Kris Byron Named Associate Editor of Academy of Management Review

Released: 12-May-2014 2:00 PM EDT
Source Newsroom: Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University
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Newswise — Kris Byron, associate professor and chair of the Department of Management at the Martin J. Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University, has accepted an invitation to serve as an associate editor with the prestigious Academy of Management Review (AMR). Byron’s three-year appointment with AMR, ranked among the top three most influential and frequently cited management and business journals, will begin July 1, 2014.

AMR is a theory development journal that publishes the highest quality conceptual work being done in the field. Articles challenge conventional wisdom concerning all aspects of organizations and their role in society and provide new theoretical insights.

Byron is a highly respected teacher and researcher. She has been published in the Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Psychological Bulletin, Journal of Management, and the Journal of Organizational Behavior, among others. National and local media, such as The New York Times, ABC News, Time.com and the Syracuse Post-Standard, often turn to her for her expertise. Her research primarily focuses on emotion in the workplace, employee creativity, women in leadership, and workplace stress. Byron, who received her PhD from Georgia State University, is a 2012-2014 Whitman fellow.

Her most recent paper, titled, “Diplomas, Photos, & Tchotchkes As Symbolic Self-Representations: Understanding Employees’ Individual Use Of Symbols,” and co-authored with Greg Laurence, a 2012 Ph.D. graduate of the Whitman School serving on the faculty at the University of Michigan-Flint, has been accepted for publication by the Academy of Management Journal. Through interviews, workspace inventories and observations, this study examines employees’ tendency to personalize their workspaces with photos, memorabilia and other objects—even when rules prohibit it—and what this practice reveals about an individual’s self-expression and work relationships.


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