Feature Channels: Food and Water Safety

Filters close
Newswise: Fast track to food safety: new test spots seafood pathogen in 30 minutes
Released: 16-May-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Fast track to food safety: new test spots seafood pathogen in 30 minutes
Chinese Academy of Sciences

Researchers have developed a groundbreaking point-of-care detection method for Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a bacterium responsible for a significant number of foodborne illnesses. The new platform, leveraging recombinant polymerase amplification (RPA) and the CRISPR/Cas12a system combined with an immunochromatographic test strip (ICS), offers a low-cost, simple, and visually intuitive solution for the rapid detection of this pathogen in seafood.

   
Newswise: UAlbany Scientists Receive Funding to Develop Color-Changing Salmonella Detection Kit
Released: 13-May-2024 1:00 PM EDT
UAlbany Scientists Receive Funding to Develop Color-Changing Salmonella Detection Kit
University at Albany, State University of New York

University at Albany researchers have been awarded $611,000 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture to develop a new, fast-acting tool for Salmonella detection. Similar to the test strips used to measure pH or detect COVID-19, it will display results on a color-changing panel — purple if positive, red if negative. If successful, the test will reduce the time it takes to detect salmonella in food from days to hours, making it possible to quickly implement preemptive measures to prevent human illness and lost revenue.

   
Newswise: Natural biosurfactants: the future of eco-friendly meat preservation
Released: 13-May-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Natural biosurfactants: the future of eco-friendly meat preservation
Chinese Academy of Sciences

Recently, exciting new paper unveils the potential of biosurfactants—natural compounds produced by microbes—to significantly improve the preservation of meat products. This innovative approach could replace synthetic chemicals, enhancing food safety and quality.

Released: 10-May-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Natural biosurfactants: the future of eco-friendly meat preservation
Chinese Academy of Sciences

Recently, exciting new paper unveils the potential of biosurfactants—natural compounds produced by microbes—to dramatically improve the preservation of meat products. This innovative approach could replace synthetic chemicals, enhancing food safety and quality.

Newswise:Video Embedded swarms-of-miniature-robots-clean-up-microplastics-and-microbes-simultaneously-video
VIDEO
3-May-2024 8:00 AM EDT
Swarms of miniature robots clean up microplastics and microbes, simultaneously (video)
American Chemical Society (ACS)

In a study in ACS Nano, researchers describe swarms of microscale robots (microrobots) that captured bits of plastic and bacteria from water. Afterward, the bots were decontaminated and reused.

   
Released: 1-May-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Register for Food and Nutrition Institute’s Fourth Annual Conference on Science, Regulation
Institute for the Advancement of Food and Nutrition Sciences

Event at National Press Club features nutrition, food safety scientists and leaders addressing major issues with a research and regulatory lens.

   
Released: 11-Apr-2024 12:05 PM EDT
New EPA PFAS Ruling: MSU Experts Provide Overview of Changes
Michigan State University

Municipal water systems must remove “forever chemicals” from their tap water under a new rule issued by the Environmental Protection Agency meant to prevent deaths and serious illnesses linked to the substances.

   
Newswise: NAWI Awarded Funding to Continue to Accelerate Research and Development for a Secure Water Future
Released: 11-Apr-2024 11:15 AM EDT
NAWI Awarded Funding to Continue to Accelerate Research and Development for a Secure Water Future
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

The National Alliance for Water Innovation (NAWI), which is led by Berkeley Lab, has been extended for five more years with $75 million in funding fromDOE. NAWI will continue its contributions to helping decarbonize the water and wastewater sectors through investments in technologies that enhance the efficient use of energy for water use, treatment, and distribution.

Newswise: WVU to help fill need for water workforce in Appalachian communities
Released: 10-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
WVU to help fill need for water workforce in Appalachian communities
West Virginia University

A $1.4 million demonstration grant from the U.S. Department of Labor supports the three-year initiative to develop paid summer internship partnerships with water and wastewater utilities serving disadvantaged areas of West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia.

