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Nyu Langone, Martin Blaser, Microbiome, IBD, bowel disease

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Nov-2017 11:00 AM EST

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Science

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Health, Medicine, Gastroenterology, Biostatistics

Penn Medicine’s Anil K. Rustgi and Hongzhe Li Named 2017 AAAS Fellows

  PHILADELPHIA—Anil K. Rustgi, MD, chief of the division of Gastroenterology and T. Grier Miller Professor of Medicine and Genetics, and Hongzhe Li, PhD, a professor of biostatistics in Biostatistics and Epidemiology, both at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science.

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Colorectal Cancer, Colorectal Cancer Screening, American Cancer Society, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Health and University Hospital Unite with the American Cancer Society in the Fight Against Colorectal Cancer

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Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Health, and University Hospital have committed to increasing colorectal cancer screening across New Jersey by joining a national effort with the American Cancer Society in the fight against this disease.

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease, IBD, Tumor Necrosis Factor, TNF

Study to Examine How Tumor Necrosis Factor Works to Reduce Intestinal Inflammation

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An investigator at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, has been awarded $1.5 million by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the NIH for the study of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

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Science

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Alzheimber's Disease, Alzheimer, Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, Gut Bacteria, Rutgers, Rutgers Univeristy , Disease Progression

Age and Gut Bacteria Contribute to MS Disease Progression, According to Rutgers Study

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29078267

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Preemies Activism, Craniofacial Conditions, New Therapy Lessons, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

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Science

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The One Gene, Menu Labeling, Holiday Food Stress, and More in the Obesity News Source

Click here to go directly to Newswise's Obesity News Source

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Diabetes & Endocrinology, Diabetes, bioartificial pancreas, Pancreas Transplant

Can a Common Ingredient in Laundry Detergent Help Advance Diabetes Research?

Being able to build a bioartificial pancreas offers the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. A major challenge with the effort is how to supply the structure with enough oxygen to keep the cells alive. Now, new research suggests that oxygen-generating compounds found in some laundry detergents may play a key role.

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Microbiome, Crohn's Diesease, Gastroenterology, bacterial enzyme

A Clean Slate: Engineering the Gut Microbiome with “Good” Bacteria May Help Treat Crohn’s Disease

Penn Medicine researchers have singled out a bacterial enzyme behind an imbalance in the gut microbiome linked to Crohn’s disease. The new study, published online this week in Science Translational Medicine, suggests that wiping out a significant portion of the bacteria in the gut microbiome, and then re-introducing a certain type of “good” bacteria that lacks this enzyme, known as urease, may be an effective approach to better treat these diseases.

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cancer, , gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma, extensive genetic variation , genetic instability , metastatic sites

Wider Sampling of Tumor Tissues May Guide Drug Choice, Improve Outcomes

By focusing on genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic tumor, and additional diversity from tumor DNA in the blood stream, physicians can make better treatment choices for patients with gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma. This study challenges current guidelines and supports evaluation of metastatic lesions and circulating tumor DNA.”







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