Curated News: Journal of Experimental Medicine

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Newswise: Stopping lung damage before it turns deadly
Released: 9-May-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Stopping lung damage before it turns deadly
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

To treat and prevent these diseases, researchers need to understand why a lack of oxygen would affect the immune system.

Newswise: Discovery of an 'Eat-Me' signal involved in synaptic pruning and maturation of new neurons in the adult brain
15-Mar-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Discovery of an 'Eat-Me' signal involved in synaptic pruning and maturation of new neurons in the adult brain
The Rockefeller University Press

A research group led by Kazunobu Sawamoto, a professor at Nagoya City University and National Institute for Physiological Sciences, and Chihiro Kurematsu, a student at Nagoya City University School of Medicine, has elucidated the mechanism that controls synaptic pruning of new neurons in the adult brain. These findings are expected to be useful in the study of neurological diseases with abnormalities in microglia and synapses, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).

Newswise: Cancer cell's iron addiction may enable specific drug targeting, study suggests
3-Mar-2022 10:30 AM EST
Cancer cell's iron addiction may enable specific drug targeting, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), have discovered that cells carrying the most common mutation found in human cancer accumulate large amounts of ferrous iron and that this “ferroaddiction” can be exploited to specifically deliver powerful anticancer drugs without harming normal, healthy cells. The therapeutic strategy, described in a study to be published March 9 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could be used to treat a wide variety of cancers driven by mutations in the KRAS gene.

23-Feb-2022 3:15 PM EST
New way viruses trigger autoimmunity discovered
Washington University in St. Louis

Studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that roseolovirus can trigger autoimmunity in a previously unknown way: by disrupting the process by which immune cells learn to avoid targeting their own body's cells and tissues.

Newswise: Cancer drug shows promise in treating infants with rare disease that causes tissue overgrowth
19-Jan-2022 11:05 AM EST
Cancer drug shows promise in treating infants with rare disease that causes tissue overgrowth
The Rockefeller University Press

PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS) is a group of rare, incurable disorders caused by mutations in the PIK3CA gene that result in the malformation and overgrowth of various parts of the body. A new report to be published January 26 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) describes the successful treatment of two young infants with PROS using the breast cancer drug alpelisib.

Released: 2-Dec-2021 2:15 PM EST
Immune cells in the brain play key role in relationship between gut microbes and beta-amyloid
University of Chicago Medical Center

Perturbing the gut microbiome with antibiotics during early life leads to a reduction in amyloid plaques in male mice in adulthood — and microglia are a critical component of the effect.

Newswise: Fast-tracked stroke drug for humans shows promise, in mice, that it might also prove a powerful tool against dementia
Released: 1-Dec-2021 10:25 AM EST
Fast-tracked stroke drug for humans shows promise, in mice, that it might also prove a powerful tool against dementia
The Rockefeller University Press

USC study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine shows that experimental drug protects against injury caused by tiny blood clots in the brain’s white matter, which can accumulate over time and lead to cognitive decline

Newswise: By putting cancer cells to sleep, new drug could prevent tumor metastasis
Released: 23-Nov-2021 10:00 AM EST
By putting cancer cells to sleep, new drug could prevent tumor metastasis
The Rockefeller University Press

A new therapeutic approach prevents the growth of metastatic tumors in mice by forcing cancer cells into a dormant state in which they are unable to proliferate. The study, published November 23 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatments that prevent the recurrence or spread of various cancer types, including breast cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

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Released: 10-Nov-2021 10:30 AM EST
Yale researchers develop RNA-based therapy that clears SARS-CoV-2 from mice
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that an RNA molecule that stimulates the body’s early antiviral defense system can protect mice from a range of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatments for COVID-19 in immunocompromised patients, as well as providing an inexpensive therapeutic option for developing countries that currently lack access to vaccines.

