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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Feb-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689960

Earliest Cave Paintings Were Made by Neanderthals, Scientists Discover

University of Southampton

Scientists have found the first major evidence that Neanderthals made cave paintings, indicating they may have had an artistic sense similar to our own.

Released:
22-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
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Archaeology and Anthropology, Evolution and Darwin, History, Featured: DailyWire, All Journal News

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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2018 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689814

Ancient DNA Tells Tales of Humans’ Migrant History

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Fueled by advances in analyzing DNA from the bones of ancient humans, scientists have dramatically expanded the number of samples studied – revealing vast and surprising migrations and genetic mixing of populations in our prehistoric past.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 9:45 AM EST
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Archaeology and Anthropology, Genetics, History, Featured: DailyWire, Evolution and Darwin, Nature (journal), Local - Maryland, Local - DC Metro, All Journal News

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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Feb-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689190

One Hour of Video Gaming Can Increase the Brain’s Ability to Focus

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Researchers at the University of Arkansas and the Ministry of Education of China studied expert and non-expert video game players and observed that both groups showed an increase in visual selective attention after only one hour of video game play.

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8-Feb-2018 5:00 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Cognition and Learning, Gaming, Neuro, Featured: DailyWire, All Journal News

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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689335

Middle Earth Preserved in Giant Bird Dung

University of Adelaide

While the giant birds that once dominated New Zealand are all extinct, a study of their preserved dung (coprolites) has revealed many aspects of their ancient ecosystem, with important insights for ongoing conservation efforts.

Released:
12-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST
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All Journal News, Birds, Environmental Science, Genetics, Dinosaurs, Paleontology, Featured: DailyWire

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Article ID: 688885

High Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation Linked to Tumor Activity in Male Rats

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

High exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) in rodents resulted in tumors in tissues surrounding nerves in the hearts of male rats, but not female rats or any mice, according to draft studies from the National Toxicology Program (NTP). The exposure levels used in the studies were equal to and higher than the highest level permitted for local tissue exposure in cell phone emissions today. Cell phones typically emit lower levels of RFR than the maximum level allowed. NTP’s draft conclusions were released today as two technical reports, one for rat studies and one for mouse studies. NTP will hold an external expert review of its complete findings from these rodent studies March 26-28.

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2-Feb-2018 12:50 PM EST
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Cancer, Environmental Health, Public Health, Technology, Featured: DailyWire

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Article ID: 688748

Reconstructing an Ancient Lethal Weapon

University of Washington

University of Washington researchers reconstructed prehistoric projectiles and points from ancient sites in what is now Alaska and studied the qualities that would make for a lethal hunting weapon. By examining and testing different projectile points, the team has come to a new understanding about the technological choices people made in ancient times.

Released:
31-Jan-2018 1:05 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Featured: DailyWire

  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688681

‘Anxiety Cells’ Identified in the Brain’s Hippocampus

Columbia University Medical Center

Researchers have identified cells that indicate anxiety in the brains of mice.

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30-Jan-2018 1:05 PM EST
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Mental Health, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry, Cell Biology, Local - New York, Local - New York Metro, All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Featured: DailyWire

  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jan-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688219

Scientists Discover Oldest Known Modern Human Fossil Outside of Africa

Binghamton University, State University of New York

A large international research team, led by Israel Hershkovitz from Tel Aviv University and including Rolf Quam from Binghamton University, State University of New York, has discovered the earliest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa. The finding suggests that modern humans left the continent at least 50,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Released:
22-Jan-2018 9:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 688022

Climate Engineering, Once Started, Would Have Severe Impacts if Stopped

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Facing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying would have a severe global impact on animals and plants, according to the first study on the potential biological impacts of geoengineering, or climate intervention.

Released:
18-Jan-2018 11:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 688209

Double Trouble: Moisture, Not Just Heat Impacts Sex of Sea Turtle Hatchlings

Florida Atlantic University

Male sea turtles are disappearing and not just in Australia. FAU researchers found that 97 to 100 percent of hatchlings in southeast Florida have been female since 2002. They are the first to show why and how moisture conditions inside the nest in addition to heat affect the development and sex ratios of turtle embryos, using a novel technique they developed to estimate sex ratios with a male-specific, transcriptional molecular marker Sox9.

Released:
22-Jan-2018 9:00 AM EST
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