toward bariatric surgery. But a new study shows that only one in three patients who have an operation succeed in getting their body-mass index below 30, the cutoff for obesity, in the first year. The odds were better for those who had surgery while they were still below a “morbid obesity” BMI of 40.

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Suicide, Army STARRS, predicting suicide, Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine, attempted suicide, Suicide Risk

Unit History of Suicide Attempt Increases Suicide Risk for Troops

Does a previous suicide attempt in a soldier’s unit increase the risk of additional suicide attempts? According to a study, “Risk of Suicide Attempt Associated with Previous Attempts in One’s Army Unit,” published July 26, 2017 in JAMA Psychiatry, the answer is yes.

Medicine

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Saint Louis University School of Medicine, paul hauptman, Heart Failure, Stem Cells, SLU School of medicine

Despite Lack of FDA Approval, Stem Cell Centers Claim to Offer Effective Treatment for Patients with Heart Failure

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Stem cell centers claim to offer effective treatment to patients with heart failure, despite the fact that the treatment is not approved for such use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), says the author of research letter in the current issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.







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