Released: 8-Apr-2024 5:05 AM EDT
10 years later . . . MSU experts are available to comment on what’s next for Flint
Michigan State University

Michigan State University has a long-standing relationship with the city of Flint, Michigan. MSU Extension has been working with people in Genesee County for more than 100 years and continues to offer programs to help residents thrive.

Newswise: SUNY ESF Leads Groundbreaking Research in Groundwater’s Role in Ecosystem Sustainability
Released: 3-Apr-2024 8:05 AM EDT
SUNY ESF Leads Groundbreaking Research in Groundwater’s Role in Ecosystem Sustainability
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Groundwater has been largely unstudied in its importance and role in sustaining ecosystems.

Newswise: UNC Wilmington Among Universities Receiving Instruments for PFAS Research
Released: 28-Mar-2024 11:05 AM EDT
UNC Wilmington Among Universities Receiving Instruments for PFAS Research
University of North Carolina Wilmington

UNC Wilmington faculty have been equipped with a cutting-edge instrument from the North Carolina Collaboratory and Thermo Fisher Scientific to advance research on the impact of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination on the environment and public health.

Released: 27-Mar-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Filters, Coupled with Digital Health Program, Reduced Arsenic Levels by Nearly Half in Study Participants in Households Relying on Well Water in American Indian Communities
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A community-led water-testing project made up of households that rely on private well water with high arsenic levels saw on average a 47 percent drop in participants’ urinary arsenic levels after filters were installed and a digital health program was implemented, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Over the two-year study period, participating households received phone calls to encourage use of the filter and a reminder to replace the filter cartridge.

Released: 21-Mar-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Bar-Ilan University Researchers Develop Cost-Effective Method to Detect Low Concentrations of Pharmaceutical Waste and Contaminants in Water
Bar-Ilan University

Pharmaceutical waste and contaminants present a growing global concern, particularly in the context of drinking water and food safety. Addressing this critical issue, a new study by researchers at Bar-Ilan University’s Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials has resulted in the development of a highly sensitive plasmonic-based detector, specifically targeting the detection of harmful piperidine residue in water.

Released: 18-Mar-2024 11:30 AM EDT
Study Estimates Nearly 70 Percent of Children Under Six in Chicago May Be Exposed to Lead-Contaminated Tap Water
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new analysis led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health estimates that 68 percent of Chicago children under age six live in households with tap water containing detectable levels of lead.

Newswise: Revolutionizing Infant Formula Safety: A New Frontier in Pathogen Detection
Released: 5-Mar-2024 8:05 AM EST
Revolutionizing Infant Formula Safety: A New Frontier in Pathogen Detection
Chinese Academy of Sciences

Cronobacter sakazakii is a harmful germ that can be found in powdered baby formula. It can cause very serious health problems in infants, such as meningitis and septicemia. Right now, it takes a long time and is complicated to check if the germ is in the formula. However, a new study has created a special test that uses a computer program to find the germ in the formula. This new method makes it easier and faster to find the germ, which is known for causing serious illness in babies. It helps make sure that baby formula is safe to use.

29-Feb-2024 12:00 PM EST
Humans have driven the Earth’s freshwater cycle out of its stable state
Aalto University

New analysis shows that the global freshwater cycle has shifted far beyond pre-industrial conditions

Released: 29-Feb-2024 3:05 PM EST
Refrigerate lettuce to reduce risk of E. coli contamination, researchers say
College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Leafy green vegetables are important sources of dietary fiber and nutrients, but they can harbor harmful pathogens. In particular, lettuce has often been involved in outbreaks of foodborne illness across the U.S. A new study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign examines factors that affect E. coli contamination on five different leafy greens – romaine lettuce, green-leaf lettuce, spinach, kale, and collards.

Newswise: Want fewer microplastics in your tap water? Try boiling it first
23-Feb-2024 9:15 AM EST
Want fewer microplastics in your tap water? Try boiling it first
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Want to remove microplastics from water? Try brewing it for a cup of tea or coffee! Research reported in Environmental Science & Technology Letters shows that by boiling then filtering tap water, up to 90% of the nano- and microplastics present could be removed.

