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Newswise: Preclinical research helps explain why fatty livers are more susceptible to cancer

Article ID: 720900

Preclinical research helps explain why fatty livers are more susceptible to cancer

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Fatty liver disease is contributing to an increase in liver cancer and basic scientists at The University of Texas Health Science at Houston (UTHealth) have new insight as to why.

Released:
16-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT
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Newswise: 213828_web.jpg

Article ID: 720709

Shipment tracking for 'fat parcels' in the body

University of Bonn

Without fat, nothing works in the body: These substances serve as energy suppliers and important building blocks

Released:
14-Oct-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Newswise: NUS Researchers Show Potential Liver Cancer Treatment by Targeting Cancer Stem-Like Cells

Article ID: 720431

NUS Researchers Show Potential Liver Cancer Treatment by Targeting Cancer Stem-Like Cells

National University of Singapore

NUS researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and the N.1 Institute for Health have shown the potential use of small molecule inhibitors to treat advanced liver cancer.

Released:
9-Oct-2019 2:05 AM EDT
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Newswise: Immune Cell Identity Crisis: What Makes a Liver Macrophage a Liver Macrophage?

Article ID: 720119

Immune Cell Identity Crisis: What Makes a Liver Macrophage a Liver Macrophage?

University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers investigated how a type of immune cell called a macrophage becomes specialized to the liver. Their study, published October 3, 2019 in Immunity, sets the stage for understanding how macrophage specialization gets disrupted by — or contributes to — liver disease.

Released:
3-Oct-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 719914

High-fructose + high-fat diet damages mitochondria in the liver increasing risk of fatty-liver disease and metabolic syndrome

Joslin Diabetes Center

BOSTON – (October 1, 2019) – Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have found that high levels of fructose in the diet inhibit the liver’s ability to properly metabolize fat. This effect is specific to fructose. Indeed, equally high levels of glucose in the diet actually improve the fat-burning function of the liver. This explains why high dietary fructose has more negative health impacts than glucose does, even though they have the same caloric content.

Released:
1-Oct-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 719474

Study Suggests New Metabolic Target for Liver Cancer

University of Iowa

Disrupting a metabolic pathway in the liver in a way that creates a more “cancer-like” metabolism actually reduces tumor formation in a mouse model of liver cancer. This surprising finding from a Univ. of Iowa study identifies the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier as a potential target for preventing liver cancer.

Released:
23-Sep-2019 3:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 719279

For people with pre-existing liver disease, toxic algae may be more dangerous

University of Toledo

Toxins produced during harmful algal blooms may be more harmful to people than previously known.

Released:
19-Sep-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Newswise: $1.25 Million Gift to Endow Chair at Jersey Shore University Medical Center

Article ID: 718817

$1.25 Million Gift to Endow Chair at Jersey Shore University Medical Center

Hackensack Meridian Health

The Hackensack Meridian Health Jersey Shore University Medical Center Foundation is pleased to announce a gift of $1.25 million from Charles Adell to create The Charles & Jackie Adell Endowed Chair in Surgical Oncology at Jersey Shore University Medical Center.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 718453

By comparing needles to mosquitoes, new model offers insights into Hepatitis C solutions

Brown University

By comparing needles and syringes to disease-carrying mosquitoes, an innovative mathematical model of how the Hepatitis C virus spreads is offering scientists new perspectives on how best to prevent its proliferation.

Released:
4-Sep-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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