Newswise: Researchers demonstrate vaccination approach in mice that could prevent future coronavirus outbreaks
6-Oct-2021 9:40 AM EDT
Researchers demonstrate vaccination approach in mice that could prevent future coronavirus outbreaks
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have developed a vaccination strategy in mice that promotes the production of antibodies that can neutralize not only SARS-CoV-2 but a broad range of other coronaviruses as well. If successfully translated to humans, the approach, to be published October 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, could lead to the development of a next-generation vaccine capable of preventing future coronavirus pandemics.

Released: 22-Jul-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Cell-Analysis Technique Could Combat Tuberculosis
Cornell University

Researchers at Cornell have developed a way to analyze how individual immune cells react to the bacteria that cause tuberculosis. It could pave the way for new vaccine strategies and provide insights into fighting other infectious diseases.

Newswise: Researchers Reverse Emphysema in Mice by Injecting Blood Vessel Wall Cells
14-Jul-2021 10:15 AM EDT
Researchers Reverse Emphysema in Mice by Injecting Blood Vessel Wall Cells
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian in New York have discovered that injecting mice with pulmonary endothelial cells—the cells that line the walls of blood vessels in the lung—can reverse the symptoms of emphysema. The study, which will be published July 21 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), may lead to new treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an inflammatory lung disease associated with smoking that is thought to be the third leading cause of death worldwide.

Released: 15-Jun-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Common cold combats COVID-19
Yale University

Exposure to the rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of the common cold, can protect against infection by the virus which causes COVID-19, Yale researchers have found.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Collaboration controls killers
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude immunologists are researching how effector and killer T cells can be controlled to destroy cancer cells that resist treatment.

Released: 26-May-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Head and neck cancer cells hijack nearby healthy tissue, promoting further invasion of cancer cells
University of Michigan

Up to half of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma will experience tumor recurrence or new tumors—tumors that often spread and are difficult to treat.

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Released: 12-May-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Scientists Identify Source of Weight Gain From Antipsychotics
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – May 12, 2021 – Scientists with UT Southwestern’s Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute have identified the molecular mechanism that can cause weight gain for those using a common antipsychotic medication. The findings, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggest new ways to counteract the weight gain, including a drug recently approved to treat genetic obesity, according to the study, which involved collaborations with scientists at UT Dallas and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology.

Released: 10-May-2021 3:20 PM EDT
Controlling Cholesterol in Microglia Alleviates Chronic Pain, Opioid-Free
University of California San Diego Health

Using a mouse model, researchers discover pivotal role of cholesterol in chronic pain often caused by chemotherapy, and propose novel therapy.

Newswise: allergy-immunology-patient-luke-dr-romberg-3x4.jpg
3-May-2021 12:05 PM EDT
CHOP Researchers Discover New Disease that Prevents Formation of Antibodies
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Using whole exome sequencing, CHOP researchers discovered the genetic mutation responsible for a condition that prevents patients from making B cells and antibodies to fight infections. The study describing the condition, which CHOP researchers named PU.1 Mutated agammaglobulinemia (PU.MA), was published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Released: 19-Apr-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Attacking Aortic Aneurysms Before They Grow
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

New basic science research shows what happens to the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms when you inhibit JMJD3 through both genetics and pharmacology.

Released: 2-Apr-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Unusual mechanism in rare mutation associated with Alzheimer’s uncovered by UChicago researchers
University of Chicago Medical Center

A novel mechanism has been identified that might explain why a rare mutation is associated with familial Alzheimer’s disease in a new study by investigators at the University of Chicago.

29-Mar-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Therapeutic resistance linked to softer tissue environment in breast cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, have discovered that aggressive, triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) can evade treatment by reorganizing and softening the collagen matrix that surrounds the cancer cells. The study, which will be published April 2 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), shows that the softer matrix activates a signaling pathway that promotes the cancer cells’ survival, and suggests that targeting this pathway could enhance the effectiveness of chemo- and radiotherapy in TNBC patients.

