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Cellphone Addiction Harming Academic Performance Is ‘an Increasingly Realistic Possibility’

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Women college students spend an average of 10 hours a day on their cellphones, with men college students spending nearly eight hours, according to a Baylor University study on cellphone activity published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions.

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Student Debt Growing, Number of University Financial Education Programs Still Deficient

Kansas State University financial planner finds most universities are lacking a financial education program. She outlines the different types of successful programs and how to get started.

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How Parents Can Help Their Children Succeed and Stay in School

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Students are back in school and now is the time for parents to develop routines to help their children succeed academically. An Iowa State University professor says parental involvement, more than income or social status, is a predictor of student achievement.

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Learning by Watching, Toddlers Show Intuitive Understanding of Probability

Most people know children learn many skills simply by watching people around them. Without explicit instructions youngsters know to do things like press a button to operate the television and twist a knob to open a door. Now researchers have taken this further, finding that children as young as age 2 intuitively use mathematical concepts such as probability to help make sense of the world around them.

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Home Sweet Home: Does Where You Live Impact Student Success?

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Where you live doesn’t have to determine your school success, according to a recent study by Dr. Tracy Alloway, UNF assistant professor of psychology. Instead, your working memory—your ability to remember and process information—is a much better predictor of learning outcomes.

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Faculty Members Develop Free Alternative Textbooks to Save Students Money

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Through an alternative textbook initiative, Kansas State University faculty members are helping students save an estimated $423,000 a year in textbook costs.

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High School Rock Orchestra Experience Fostered Long-Term Musical Involvement

Former members of a suburban Cleveland high school rock orchestra report staying highly involved in music and that the experience prepared them to achieve in ways that came as a surprise.

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Unlike Less Educated People, College Grads More Active on Weekends Than Weekdays

People’s educational attainment influences their level of physical activity both during the week and on weekends, according to a study whose authors include two University of Kansas researchers.

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Study Finds Range of Skills Students Taught in School Linked to Race and Class Size

Pressure to meet national education standards may be the reason states with significant populations of African-American students and those with larger class sizes often require children to learn fewer skills, finds a University of Kansas researcher.

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Study Details Shortage of Replication in Education Research

Although replicating important findings is essential for helping education research improve its usefulness to policymakers and practitioners, less than one percent of the articles published in the top education research journals are replication studies, according to new research published today in Educational Researcher (ER), a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

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