Newswise Blogs: Medical News

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Thursday, September 29, 2011

“Magic Mushrooms” May Create Lasting Personality Change

A single high dose of the hallucinogen psilocybin, the active ingredient in so-called “magic mushrooms,” was enough to bring about a measureable personality change lasting at least a year in nearly 60 percent of the 51 participants in a new study, according to the Johns Hopkins researchers who conducted it.

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Posted by Craig Jones on 09/29 at 01:41 PM
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Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Low Vitamin B12 Levels May Lead to Brain Shrinkage, Cognitive Problems

Older people with low blood levels of vitamin B12 markers may be more likely to have lower brain volumes and have problems with their thinking skills, according to researchers at Rush University Medical Center. The results of the study are published in the Sept. 27 issue of Neurology.

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Posted by Craig Jones on 09/27 at 08:46 AM
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Monday, September 19, 2011

Probiotics Have Slight Preventive Effect on Colds

Taking probiotics seems to provide both children and adults with a mild degree of protection against many upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) including the common cold, according to a new systematic review.

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Posted by Craig Jones on 09/19 at 09:58 AM
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Friday, September 16, 2011

Video Games May Not Boost Cognition

Over the past decade, many studies and news media reports have suggested that action video games such as Medal of Honor or Unreal Tournament improve a variety of perceptual and cognitive abilities. But in a paper published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, Walter Boot, an assistant professor in Florida State University’s Department of Psychology, critically reevaluates those claims.

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Posted by Craig Jones on 09/16 at 09:40 AM
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Thursday, August 18, 2011

Milk Better than Water to Rehydrate Kids

McMaster researchers have found that milk is a more effective way of countering dehydration in active children than a sports drink or water itself.

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Posted by Craig Jones on 08/18 at 10:39 AM
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Monday, August 15, 2011

Menthol Cigarettes May Make it Tougher to Quit Smoking for Certain Populations

Could a mint-flavored additive to cigarettes have a negative impact on smoking cessation efforts? New research from investigators at The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and UMDNJ-School of Public Health shines a light on this topic. It finds that menthol cigarettes are associated with decreased quitting in the United States, and that this effect is more pronounced for blacks and Puerto Ricans.

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Posted by Craig Jones on 08/15 at 12:12 PM
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Thursday, August 11, 2011

Tanning Bed Users Exhibit Brain Changes and Behavior Similar to Addicts

People who frequently use tanning beds may be spurred by an addictive neurological reward-and-reinforcement trigger, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in a pilot study.

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Posted by Craig Jones on 08/11 at 12:00 PM
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Friday, July 15, 2011

Natural Chemical Found In Grapes May Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease by Decreasing Neuroto

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found that grape seed polyphenols—a natural antioxidant—may help prevent the development or delay the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Posted by Craig Jones on 07/15 at 08:50 AM
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Thursday, July 14, 2011

Weight-Loss Surgery Cost-Effective for All Obese

Bariatric surgery is not only cost-effective for treating people who are severely obese, but also for those who are mildly obese, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings support making bariatric surgery available to all obese people, the researchers say.

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Posted by Craig Jones on 07/14 at 10:52 AM
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Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Moderate to Intense Exercise May Protect the Brain

Older people who regularly exercise at a moderate to intense level may be less likely to develop the small brain lesions, sometimes referred to as “silent strokes,” that are the first sign of cerebrovascular disease, according to a new study published in the June 8, 2011, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN).

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Posted by Craig Jones on 06/14 at 02:24 PM
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