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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Feb-2018 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689523

Lack of Guidance May Delay a Child’s First Trip to the Dentist

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Without a doctor or dentist’s guidance, some parents don’t follow national recommendations for early dental care for their children, a new national poll finds.

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14-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
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Children's Health, Oral Health

  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2018 5:30 PM EST

Article ID: 689672

Why Bees Soared and Slime Flopped as Inspirations for Systems Engineering

Georgia Institute of Technology

Honeybee behavior inspired a web hosting algorithm that saved significant costs. Nature can serve as a wonderful model for engineering, but it can also flop. Take slime mold: As a model for connectivity, it falls flat in comparison with classical algorithms.

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16-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689604

Ras Protein’s Role in Spreading Cancer

Biophysical Society

Protein systems make up the complex signaling pathways that control whether a cell divides or, in some cases, metastasizes. Ras proteins have long been the focus of cancer research because of their role as “on/off switch” signaling pathways that control cell division and failure to die like healthy cells do. Now, a team of researchers has been able to study precisely how Ras proteins interact with cell membrane surfaces.

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15-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689597

Using Mutant Bacteria to Study How Changes in Membrane Proteins Affect Cell Functions

Biophysical Society

Phospholipids are water insoluble “building blocks” that define the membrane barrier surrounding cells and provide the structural scaffold and environment where membrane proteins reside. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, William Dowhan from the University of Texas-Houston McGovern Medical School will present his group’s work exploring how the membrane protein phospholipid environment determines its structure and function.

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15-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689568

What Makes Circadian Clocks Tick?

Biophysical Society

Circadian clocks arose as an adaptation to dramatic swings in daylight hours and temperature caused by the Earth’s rotation, but we still don’t fully understand how they work. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, Andy LiWang, University of California, Merced, will present his lab’s work studying the circadian clock of blue-green colored cyanobacteria. LiWang’s group discovered that how the proteins move hour by hour is central to cyanobacteria’s circadian clock function.

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14-Feb-2018 3:25 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689546

Studying Mitosis’ Structure to Understand the Inside of Cancer Cells

Biophysical Society

Cell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers assemble the spindle fibers that separate the copying chromosomes of DNA. While scientists are familiar with MTOCs’ existence and the role they play in cell division, their actual physical structure remains poorly understood. Researchers are now trying to decipher their molecular architecture, and they will present their work during the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21.

Released:
14-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689675

Stretchable Electronics a 'Game Changer' for Stroke Recovery Treatment

Northwestern University

A new throat sensor is the latest in engineering professor John Rogers' growing portfolio of stretchable electronics that are precise enough for use in advanced medical care and portable enough to be worn outside the hospital, even during extreme exercise.

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16-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST
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Neuro, Technology, Local - Illinois, Local - Chicago Metro, Medical Meetings, Biotech, Engineering

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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689685

Research Team Uncovers Hidden Details in Picasso Blue Period Painting

Northwestern University

Art and science researchers uncover details hidden beneath the visible surface of Pablo Picasso’s “La Miséreuse accroupie.” Analysis shows that Picasso painted over another artist’s painting of a landscape and that Picasso altered his own painting, painting a shawl over what once showed a hand.

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16-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689683

Unprecedented Study of Picasso's Bronzes Uncovers New Details

Northwestern University

An international collaboration of art and science researchers use cutting-edge portable instruments to analyze world-renowned Pablo Picasso bronzes and sculpture, revealing their materials and casting process.

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16-Feb-2018 10:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 689745

U.S. Government Personnel Exposed to Noise in Cuba Show Signs of Brain Injury Normally Seen With Head Trauma

Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

At least 21 government employees who were exposed to unusual noises while serving at the United States Embassy in Havana, Cuba, show effects similar to traumatic brain injury, according to preliminary study results published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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16-Feb-2018 7:30 PM EST
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