Washington D.C. – Join us for a series of webinars on gut microbiome research.

First Gut Microbiome Webinar:

Quantitative Microbiome Profiling and Identification of a Cross-Disease Enterotype Linked to Depression and Wellbeing

March 3, 2021 10:30 am – 11:30 am ET

Speaker:

Dr. Jeroen Raes, KU Leuven

Register here.

Description:

Alterations in the gut microbiota have been linked to various pathologies, ranging from inflammatory bowel disease and diabetes to cancer. Although large numbers of clinical studies aiming at microbiome-based disease markers are currently being performed, our basic knowledge about the normal variability of the human intestinal microbiota and its determining factors remains limited. Here, Dr. Raes will discuss his findings studying a large-scale study (3,400 subjects) of the gut microbiome variation in a geographically confined region of Flanders, Belgium, in which analysis of microbiome variability in health identified the primary parameters associated to microbiome composition. In this presentation, Dr. Raes will discuss his laboratory’s experiences in large-scale microbiome monitoring, how the development of dedicated computational approaches can assist in microbiome analysis and interpretation, and which confounders are essential for inclusion in microbiome disease research. The presentation will address how Quantitative Microbiome Profiling is profoundly changing our view on gut microbiota variation and has allowed the identification of an inflammation-associated, cross-disease enterotype.

This webinar is free and open to the public. Register here.

Learn more about the IAFNS Gut Microbiome Committee.

 

Second Gut Microbiome Webinar:

The One You Feed: Identifying Specific Interactions of Dietary Fiber Structures and the Microbiota That Ferment Them

March 24, 2021 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm ET 

Speaker:

Dr. Stephen Lindemann, Purdue University

Register here.

Description:

The gut microbiome is known to respond rapidly to dietary changes, but the idiosyncrasy and dynamics of individuals’ gut microbiota make predictive understanding of the impact of diet on the structure and function of gut microbiota elusive. Dietary fibers are increasingly appreciated for their role in preserving microbiome – and gut – health, but this nutrient category historically contains multitudes of different polysaccharide structures, which may (or may not) behave similarly in the influence on the gut. Given that American diets are woefully short of dietary fibers and consumption patterns are relatively recalcitrant to change, are there specific fibers that can be identified to consistently have outsized functional impact on gut health (i.e. be more impactful than others)? In this presentation, Dr. Lindemann will discuss his laboratory’s research on how both fine physical and chemical dietary fiber structure matters in interaction with gut microbiota, both with respect to composition and function, and the potential implications for gut health at precision and population scales.

 

This webinar is free and open to the public. Register here.

Learn more about the IAFNS Gut Microbiome Committee.