Previous Article Next Article
  • This cosmic tapestry unveils galaxies in all shapes, sizes, and colors. Some of the galaxies are nearby; the smaller ones are far away and existed when the universe was only a small fraction of its current age of roughly 14 billion years. The Hubble observation, made with the Advanced Camera for Surveys, is part of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey, a collaborative effort using major ground-based and space-based telescopes to focus on a narrow swath of sky near the Big Dipper. The region offers a clear view of the distant universe. The image was taken from June 2004 to March 2005
    NASA, ESA, M. Davis (University of California, Berkeley), S. Faber (University of California, Santa Cruz), and A. Koekemoer (STScI)
    This cosmic tapestry unveils galaxies in all shapes, sizes, and colors. Some of the galaxies are nearby; the smaller ones are far away and existed when the universe was only a small fraction of its current age of roughly 14 billion years. The Hubble observation, made with the Advanced Camera for Surveys, is part of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey, a collaborative effort using major ground-based and space-based telescopes to focus on a narrow swath of sky near the Big Dipper. The region offers a clear view of the distant universe. The image was taken from June 2004 to March 2005
  • The image at left, taken by A. Fujii with a backyard telescope, shows the location of the Hubble observations near the Big Dipper. The long, narrow image in the center is Hubble's panoramic view of the area, made by assembling 500 photographs taken over a one-year period (June 2004 to March 2005) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. The 50,000 galaxies spied in the image are scattered across a region that is equivalent to the apparent diameter of two full Moons. The dimensions of the final mosaic are 21 images long by 3 images tall. The image at right is a section of the panoramic photo. A wide diversity of galaxies can be seen throughout both Hubble images.
    Ground-basedIimage Credit: A. Fujii Hubble Image Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Davis (University of California, Berkeley), S. Faber (University of California, Santa Cruz), and A. Koekemoer (STScI)
    The image at left, taken by A. Fujii with a backyard telescope, shows the location of the Hubble observations near the Big Dipper. The long, narrow image in the center is Hubble's panoramic view of the area, made by assembling 500 photographs taken over a one-year period (June 2004 to March 2005) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. The 50,000 galaxies spied in the image are scattered across a region that is equivalent to the apparent diameter of two full Moons. The dimensions of the final mosaic are 21 images long by 3 images tall. The image at right is a section of the panoramic photo. A wide diversity of galaxies can be seen throughout both Hubble images.




Chat now!