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Scientists Identify New Epigenetic Mechanism That Switches Off Placental Genes in Mice

Harvard Medical School researchers have discovered a new regulatory mechanism for genomic imprinting, the process that silences one parent’s gene so that only the other parent’s gene is expressed in offspring.
13-Jul-2017 1:15 PM EDT Add to Favorites

What Babies See

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At a glance: ·Newly published research reveals the presence of a blueprint for the complex visual system already present at birth. ·The observations shed light on a long-standing mystery about how and when certain cardinal features of the visual...
19-Jul-2017 9:00 AM EDT Add to Favorites

Bringing Precision to Medicare Cancer Care

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At a glance: Medicare policies governing end-of-life care for cancer patients may fail to reflect the variety of experiences across different patient subgroups. Researchers have developed a model that accounts for variations in the clinical...
3-Jul-2017 12:00 PM EDT Add to Favorites

Bringing CRISPR Into Focus

Harvard Medical School study generates near-atomic resolution images of key steps in CRISPR-Cas3 function, revealing layers of error detection that prevent unintended genomic damage. Structural understanding informs efforts to improve CRISPR systems...
28-Jun-2017 11:05 AM EDT Add to Favorites

Bird’s Eye Perspective

Chickens may illuminate how humans developed sharp daylight vision
23-Jun-2017 2:05 PM EDT Add to Favorites

Does the Emperor Have Clothes?

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Decades after the discovery of anti-obesity hormone, scant evidence that leptin keeps lean people lean, scientists caution
23-Jun-2017 7:05 AM EDT Add to Favorites

Assembly Failure

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At a glance: Most frequent genetic cause of ALS and a form of dementia (FTD) is known to produce toxic peptides that interfere with RNA splicing—an intermediary step in generating functional proteins from genes. New Harvard Medical School...
12-Jun-2017 12:00 PM EDT Add to Favorites

Low Levels of Vitamin a May Fuel TB Risk

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At a glance: People with low levels of vitamin A living in households with people who have TB were 10 times more likely to develop the disease themselves. The study findings suggest that vitamin A supplementation may offer powerful...
12-Jun-2017 12:05 PM EDT Add to Favorites

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