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9-Jul-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Mind the gap: Even the richest Americans lag the English on health, study finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study shows that middle-aged people living in the U.S. today have worse health than their English counterparts – and that the difference in health between rich and poor is much larger on the American side of the Atlantic.

Newswise: Trade Wars with China Could Cost U.S. Universities $1.15 Billion
10-Jul-2020 6:35 PM EDT
Trade Wars with China Could Cost U.S. Universities $1.15 Billion
University of California San Diego

Uncertainties around the trade war between the U.S. and China have hurt businesses and weighed on the global economy. However, new research from the University of California San Diego also shows lesser known consequence: up to $1.15 billion in reduced tuition to U.S. universities.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Open letter opposing change to the Student and Exchange Visitor Program
American Chemical Society (ACS)

The American Chemical Society (ACS) has signed an open letter to the White House, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Department of State opposing modifications to temporary exemptions for the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP).

Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Statement by AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine on ICE Guidance on International Students and University Online-Only Instruction
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

AERA urges the administration to reverse the ICE guidance and allow international students with valid visas to remain in the United States as their universities strive to find the best path forward to providing a high-quality education while ensuring public health safety.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
University of Münster

Due to border closures in the wake of the corona crisis, the arrival of refugees in Europe has temporarily dipped.

Newswise: Nobel Prize-winning chemist M. Stanley Whittingham named to “Great Immigrants, Great Americans” list for 2020
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Nobel Prize-winning chemist M. Stanley Whittingham named to “Great Immigrants, Great Americans” list for 2020
Binghamton University, State University of New York

M. Stanley Whittingham, a 2019 Nobel Laureate and distinguished professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has been named to the Carnegie Corporation of New York’s 2020 list of “Great Immigrants, Great Americans.”

Newswise: immigration-law-book-photo.jpg
Released: 18-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
WashU Expert: DACA decision lets ‘Dreamers’ breathe a little easier
Washington University in St. Louis

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision June 18 that the Trump Administration cannot shut down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) program will allow more than 700,000 “Dreamers” to worry a bit less and continue focusing on their jobs, education and futures, said an immigration law expert at Washington University in St.

Newswise: Refugee camps vulnerable to COVID-19 outbreaks
10-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Refugee camps vulnerable to COVID-19 outbreaks
PLOS

A COVID-19 outbreak in a refugee settlement will likely overwhelm the available healthcare capacity and infrastructure and spread through nearly the entire settlement population if left unchecked, according to a new study published June 16 in PLOS Medicine by Paul Spiegel of Johns Hopkins University, United States, and colleagues.

Newswise: Refugee Children Get Better Health, Nutrition via e-Vouchers
Released: 11-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Refugee Children Get Better Health, Nutrition via e-Vouchers
Cornell University

Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Released: 9-Jun-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Mexican Immigrant Obesity Rates Climb with Deportation Fears
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Stress, unhealthy foods contribute to obesity in undocumented adults and children, Rutgers study reports

Newswise: Is This the End of DACA?
Released: 9-Jun-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Is This the End of DACA?
Arizona State University (ASU)

ASU Law professor talks about the possible outcomes of the upcoming Supreme Court DACA ruling

Newswise: Walls Are Used by Politicians to Divide Groups of People Even Further, New Book Shows
Released: 8-Jun-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Walls Are Used by Politicians to Divide Groups of People Even Further, New Book Shows
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Walls are used as political tools to accentuate divisions between people, according to a new book co-edited by a faculty member at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Newswise: Cincinnati Children’s Names Vice President of Diversity, Inclusion and Community Relations
Released: 4-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Cincinnati Children’s Names Vice President of Diversity, Inclusion and Community Relations
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center today named Visael “Bobby” Rodriguez as its vice president of diversity, inclusion and community relations.