Newswise: Early-Life Airborne Lead Exposure Associated with Lower IQ and Self-Control in NIH Study
Released: 23-Feb-2024 7:05 AM EST
Early-Life Airborne Lead Exposure Associated with Lower IQ and Self-Control in NIH Study
Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes NIH

Children who lived in areas with higher levels of airborne lead in their first five years of life appeared to have slightly lower IQs and less self-control, with boys showing more sensitivity to lead exposure, according to a new study from the NIH Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program.

   
Released: 20-Feb-2024 3:05 PM EST
Water quality monitor, locust-inspired electronic nose under development
Washington University in St. Louis

Two teams of engineers led by faculty in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis will work toward developing products to monitor drinking water quality and to detect explosives with an electronic nose with one-year, $650,000 Convergence Accelerator Phase 1 grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Newswise: Fresh Meat: New Biosensor Accurately and Efficiently Determines Meat Freshness
15-Feb-2024 9:05 AM EST
Fresh Meat: New Biosensor Accurately and Efficiently Determines Meat Freshness
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Despite the technological advances keeping meat fresh for as long as possible, certain aging processes are unavoidable. Adenosine triphosphate is a molecule produced by breathing and responsible for providing energy to cells. When an animal stops breathing, ATP synthesis also stops, and the existing molecules decompose into acid, diminishing first flavor and then safety. Hypoxanthine and xanthine are intermediate steps in this transition. Assessing their prevalence in meat indicates its freshness. In AIP Advances, researchers developed a biosensor using graphene electrodes modified by zinc oxide nanoparticles to measure HXA. The team demonstrated the sensor’s efficacy on pork meat.

Newswise: By growing animal cells in rice grains, scientists dish up hybrid food
Released: 14-Feb-2024 9:05 PM EST
By growing animal cells in rice grains, scientists dish up hybrid food
Cell Press

From lab-grown chicken to cricket-derived protein, these innovative alternatives offer hope for a planet struggling with the environmental and ethical impacts of industrial agriculture.

12-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
Ultra-processed foods score worse on food package labelling
University College London

Ultra-processed foods (UPFs) contain more calories, fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt than minimally-processed foods – but not all UPFs are unhealthy, according to new research from UCL.

Newswise: URI Nutrition study to help inform official USDA dietary guidelines
Released: 12-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
URI Nutrition study to help inform official USDA dietary guidelines
University of Rhode Island

Evidence to support the assumption that ultra-processed foods are all bad for one’s health is limited, and the nutritional quality of processed foods has not been considered by official U.S. Department of Agriculture dietary guidelines. University of Rhode Island Nutrition Professor Kathleen Melanson aims to help inform the newest guidelines, due out in 2025, as she begins a nutritional study funded by a $300,000 grant from the USDA.

Newswise: Paper: Multistate foodborne illness outbreaks impact restaurant stock price, public perception
Released: 5-Feb-2024 2:05 PM EST
Paper: Multistate foodborne illness outbreaks impact restaurant stock price, public perception
College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

As demand for food from restaurants soars in the U.S., so does the importance in understanding the impacts of foodborne illness outbreaks. A new paper co-written by a University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign expert in food marketing and food policy finds that outbreaks spanning multiple states bring swift financial losses, increased media attention and a public-relations hit that makes smaller outbreaks more financially damaging.

Newswise: image.jpg
Released: 5-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST
Expert provides food safety tips following charcuterie meat Salmonella outbreak
Virginia Tech

Whether it’s building out a big spread for the Super Bowl or planning a Valentine’s Day meal, lots of people will be heading to the store these next few weeks to stock up on food. One item many might be considering is charcuterie.

Newswise: New options at Dallas food pantry boost food security
Released: 1-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST
New options at Dallas food pantry boost food security
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Nutritious meal kits and no-prep meals improved food security and perceived dietary quality among clients of a Dallas food pantry, according to a pilot study led by UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Released: 1-Feb-2024 9:05 AM EST
What’s on Your Plate?
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

The Food Pyramid that many of us learned about in school is now ancient history. That old guideline on food groups and servings has been replaced by MyPlate.

