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Article ID: 708295

Common Acid Reflux Medications Linked to Increased Kidney Disease Risk

University of California San Diego Health

Mining a large database of adverse reactions to medications, UC San Diego researchers found that people who took proton pump inhibitors (e.g., Prilosec, Nexium) for heartburn and acid reflux were more likely to experience kidney disease than people who took other forms of antacid.

Released:
19-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
Embargo will expire:
21-Feb-2019 6:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
18-Feb-2019 6:00 AM EST

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Article ID: 708132

Men’s Porn Habits Could Fuel Partners’ Eating Disorders, Study Suggests

Ohio State University

A woman whose boyfriend or husband regularly watches pornography is more likely to report symptoms of an eating disorder, new research suggests. In addition to finding an association between a partner’s porn habits and eating disorder symptoms, the research also found a higher incidence of those symptoms in women who said they feel pressure from their boyfriends or husbands to be thin.

Released:
14-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Feb-2019 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 707797

Chronic Inflammation in Middle Age May Lead to Thinking and Memory Problems Later

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People who have chronic inflammation in middle-age may develop problems with thinking and memory in the decades leading up to old age, according to a new study published in the February 13, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
8-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 707982

Ora-curcumin formulation on its way to health product market

South Dakota State University

A unique formulation will allow the development of nutraceutical products by increasing the bioavailability of curcumin, a powerful anti-inflammatory, through the start-up company Turmeric Ultra Inc.

Released:
12-Feb-2019 1:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 707868

NYU Langone Hospital–Brooklyn Addresses Growing Need for Specialized Gastrointestinal Treatment in the Borough

NYU Langone Health

Sam Serouya, MD, joins NYU Langone Hospital–Brooklyn as a gastroenterologist specializing in advanced therapeutic endoscopy to better detect and evaluate digestive disorders and diseases.

Released:
11-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 707834

Could energy overload drive cancer risk?

Santa Fe Institute

By providing an over-abundance of energy to cells, diseases like obesity and diabetes might super-charge growth and cause cells to become cancerous.

Released:
11-Feb-2019 7:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 707619

Aspirin to Prevent Colon Cancer Underutilized in High Risk Patients

Florida Atlantic University

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concluded that aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal cancer by 40 percent as well as recurrence of advanced polyps, which are a major risk factor. To explore whether high risk patients are adhering to USPSTF guidelines, FAU researchers analyzed data from structured interviews with 84 patients and found that less than half (42.9 percent) reported taking aspirin. These findings pose major challenges that require multifactorial approaches by physicians and patients.

Released:
7-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 707623

Cannabinoid compounds may inhibit growth of colon cancer cells

Penn State College of Medicine

Penn State College of Medicine researchers say some cannabinoid compounds may inhibit the growth of colon cancer cells in the lab.

Released:
6-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST

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