Feature Channels:

In the Workplace

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Bullying, bullying solutions, workplace bullying, organizational communication, work culture, Harrassment

Does Advice for Managing Workplace Bullying Really Work?

In a new study featured in the National Communication Association’s Journal of Applied Communication Research, authors Stacy Tye-Williams and Kathleen J. Krone identify and re-imagine the paradox of workplace bullying advice. They interviewed 48 individuals from a variety of occupations and found that targets of workplace bullying frequently offered advice they had received to other targets, despite believing that the advice either made no difference or had made their own situations worse.

Science

Channels:

Scientists, Scientific workforce

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Mar-2017 3:00 PM EDT

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Robots, Job Insecurity, Anxiety, Health Issues, Automation, Artificial Intelligence, Bill Gates, Unemployment, job displacement, fear, technobia, romantic rejection, fear of public speaking

People Afraid of Robots Are Much More Likely to Fear Losing Their Jobs and Suffer Anxiety-Related Mental Health Issues, Baylor Study Finds

Technophobeimage.jpg

“Technophobes” — people who fear robots, artificial intelligence and new technology that they don’t understand — are much more likely to be afraid of losing their jobs due to technology and to suffer anxiety-related mental health issues, a Baylor University researcher says.

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

worker behavior, Memory & Cognitive Processes

Skilled Workers More Prone to Mistakes When Interrupted

Expertise is clearly beneficial in the workplace, yet highly trained workers in some occupations could actually be at risk for making errors when interrupted, indicates a new study by two Michigan State University psychology researchers.

Medicine

Channels:

Wellness program, Journal Of Occupational And Environmental Medicine, worker health

Surveys Provide Employers' and Employees' Views on Wellness Programs

Most US employers offer workplace health promotion (WHP) programs, but many employees aren't aware of these programs, reports a study in the March Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Gender and Business, gender inequity, gender and politics, women issues, Gender and Relationships, Gender Inequality

Forgiving Males, Firing Females: Women in the Workplace Face Harsher Discipline

In their recently published paper, “When Harry Fired Sally: The Double Standard in Punishing Misconduct,” University of Chicago Booth School of Business’ Gregor Matvos, Stanford’s Amit Seru and University of Minnesota’s Mark Egan explore how women working in the financial advisory industry are punished more severely than their male coworkers for similar misconduct.

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

NCAA Basketball Tournament, March Madness, Office, Workplace, Workplace Advice

Setting Boundaries for March Madness in the Workplace

BasketballVTvsUNC.jpg

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Extreme Views, Game Theory, Soda Tax, ACA Repeal, and More in the U.S. Politics News Source

Go here for the latest political experts, features and research in U.S. Politics

Medicine

Business

Channels:

best companies to work for, Fortune

Mayo Clinic Named to Fortune’s ‘100 Best Companies to Work for’ List

Fortune named Mayo Clinic to its 2017 list of the “100 Best Companies to Work For,” ranking it No. 84. Mayo was No. 86 in 2016. This is Mayo’s 14th consecutive year on the list, which recognizes companies that rate highly with staff.

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Minimum Wage, Teen Pregnancy

Increasing Minimum Wage Would Reduce Teen Pregnancies

bullinger.jpg

A $1 increase in the minimum wage would likely reduce the U.S. adolescent birth rate by about 2 percent, according to new Indiana University research. That would mean about 5,000 fewer births annually.







Chat now!