Newswise: Quetal.jpg
3-Mar-2021 9:45 AM EST
Targeting mechanosensitive protein could treat pulmonary fibrosis, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have identified a new molecular target that could potentially treat the deadly, aging-related lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The study, which will be published March 10 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting a protein called MDM4 could prevent respiratory failure by initiating a genetic program that removes scar tissue from the lungs.

Released: 2-Mar-2021 3:05 PM EST
Novel Drug Prevents Amyloid Plaques, a Hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and elsewhere have identified a new drug that could prevent AD by modulating, rather than inhibiting, a key enzyme involved in forming amyloid plaques.

Released: 2-Mar-2021 10:00 AM EST
Yale Researchers Identify Tumor Reactive Immune-Cells to help fight against Advanced Melanoma
Yale Cancer Center

According to a new study led by Yale Cancer Center and Department of Neurology researchers, a simple blood draw may be the first step in helping to discover tumor reactive immune or T cells to treat advanced melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. The findings were published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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23-Feb-2021 8:55 AM EST
Potential drug for Alzheimer’s disease prevention shown to be safe and effective in animals
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Massachusetts General Hospital have identified a new drug that could prevent Alzheimer’s disease by modulating, rather than inhibiting, a key enzyme involved in forming amyloid plaques in the brain. The study, which will be published March 2 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), demonstrates that the drug is safe and effective in rodents and monkeys, paving the way for future clinical trials in humans.

Newswise: Balanced T cell response key to avoiding COVID-19 symptoms, study suggests
Released: 1-Mar-2021 10:40 AM EST
Balanced T cell response key to avoiding COVID-19 symptoms, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

By analyzing blood samples from individuals infected with SARS-CoV-2, researchers in Singapore have begun to unpack the different responses by the body’s T cells that determine whether or not an individual develops COVID-19. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that clearing the virus without developing symptoms requires T cells to mount an efficient immune response that produces a careful balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules.

Newswise: Ludwig Cancer Research Study Reveals How Certain Gut Bacteria Compromise Radiotherapy
Released: 26-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST
Ludwig Cancer Research Study Reveals How Certain Gut Bacteria Compromise Radiotherapy
Ludwig Cancer Research

A study led by Ludwig Chicago Co-director Ralph Weichselbaum and Yang-Xin Fu of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center has shown how bacteria in the gut can dull the efficacy of radiotherapy, a treatment received by about half of all cancer patients.

Newswise: SARS-CoV-2 can infect neurons and damage brain tissue, study indicates
Released: 12-Jan-2021 10:05 AM EST
SARS-CoV-2 can infect neurons and damage brain tissue, study indicates
The Rockefeller University Press

Using both mouse and human brain tissue, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect the central nervous system and have begun to unravel some of the virus’s effects on brain cells. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), may help researchers develop treatments for the various neurological symptoms associated with COVID-19.

Newswise: Combined approach could boost breast cancer immunotherapy, study suggests
22-Dec-2020 1:35 PM EST
Combined approach could boost breast cancer immunotherapy, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Activating an immune signaling pathway best known for fighting viral and bacterial infections can boost the ability of genetically engineered T cells to eradicate breast cancer in mice, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina. The study, to be published December 31 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that CAR T cells, which are already used to treat certain blood cancers in humans, may also be successful against solid tumors if combined with other immunotherapeutic approaches.

Newswise: Targeting T cell protein could prevent type 1 diabetes, study suggests
2-Dec-2020 9:50 AM EST
Targeting T cell protein could prevent type 1 diabetes, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine have identified a new therapeutic target to treat patients with type 1 diabetes. The study, which will be published December 9 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), reveals that inhibiting a protein called OCA-B protects mice from type 1 diabetes by limiting the activity of immune cells that would otherwise destroy the pancreas’ insulin-producing β cells.

Newswise: Researchers discover new particle in the blood of septic patients
Released: 4-Dec-2020 1:00 PM EST
Researchers discover new particle in the blood of septic patients
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have found that people with sepsis have never-before-seen particles in their blood. The scientists are the first to show that these particles, called elongated neutrophil-derived structures (ENDS), break off of immune cells and change their shape as they course through the body.

