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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Oct-2018 6:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 702154

How Animals Use Their Tails to Swish and Swat Away Insects

Georgia Institute of Technology

A new study shows how animals use their tails to keep mosquitoes at bay by combining a swish that blows away most of the biting bugs and a swat that kills the ones that get through.

Released:
14-Oct-2018 7:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 702243

Marker May Help Target Treatments for Crohn’s Patients

Cornell University

Crohn’s disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the intestinal tract, has emerged as a global disease, with rates steadily increasing over the last 50 years. Experts have long suspected that CD likely represents a collection of related but slightly different disorders, but until now it has not been possible to predict accurately which subtype of CD a patient is likely to develop. In a study published Oct. 4 in the journal JCI Insight, Cornell University and University of North Carolina researchers report they have pinpointed a single molecule – microRNA-31 (miR-31) – the levels of which predict whether a patient has subtype 1 or subtype 2 of the disease.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 4:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 702232

Scientists Study Transition to College to Improve Student Wellbeing

Arizona State University (ASU)

Researchers at ASU tracked how student relationships with parents and friends affected the transition to college. A goal of the study is to prevent students from experiencing depression or anxiety during the transition to college.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 4:10 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 702231

Us vs. Them: Understanding the Neurobiology of Stereotypes

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a review published in the journal Trends in Cognitive Science, Alvaro Pascual-Leone, MD, PhD, and colleagues describe how non-invasive brain stimulation – a technique he and others have pioneered to unlock the secrets of the brain – could shed light on the neurobiology underlying implicit bias.

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15-Oct-2018 4:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 702246

HIV-Positive Infants Are at High Risk for Acquiring Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

FINDINGS Infants born to HIV-positive mothers had high rates of congenital cytomegalovirus, or CMV. Infants who also were infected before birth by the virus that causes AIDS were especially prone to CMV infection. The researchers found that 23 percent of the infants who became infected with HIV during the mother’s pregnancy also were infected with CMV; 18 percent who were infected with HIV either during pregnancy or birth acquired congenital CMV; and 4.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
17-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
15-Oct-2018 4:05 PM EDT

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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Oct-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 701609

Patient-controlled epidural anesthesia after C-section may reduce oral opioid use

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

Women who deliver their babies via cesarean section (C-section) are less likely to need opioids to manage post-delivery pain if they receive ongoing epidural analgesia (pain relief) that they can control, suggests first-of-its kind research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2018 annual meeting.

Released:
8-Oct-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 702219

Costs of Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program May Exceed Reimbursements

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

For some healthcare providers – especially those serving racial/ethnic minority and low-income patients – the costs of delivering a new Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) may be much higher than the expected reimbursement, reports a study in the November issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 702215

Two Degrees Decimated Puerto Rico’s Insect Populations

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

While temperatures in the tropical forests of northeastern Puerto Rico have climbed two degrees Celsius since the mid-1970s, the biomass of arthropods – invertebrate animals such as insects, millipedes, and sowbugs – has declined by as much as 60-fold, according to new findings published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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