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Article ID: 689887

Five Novel Genetic Changes Linked to Pancreatic Cancer Risk

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In what is believed to be the largest pancreatic cancer genome-wide association study to date, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute, and collaborators from over 80 other institutions worldwide discovered changes to five new regions in the human genome that may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer.

Released:
21-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST
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All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Cancer, Digestive Disorders, Nature (journal), Local - Maryland

  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2018 6:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689795

Similarities Found in Cancer Initiation in Kidney, Liver, Stomach, Pancreas

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that when mature cells transition to begin dividing again, they all seem to do it the same way, regardless of what organ those cells come from.

Released:
19-Feb-2018 3:55 PM EST
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Cancer, Cell Biology, Digestive Disorders, Kidney Disease, All Journal News

Article ID: 689807

Gut Reactions to Improve Probiotics

Biophysical Society

Researchers at Stanford University are studying how bacteria living in the gut respond to common changes within their habitat, working with mice. They change the gut environment within the mice, and then measure which bacterial species survive the change and how the gut environment itself has changed. They also study the physiological response of the bacteria -- if they grow faster or slower, or produce different proteins. The work was presented during the Biophysical Society Meeting, held Feb. 17-21.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 7:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Digestive Disorders, Physics, Local - Maryland, Local - DC Metro, Scientific Meetings

Article ID: 689769

Celiac Disease Diagnosis Takes 3.5 Years for Patients Without GI Symptoms

Loyola University Health System

It takes an average of 3.5 years to diagnose celiac disease in patients who do not report gastrointestinal symptoms, a Loyola Medicine study has found. Patients who reported gastrointestinal symptoms were diagnosed in an average of 2.3 months.

Released:
19-Feb-2018 12:25 PM EST
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Digestive Disorders, Local - Illinois, Local - Chicago Metro, All Journal News

  • Embargo expired:
    14-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689043

Leading Cancer Organizations Provide Guidance on Understanding and Managing Immunotherapy Side Effects

National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

New guidelines developed collaboratively by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) offer clinicians much needed recommendations for assessment and management of side effects related to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, Digestive Disorders, Immunology, Kidney Disease, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, Local - Pennsylvania

  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689026

Words Do Matter: A Reminder to Practice Empathy

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

In the March issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, Philip Gordon MD, a past president of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons and author of one of the field’s major textbooks, describes his personal experiences on the “receiving” end of chemotherapy. This is in contrast to dispensing advice to colorectal cancer patients on whether or not to pursue chemotherapy, something he had done for most of his career as a colon and rectal surgeon.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, Digestive Disorders, Surgery

  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689072

Is Your Child in Excellent or Very Good Health? If Not, Read On...

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

According to 2015 National Health Interview Survey data published by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, it is estimated that about 85% of children under the age of 18 are in excellent or very good health. What happens to the rest? Many are considered “Children with Special Healthcare Needs” (CSHCN) and have special health care requirements, perhaps due to common chronic conditions of childhood such as asthma, autism spectrum disorders, or uncommon ones as described in the March issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum. Dr. Sarah Cairo and her colleagues from the Delivery of Surgical Care Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Surgery, discuss the unique situation facing pediatric patients with congenital anal rectal malformations as they grow older and face the transition from pediatric to adult health care. This article and topic have wide-reaching implications for countless other medical problems that affect the pediatric age group.

Released:
9-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST
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All Journal News, Children's Health, Digestive Disorders, Family and Parenting

  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689106

Managing Postoperative Pain in the Cancer Patient

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

In the March issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, surgeons from Australia discuss postoperative pain control pain control following one of the most extensive operations performed for pelvic cancer. In an era where many studies have shown that patients do better after surgery with use of lesser amounts of opioid pain medication, this can be particularly challenging in those patients who have taken a significant amount of pain medication before surgery. This is exactly what was shown in this study.

Released:
9-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, Digestive Disorders, Pain

  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689200

Which Patients with Diverticulitis Require Surgery?

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

In the March issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, surgeons from Birmingham, England, studied 5 years of National Health Service data of patients admitted for acute diverticulitis in an effort to identify factors associated with the need for elective or emergency surgery. The authors quote 2004 statistics citing that diverticular disease is responsible for over 300,000 annual hospital admissions and 1.5 million days of inpatient care at a cost of $ 2.6 billion!

Released:
9-Feb-2018 9:00 AM EST
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All Journal News, Digestive Disorders, Surgery

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Article ID: 689305

Clock Protein Controls Daily Cycle of Gene Expression by Regulating Chromosome Loops

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

It’s well known that the human body functions on a 24-hour, or circadian, schedule. The up-and-down daily cycles of a long-studied clock protein called Rev-erb coordinates the ebb and flow of gene expression by tightening and loosening loops in chromosomes, according to new research.

Released:
9-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, Cardiovascular Health, Digestive Disorders, Local - Pennsylvania, Grant Funded News


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