Newswise: Antibody cocktails at low doses could be more effective at treating COVID-19, according to new study
Released: 19-Nov-2020 10:45 AM EST
Antibody cocktails at low doses could be more effective at treating COVID-19, according to new study
The Rockefeller University Press

Pairs of antibodies may be more effective than single antibodies at preventing and treating COVID-19, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The Rockefeller University in New York. The study, published November 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that in addition to blocking SARS-CoV-2’s entry into cells, the antibodies may combat the virus by enlisting various types of white blood cells to fight the infection.

Newswise: A Better Test for the Tumor-Targeting of CAR-T Therapies
Released: 6-Nov-2020 10:00 AM EST
A Better Test for the Tumor-Targeting of CAR-T Therapies
Ludwig Cancer Research

Ludwig Cancer Research scientists have developed a method to significantly improve the preclinical evaluation of chimeric antigen-receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, in which the immune system’s T cells are extracted from a patient, engineered to target a specific tumor-associated molecule and then grown and reinfused for cancer treatment.

Newswise: Acid Reflux Drug Could Help Newborn Babies Recover From Brain Injury, Study Suggests
22-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Acid Reflux Drug Could Help Newborn Babies Recover From Brain Injury, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered a potential way to prevent a lack of oxygen or blood flow from causing long-lasting brain damage in newborn children. The study, which will be published September 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting the histamine H2 receptor with drugs already used to treat acid reflux in infants could help newborns recover from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), a condition that affects over 1 in 1,000 live births and can cause life-long neurological disabilities.

Newswise: DNA webs may drive lung pathology in severe COVID-19
Released: 14-Sep-2020 10:10 AM EDT
DNA webs may drive lung pathology in severe COVID-19
The Rockefeller University Press

Sticky webs of DNA released from immune cells known as neutrophils may cause much of the tissue damage associated with severe COVID-19 infections, according to two new studies published September 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM). The research, conducted by independent groups in Belgium and Brazil, suggests that blocking the release of these DNA webs could be a new therapeutic target for the management of severe forms of COVID-19.

Newswise: Unconventional T cells in severe COVID-19 patients could predict disease outcome
Released: 4-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Unconventional T cells in severe COVID-19 patients could predict disease outcome
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in France have discovered that patients suffering from severe COVID-19 show changes in a class of immune cells known as unconventional T cells. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that monitoring the activity of these cells in the blood of patients could predict the severity and course of the disease.

Newswise: Researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer cells’ immune evasion
20-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer cells’ immune evasion
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered how brain cancer cells increase production of a key protein that allows them to evade the body’s immune system. The study, which will be published August 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting this cellular pathway could help treat the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma, as well as other cancers that are resistant to current forms of immunotherapy.

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27-Jul-2020 3:30 PM EDT
Alzheimer’s protein in blood indicates early brain changes
Washington University in St. Louis

Two decades or more before symptoms arise, plaques of a sticky protein called amyloid begin forming in the brains of people later diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

Newswise: Researchers make significant step toward blood test for Alzheimer’s disease
28-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Researchers make significant step toward blood test for Alzheimer’s disease
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a technique to detect minute amounts of a protein fragment linked to Alzheimer’s disease in the blood. The study, which will be published July 28 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), shows that levels of p-tau-217 are elevated during the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease and could lead to a simple blood test capable of diagnosing the neurodegenerative disorder years before any symptoms begin to appear.

Newswise: Researchers develop new tools to rapidly test activity of anti-coronavirus antibodies
Released: 21-Jul-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Researchers develop new tools to rapidly test activity of anti-coronavirus antibodies
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The Rockefeller University in New York have developed new tools to rapidly test the ability of antibodies to neutralize SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. The approach, described today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), will help researchers understand whether patients are susceptible to reinfection by SARS-CoV-2 and assess the effectiveness of experimental vaccines, as well as develop antibody-based therapies against the disease.