Newswise: New Visa Restrictions will Make the U.S. Economic Downturn Worse
Released: 4-Jun-2020 5:50 AM EDT
New Visa Restrictions will Make the U.S. Economic Downturn Worse
University of California San Diego

The Trump administration is expected to set limits on a popular program that allows international students to work in the U.S. after graduation while remaining on their student visas. The restrictions are designed to help American graduates seeking jobs; however, the move is likely to further hurt the economy, according to new University of California San Diego research on immigrant rights.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Study shows impact of licensing restrictions on immigrant farmworkers
State University of New York at Geneseo

A three-year study by SUNY Geneseo anthropologists shows that driver licensing restrictions led to increased social isolation and health risks for immigrant agricultural workers. The researchers identified factors that prevent immigrants from leaving farms where they work and the detrimental effects of isolation.

Newswise: New American University Survey Reveals Influence of Race in D.C.-Area Residents’ Lives
Released: 29-May-2020 11:35 AM EDT
New American University Survey Reveals Influence of Race in D.C.-Area Residents’ Lives
American University

A new report from American University shows how race influences Washington, D.C.-area residents’ daily lives and experiences, revealing a stark racial divide in perceptions among Latinos, blacks, whites and Asians about quality-of-life issues within their neighborhoods.

Released: 22-May-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Scientific Groups Seek Change, Cooperation in Response to Immigration Executive Order
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Thirty-six scientific associations and societies are calling on President Trump to reconsider an executive order that suspends the entry of immigrants into the United States. The order seeks to limit the number of foreign workers available in the U.S. job market and makes no exceptions for researchers and students in STEM who are not involved in coronavirus research. The letter points out the critical role of immigrant researchers and students from around the world for the U.S. in retaining our advantage as “the premier destination for the world’s best and brightest minds.”

Newswise: U.S. Border Patrol Agents Leverage Cutting-Edge S&T Tech to Ensure the Safety of Migrants at Our Nation’s Borders
Released: 30-Apr-2020 8:50 AM EDT
U.S. Border Patrol Agents Leverage Cutting-Edge S&T Tech to Ensure the Safety of Migrants at Our Nation’s Borders
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

S&T partnered with U.S. Customs and Border Protection on the Missing Migrants Program, an effort to save lives at the southwest border via rescue beacons and 911 rescue placards.

Released: 29-Apr-2020 9:20 AM EDT
Legal principles assert migrants’ rights during pandemic
Cornell University

A global committee of legal scholars – including Cornell Law School’s Ian Kysel – developed a set of principles released April 28, “Human Mobility and Human Rights in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Principles of Protection for Migrants, Refugees and Other Displaced Persons,” reminding states of their obligations to those populations amid the public health crisis.

Released: 22-Apr-2020 2:15 PM EDT
The Pandemic’s Effect on Undocumented Immigrants’ Health
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A Rutgers expert discusses why immigrants are especially vulnerable during the pandemic

Released: 24-Mar-2020 1:15 PM EDT
COVID-19: The time is now to prepare for people affected by humanitarian crises
Dartmouth College

With over 300,000 COVID-19 cases across the globe, including recent cases in Syria and the Gaza Strip, the data continues to demonstrate how the disease has no borders.

Released: 24-Mar-2020 8:10 AM EDT
How can migration, workforce participation, and education balance the cost of aging in Europe?
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

New IIASA research shows that higher levels of education and increasing workforce participation in both migrant and local populations are needed to compensate for the negative economic impacts of aging populations in EU countries.

Released: 18-Mar-2020 12:05 AM EDT
‘Breastfeeding Gap’ Exists Among Mexican-Origin Women Living in Texas
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Mexican women born and educated in Mexico who now live in Texas breastfeed longer than those born and educated in the United States. That’s the finding from new research from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TxPEP) at The University of Texas at Austin, which points to a “breastfeeding gap” among some Mexican-origin women living in Texas.