Newswise: Pandemic Lockdowns and Water Quality: A Revealing Study on Building Usage
Released: 1-Feb-2024 9:05 AM EST
Pandemic Lockdowns and Water Quality: A Revealing Study on Building Usage
Chinese Academy of Sciences

During the COVID-19 pandemic, lower occupancy in buildings led to reduced water use, raising concerns about water quality due to stagnation.

Released: 31-Jan-2024 12:05 PM EST
Detecting hepatitis viruses in wastewater
Ruhr-Universität Bochum

In addition to collecting water samples from the Rhine-Herne canal and the Emscher river over the course of a year, Fiona Rau had access to further wastewater samples from 21 sewage treatment plants in NRW.

   
Released: 30-Jan-2024 2:05 PM EST
Our winter of discontent: Get the latest news on the flu in the Influenza channel
Newswise

The latest research and expertise on the flue can be found in the Influenza channel on Newswise.

Newswise: Single Dose Typhoid Conjugate Vaccine (TCV) Provides Lasting Efficacy in Children
24-Jan-2024 4:05 PM EST
Single Dose Typhoid Conjugate Vaccine (TCV) Provides Lasting Efficacy in Children
University of Maryland School of Medicine

A single dose of the typhoid conjugate vaccine, Typbar TCV®, provides lasting efficacy in preventing typhoid fever in children ages 9 months to 12 years old, according to a new study conducted by researchers at University of Maryland School of Medicine’s (UMSOM) Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD) and led by in-country partners at the Malawi-Liverpool Wellcome Trust (MLW) Clinical Research Programme.

Released: 25-Jan-2024 3:05 PM EST
White House rule dramatically deregulated wetlands, streams and drinking water
University of California, Berkeley

The 1972 Clean Water Act protects the "waters of the United States" but does not precisely define which streams and wetlands this phrase covers, leaving it to presidential administrations, regulators, and courts to decide.

Newswise: A salad space oddity: Lettuce more susceptible to bacterial infections away from Earth
Released: 25-Jan-2024 8:05 AM EST
A salad space oddity: Lettuce more susceptible to bacterial infections away from Earth
University of Delaware

University of Delaware researchers grew lettuce under conditions that imitated the weightless environment aboard the International Space Station and found those plants grown under the manufactured microgravity were more prone to infections from Salmonella.

Released: 19-Jan-2024 1:05 PM EST
Don't wait for an emergency to get the latest emergency medicine news
Newswise

Find the latest research and features on emergency medicine in the Emergency Medicine channel on Newswise.

       
Newswise: 'It was a breath of fresh air' – treatment of rare tumor helps KCH patient feel like herself again
Released: 18-Jan-2024 11:05 AM EST
'It was a breath of fresh air' – treatment of rare tumor helps KCH patient feel like herself again
University of Kentucky

With one smile, 18-year-old Payton Ebertshauer of London can light up any room.

Released: 17-Jan-2024 12:05 PM EST
Penny Pennington Elected Chair of Danforth Plant Science Center Board; New Directors Include Blunt, Burlin
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

ST. LOUIS, MO., January 17, 2023 — The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center announced today that Penny Pennington has been elected chair of the Danforth Center Board of Directors.

Released: 16-Jan-2024 11:05 AM EST
Rice engineers propose hybrid urban water sourcing model
Rice University

Houston’s water and wastewater system could be more resilient with the development of hybrid urban water supply systems that combine conventional, centralized water sources with reclaimed wastewater, according to a study by Rice University engineers published in Nature Water.

Newswise: A roadmap for rescuing Utah's Great Salt Lake
Released: 16-Jan-2024 9:05 AM EST
A roadmap for rescuing Utah's Great Salt Lake
University of Utah

Conserving water won’t be enough to restore the depleted Great Salt Lake, the signature Utah landscape whose existence as a functioning ecosystem remains seriously imperiled from low water levels and rising salinity. Much of the water saved by Utah cities and farms through various conservation measures will have to be allowed to flow into the terminal lake if its levels are to rebound and remain at a safe level, according to Utah’s Great Salt Lake Strike Team. The panel of university and agency experts has released its latest data analysis just ahead of Utah’s upcoming legislative session.



close
2.28736