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Embargo will expire:
20-Dec-2018 10:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
17-Dec-2018 8:05 PM EST

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 705524

New approach to bowel cancer analysis could lead to better prognosis for patients

Queen's University Belfast

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have discovered a new way to analyse bowel cancer tumours, which could lead to more personalised treatments and better prognosis for patients.

Released:
17-Dec-2018 10:05 AM EST
Surgery_hospital_girl_iStock-638892150.jpg

Article ID: 705394

Malnutrition Common in Children with Crohn’s Disease Increases Risk For Post-Operative Complications

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Results of a medical records study of children with Crohn’s disease by Johns Hopkins researchers have added substantial evidence for a strong and direct link between malnutrition and increased risk of surgical complications and poor outcomes.

Released:
17-Dec-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 705293

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal Jan 2019 Video Abstracts and Editor Picks

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal Jan 2019 Video Abstracts and Editor Picks

Released:
17-Dec-2018 8:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Dec-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 705443

New RNA sequencing strategy provides insight into microbiomes

University of Chicago Medical Center

In a new study published in Nature Communications, a team of scientists from UChicago demonstrated the application of tRNA sequencing to gut microbiome samples from mice that were fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 1:05 PM EST
Embargo will expire:
18-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
14-Dec-2018 9:00 AM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Article ID: 705367

Loss of Tight Junction Protein Promotes Development of Precancerous Cells

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

BIDMC researchers demonstrated that the lack of claudin 18 prompts the development of precancerous, abnormal cells and polyps in the engineered mouse model.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 4:05 PM EST

Article ID: 705343

Gut hormone increases response to food

McGill University

The holiday season is a hard one for anyone watching their weight. The sights and smells of food are hard to resist. One factor in this hunger response is a hormone found in the stomach that makes us more vulnerable to tasty food smells, encouraging overeating and obesity.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 1:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Dec-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 705302

High-Dose Antipsychotics Place Children at Increased Risk of Unexpected Death

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Children and young adults without psychosis who are prescribed high-dose antipsychotic medications are at increased risk of unexpected death, despite the availability of other medications to treat their conditions, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published today in JAMA Psychiatry.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 9:30 AM EST

Article ID: 705305

Exercise Following Weight Loss May Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds

American Physiological Society (APS)

New research suggests that exercise is a key factor in reducing colorectal cancer risk after weight loss. According to the study, physical activity causes beneficial changes in the bone marrow. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 10:00 AM EST

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