25-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
New Strategy Emerges for Vaccine Against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcal Aureus
NYU Langone Health

Experiments in mice have shown early success in vaccinating them against potentially deadly bacterial infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal aureus, or MRSA, the strain resistant to most drug treatments.

Newswise: Early clinical trial supports tumor cell–based vaccine for mantle cell lymphoma
16-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Early clinical trial supports tumor cell–based vaccine for mantle cell lymphoma
The Rockefeller University Press

A phase I/II clinical trial by researchers at Stanford University suggests that vaccines prepared from a patient’s own tumor cells may prevent the incurable blood cancer mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) from returning after treatment. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), reveals that the vaccines are a safe and effective way to induce the body’s immune system to attack any tumor cells that could cause disease relapse.

Newswise: Preventing pancreatic cancer metastasis by keeping cells “sheltered in place”
5-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Preventing pancreatic cancer metastasis by keeping cells “sheltered in place”
Sanford Burnham Prebys

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that pancreatic cancer metastasis—when tumor cells gain the deadly ability to migrate to new parts of the body—can be suppressed by inhibiting a protein called Slug that regulates cell movement. The study, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, also revealed two druggable targets that interact with Slug and hold promise as treatments that may stop the spread of pancreatic cancer.

Newswise: Fighting Mosquito-Borne Viruses Requires a Precise Balance of Immune Cells
4-Jun-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Fighting Mosquito-Borne Viruses Requires a Precise Balance of Immune Cells
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

In a new study, published June 5, 2020, in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows that antibodies against JEV are “cross-reactive” and can also recognize Zika virus. Unfortunately, these antibodies can actually make Zika cases more severe.

3-Jun-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Scientists Discover that Nicotine Promotes Spread of Lung Cancer to the Brain
Wake Forest Baptist Health

Among people who have the most common type of lung cancer, up to 40% develop metastatic brain tumors, with an average survival time of less than six months.

Newswise: Swelling of Tissues Drives Immune System Activity, UCLA Researchers Find
Released: 2-Jun-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Swelling of Tissues Drives Immune System Activity, UCLA Researchers Find
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A UCLA research team has identified a new paradigm for understanding the regulation of the immune system, potentially paving the way for new approaches to treating infections and immune-related diseases such as type 1 diabetes and certain cancers.

Newswise: Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, Wake Forest study suggests
1-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, Wake Forest study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have discovered that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain, where they can form deadly metastatic tumors. The study, which will be published June 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that nicotine replacement therapies may not be suitable strategies for lung cancer patients attempting to quit smoking. In addition, the researchers show that the naturally occurring drug parthenolide blocks nicotine-induced brain metastasis in mice, suggesting a potential therapeutic option in humans.

Newswise: Researchers identify therapeutic targets to prevent cancer-associated muscle loss
19-May-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Researchers identify therapeutic targets to prevent cancer-associated muscle loss
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center have identified a key cell signaling pathway that drives the devastating muscle loss, or cachexia, suffered by many cancer patients. The study, which will be published May 22 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this pathway with a drug already in phase 2 clinical trials for diabetes could prevent this syndrome.

Newswise: fu.jpg
Released: 6-Mar-2020 3:40 PM EST
Could cancer immunotherapy success depend on gut bacteria?
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Gut bacteria can penetrate tumor cells and boost the effectiveness of an experimental immunotherapy that targets the CD47 protein.

Newswise: Gut bacteria can penetrate tumors and aid cancer therapy, study suggests
2-Mar-2020 8:45 AM EST
Gut bacteria can penetrate tumors and aid cancer therapy, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and University of Chicago have discovered that bacteria that usually live in the gut can accumulate in tumors and improve the effectiveness of immunotherapy in mice. The study, which will be published March 6 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that treating cancer patients with Bifidobacteria might boost their response to CD47 immunotherapy, a wide-ranging anti-cancer treatment that is currently being evaluated in several clinical trials.


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