Newswise: Noncitizens are undertreated for heart attack, stroke risk factors
Released: 10-Mar-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Noncitizens are undertreated for heart attack, stroke risk factors
University of Illinois at Chicago

A new study shows that noncitizens in the United States are less likely to receive treatment for cardiovascular disease risk factors when compared with born or naturalized U.S. citizens.

Newswise:Video Embedded what-are-green-jobs
VIDEO
Released: 10-Mar-2020 10:10 AM EDT
What Are Green Jobs?
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Green jobs are booming. But what are they? And how can the United States prepare for the future this shift in technologies will bring? This video is part of the Inside the Issues video series, featuring CFR Vice President of Studies Shannon K. O’Neil. Watch as she helps explain and clarify common misconceptions surrounding international issues such as China’s trade practices, green jobs, and immigration.

Newswise:Video Embedded what-automation-means-for-jobs
VIDEO
Released: 10-Mar-2020 9:55 AM EDT
What Automation Means for Jobs
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

When was the last time you went to the mall for something you could buy on your phone? Automation is a disruptive force that continues to shape the future. CFR breaks down what automation means for the U.S. workforce.

Released: 5-Mar-2020 1:20 PM EST
No increase in crime under California’s ‘sanctuary state’ status, UCI study finds
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., March 5, 2020 — The implementation of California Senate Bill 54 – which limits, but does not prohibit, state and local police cooperation with federal immigration authorities – did not cause an increase in crime, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Irvine. This is the first systematic analysis to be conducted on the impact of the measure since California’s “sanctuary state” status went into effect on Jan.

Newswise: Majority of People in a National Survey Oppose Separating Immigrant Families at US/Mexico Border
Released: 5-Mar-2020 9:00 AM EST
Majority of People in a National Survey Oppose Separating Immigrant Families at US/Mexico Border
Baylor University

A clear majority of participants in a national survey about the zero-tolerance policy on the United States/Mexico border strongly oppose separating immigrant families and charging the parents as criminals, according to Baylor University research. Researchers also found that among those who support the family separation policy, the strongest connection is conservative political ideology.

Newswise:Video Embedded pursuing-ph-d-ecuadorian-immigrant-works-to-improve-lives-of-immigrants-through-policy
VIDEO
Released: 12-Feb-2020 9:55 AM EST
Pursuing Ph.D., Ecuadorian immigrant works to improve lives of immigrants through policy
Iowa State University

Twenty years after leaving Ecuador during its economic crisis, Maria Alcívar-Zúñiga learned she had received a prestigious national award recognizing her leadership, academic accomplishments and community work empowering Latinx youth and families in Iowa. Next stop: finishing her dissertation at Iowa State University.

Newswise:Video Embedded a-nation-dangerously-divided-race-shapes-who-wins-and-who-loses-in-u-s-democracy
VIDEO
Released: 10-Feb-2020 7:00 AM EST
A Nation Dangerously Divided: Race Shapes Who Wins and Who Loses in U.S. Democracy
University of California San Diego

Race is shown to be the single most important factor in American democracy, determining which candidates win elections, which voters win at the polls, and who is on the losing end of policy. These conclusions are at the center of a new book Dangerously Divided: How Race and Class Shape Winning and Losing in American Politics,” by Zoltan Hajnal of UC San Diego.

Newswise: U.S. Detention of Child Migrants
Released: 6-Feb-2020 1:45 PM EST
U.S. Detention of Child Migrants
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Record-breaking numbers of unaccompanied children have been arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border, leading the Trump administration to expand child detention policies and sparking debate over how to handle the flow of asylum seekers.

Newswise: Infectious Disease Experts Sound Alarm Over Risk of Outbreaks in U.S. Border Detention Centers
Released: 29-Jan-2020 5:00 PM EST
Infectious Disease Experts Sound Alarm Over Risk of Outbreaks in U.S. Border Detention Centers
University of Maryland School of Medicine

– Over the past year, at least seven children have died from diseases including influenza while being detained by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency. Infectious disease experts at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) called for protections like influenza vaccinations to prevent serious outbreaks.


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