Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Discussed April 10

Released: 27-Mar-2014 1:45 PM EDT
Source Newsroom: University of Louisville
Contact Information

Available for logged-in reporters only

Newswise — LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Many times parodied in popular culture, obsessive-compulsive disorder or OCD is actually an anxiety-laden, sometimes even frightening condition causing repeated unwanted thoughts and strongly ritualistic behavior. A University of Louisville psychologist will present a public talk that provides information for OCD patients and their families to cope with the disorder.

“Understanding Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Multitude of Distressing Thoughts and Rituals” will be presented by Monnica Williams, Ph.D., Thursday, April 10 at 7 p.m. at Second Presbyterian Church, 3701 Old Brownsboro Road. Admission is free.

The lecture is a part of the “Building Hope” public lecture series sponsored by the University of Louisville Depression Center, Kentuckiana’s leading resource for depression and bipolar disorder treatment, research and education.

People with OCD feel the need to check things repeatedly, or have certain thoughts or perform routines and rituals over and over, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. The thoughts and rituals associated with OCD cause distress and get in the way of daily life.

The frequent upsetting thoughts are called obsessions. To try to control them, a person will feel an overwhelming urge to repeat certain rituals or behaviors called compulsions. People with OCD can't control these obsessions and compulsions, and most of the time, the rituals end up controlling them.

Williams will discuss the symptoms of OCD and the various ways in which it affects patients. She will cover the effective treatment approaches for OCD currently available, and provide information on ways family members of patients with OCD can be supportive.

Williams is assistant professor and associate director of the Center for Mental Health Disparities in UofL’s Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

For more information, contact the Depression Center at (502) 813-6606.


Comment/Share