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Medicine

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Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, Endocrinology, Metabolism, Metabolic Conditions, Exosome, Cell Biology, Genetics

Exosomes are the Missing Link to Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

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Chronic tissue inflammation resulting from obesity is an underlying cause of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. But the mechanism by which this occurs has remained cloaked, until now. In a paper, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified exosomes — extremely small vesicles or sacs secreted from most cell types — as the missing link.

Medicine

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Hip implants, orthopaedics, ARMD, hip implants

Implant-Specific Blood Metal Ion Levels Can Effectively Identify Patients at Low Risk of Adverse Reactions after 'Metal on Metal' Hip Replacement

Patients with "metal on metal" (MoM) artificial hips are at risk of complications caused by adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD). A study in the September 20, 2017 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery confirms that blood metal .

Medicine

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pediatric cancer patients, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Pediatric Obesity

Study Shows Diet and Exercise Improve Treatment Outcomes for Obese Pediatric Cancer Patients

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Diet and exercise may improve treatment outcomes in pediatric cancer patients, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Science

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HPC, High Performace Computing, Computing, Materials

Los Alamos Gains Role in High-Performance Computing for Materials Program

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A new high-performance computing initiative announced this week by the U.S. Department of Energy will help U.S. industry accelerate the development of new or improved materials for use in severe environments.

Science

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soil health, Nematode, Organic Matter, Ecology

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Sep-2017 9:00 AM EDT

Medicine

Life

Education

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Concussion, concussion care, mTBI, traumatic brain injuries, Traumatic Brain Injury, traumatic brain injury rehab, Traumatic Brain Injury Research, pediatrcs, Return to School

Studies Inconsistent on When Concussed Students Should Return to Learn, Policies and Protocols May Be Needed

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Reintegration into school has been a noticeably neglected area of focus in concussion research, particularly in comparison to research on return-to-play. When and how a student should be fully integrated into the classroom are just two questions UAB and Children’s of Alabama researchers are looking to answer.

Medicine

Science

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gene activation, Genetics, Cell And Developmental Biology, DNA, Leukemia, Lymphoma

Locking Down the Big Bang of Immune Cells

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Scientists have found that ignored pieces of DNA play a critical role in the development of immune cells (T cells). These areas activate a change in the structure of DNA that brings together crucial elements necessary for T cell formation. This “big bang” discovery may aid in combating diseases.

Science

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Jellyfish, Sleep, Cassiopea, Caltech, Paul Sternberg, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Circadian Rhythm

Signs of Sleep Seen in Jellyfish

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The upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea demonstrates the three hallmarks of sleep and represents the first example of sleep in animals without a brain, HHMI researchers report.

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Scientists Sequence Asexual Tiny Worm—Whose Lineage Stretches Back 18 Million Years

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A team of scientists has sequenced, for the first time, a tiny worm that belongs to a group of exclusively asexual species that originated approximately 18 million years ago—making it one of the oldest living lineages of asexual animals known.

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Birds, Evolution, Mass Extinction, Lab of Ornithology

Dino-Killing Asteroid's Impact on Bird Evolution

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Human activities could change the pace of evolution, similar to what occurred 66 million years ago when a giant asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs, leaving modern birds as their only descendants. That's one conclusion drawn by the authors of a new study published in Systematic Biology.







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