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Study Finds That Employees Who Are Open About Religion Are Happier

Employees who openly discuss their religious beliefs at work are often happier and have higher job satisfaction than those employees who do not, according to a collaborative study that involves a Kansas State University researcher.

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Is It Okay to Vet Candidates on Social Media During Recruitment?

A recent article in the Journal of Applied Communication Research discusses the practice of cybervetting potential employees online as part of the recruitment process. Is such surveillance an unethical invasion of privacy? Or, is it simply a way for employers to enhance their review of formal credentials to ensure a good person-environment fit? The authors explore the legitimacy and outcomes of this practice following interviews with 45 recruiting managers.

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Medicine

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Occupational Sitting Among Women Linked to Obesity

You might want to stand up for this. Occupational sitting is associated with an increased likelihood of obesity, especially among black women, independent of occupational and leisure time physical activity, finds a new study from the School of Medicine and the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Women Outperform Men in Some Financial Negotiations, Research Finds

In certain circumstances, women may be more effective than men when negotiating money matters, contrary to conventional wisdom that men drive a harder bargain in financial affairs, according to a new meta-analysis published by the American Psychological Association.

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Unhappy Hour: Non-Drinkers Devise Strategies to Navigate Booze-Centered Work Events

From holiday parties to happy hours, social events with co-workers often revolve around alcohol, which can put non-drinkers in an awkward position. A new study shows that tensions in these environments lead non-drinkers to develop techniques to fit in socially without taking a drink.

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Political Correctness in Diverse Workplace Fosters Creativity

People may associate political correctness with conformity but new research finds it also correlates with creativity in work settings. Imposing a norm that sets clear expectations of how women and men should interact with each other into a work environment unexpectedly encourages creativity among mixed-sex work groups by reducing uncertainty in relationships. The study highlights a paradoxical consequence of the political correctness (PC) norm.

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LinkedIn Study Shows US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

A study tracking the worldwide migration of professional workers to the United States found that the nation is attracting a smaller proportional share of those workers relative to other countries - raising questions about the U.S.'s ability to remain competitive in attracting top talent.

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Job Authority Increases Depression Symptoms in Women, Decreases Them in Men

A new study finds that having job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men.

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Medicine

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From Architect to Social Worker: Complex Jobs May Protect Memory and Thinking Later in Life

People whose jobs require more complex work with other people, such as social workers and lawyers, or with data, like architects or graphic designers, may end up having longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities compared to people who do less complex work, according to research published in the November 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal and the University of Montreal.

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