Feature Channels: Cardiovascular Health

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Newswise: Loyola Medicine Offers Men's Health Tips for the New Year
Released: 14-Jan-2021 1:55 PM EST
Loyola Medicine Offers Men's Health Tips for the New Year
Loyola Medicine

A new year brings a new opportunity to focus on health, and Loyola Medicine Men's Health Center Director Kevin McVary, MD is offering tips for a healthier 2021.

12-Jan-2021 3:05 PM EST
Cardiac Rehabilitation is Underused Across the Country. One Simple Change Could Fix That.
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Making doctors opt out from prescribing cardiac rehabilitation instead of opting in increased referrals by roughly 70 percent

Newswise: Healthcare Innovation Eases Burden on ICU Staff
Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:35 PM EST
Healthcare Innovation Eases Burden on ICU Staff
Cedars-Sinai

Throughout the COVID-19 crisis, Cedars-Sinai employees have stepped-up and stepped-in to support patients and colleagues alike. And while there has been no shortage of selflessness, one group of volunteers shines a bright light on both the innovation and teamwork spurring from the past 10 months of treating the sickest of patients.

Newswise: Impact of COVID lockdown on aeromedical retrievals in remote parts of Australia
Released: 12-Jan-2021 6:05 PM EST
Impact of COVID lockdown on aeromedical retrievals in remote parts of Australia
University of South Australia

New data released this week by Australian researchers reveals the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown period on aeromedical retrievals in rural and remote regions.

Newswise: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Now Leads World in Heart Transplantation
Released: 12-Jan-2021 12:45 PM EST
Vanderbilt University Medical Center Now Leads World in Heart Transplantation
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Vanderbilt University Medical Center performed more heart transplants in 2020 than any other center in the world — 124 adult hearts, 23 pediatric hearts and VUMC’s first heart-lung transplant since 2006.

Newswise: Spikes in cardiovascular deaths shown to be an indirect cost of COVID-19 pandemic
Released: 12-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST
Spikes in cardiovascular deaths shown to be an indirect cost of COVID-19 pandemic
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), researchers analyzed data from the National Center for Health Statistics to compare the rate of cardiovascular-related deaths before and after the onset of the pandemic in the United States, relative to the same periods in the prior year.

Newswise: Wearable Electronics for Continuous Cardiac, Respiratory Monitoring
5-Jan-2021 11:45 AM EST
Wearable Electronics for Continuous Cardiac, Respiratory Monitoring
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A small and inexpensive sensor, announced in Applied Physics Letters and based on an electrochemical system, could potentially be worn continuously by cardiac patients or others who require constant monitoring. A solution containing electrolyte substances is placed into a small circular cavity that is capped with a thin flexible diaphragm, allowing detection of subtle movements when placed on a patient’s chest. The authors suggest their sensor could be used for diagnosis of respiratory diseases.

Newswise: Enhanced Oral Uptake of Exosomes Opens Cell Therapy Alternative
Released: 11-Jan-2021 4:20 PM EST
Enhanced Oral Uptake of Exosomes Opens Cell Therapy Alternative
Cedars-Sinai

Cell-derived exosomes are effective in treating disease when mixed with the dominant protein in breast milk and given orally, a new Smidt Heart Institute study of laboratory mice shows. The findings, published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Extracellular Vesicles, could help develop new oral medications for treating patients with muscular dystrophy and heart failure.

Newswise: Study Finds New Evidence of Health Threat From Chemicals in Marijuana and Tobacco Smoke
7-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
Study Finds New Evidence of Health Threat From Chemicals in Marijuana and Tobacco Smoke
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have uncovered new evidence of the potential health risks of chemicals in tobacco and marijuana smoke.

Newswise: Cardiac MRI Shows Lower Degrees of Myocarditis in Athletes Recovered From COVID-19
Released: 8-Jan-2021 10:20 AM EST
Cardiac MRI Shows Lower Degrees of Myocarditis in Athletes Recovered From COVID-19
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The Vanderbilt study, COVID-19 Myocardial Pathology Evaluation in AthleTEs with Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (COMPETE CMR), found a much lower degree of myocarditis in athletes than what was previously reported in other studies.

Newswise: David J. Cohen, MD, MSc, Joins CRF as Director of Clinical and Outcomes Research and St. Francis Hospital as Director of Academic Affairs
Released: 6-Jan-2021 1:00 PM EST
David J. Cohen, MD, MSc, Joins CRF as Director of Clinical and Outcomes Research and St. Francis Hospital as Director of Academic Affairs
Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF)

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) announced today that David J. Cohen, MD, MSc, has joined the organization as Director of Clinical and Outcomes Research.

Newswise: Common drug may protect hearts from damage caused by breast cancer chemotherapy
6-Jan-2021 5:00 AM EST
Common drug may protect hearts from damage caused by breast cancer chemotherapy
University Health Network (UHN)

New research from UHN’s Peter Munk Cardiac Centre (PMCC) shows statins, commonly prescribed to lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, may also protect the heart from damaging side-effects of early breast cancer treatment.

Newswise: Lung, Heart, Kidney and Liver Transplant Programs Rank among Nation’s Best
Released: 5-Jan-2021 4:05 PM EST
Lung, Heart, Kidney and Liver Transplant Programs Rank among Nation’s Best
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego Health’s lung, heart, kidney and liver transplant programs rank at the top nationally in the latest biannual Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) report. Innovative treatment and multi-disciplinary care contribute to the high rankings for one-year survival outcomes.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 5-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Newswise:Video Embedded back-to-basics-researchers-find-simple-exercises-are-a-practical-time-efficient-way-to-boost-fitness
VIDEO
Released: 4-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
Back to basics: Researchers find simple exercises are a practical, time-efficient way to boost fitness
McMaster University

Kinesiologists at McMaster University who examined the effectiveness of old-school physical training have found that simple bodyweight exercises, when performed vigorously over short periods, improve cardiorespiratory fitness.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 22-Dec-2020 11:00 AM EST
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Newswise: Controlling Cardiac Waves with Light to Better Understand Abnormally Rapid Heart Rhythms
21-Dec-2020 11:15 AM EST
Controlling Cardiac Waves with Light to Better Understand Abnormally Rapid Heart Rhythms
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Over 300,000 people die each year in the U.S. due to sudden cardiac death. In many cases, sudden cardiac death is caused by abnormally rapid heart rhythms called tachycardias, which means the heart cannot pump adequate blood to the body. In Chaos, researchers use mice to study tachycardias and find there are intrinsic mechanisms that exist in heart tissue that they hypothesize lead to the self-termination of rapid cardiac rhythm.

Released: 21-Dec-2020 1:50 PM EST
COVID-19: avoiding hospital caused heart disease death rise
University College London

Lower rates of hospital attendance for urgent heart problems during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic may have contributed to avoidable deaths in England, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.

Released: 21-Dec-2020 11:10 AM EST
Difference in blood pressure between arms linked to greater death risk
University of Exeter

Robust evidence from a large international study confirms that a difference in blood pressure readings between arms is linked to greater risk of heart attack, stroke and death.

Newswise: Morristown Medical Center’s Dr. Philippe Généreux Again Named One of World’s Most Highly Cited Researchers
Released: 18-Dec-2020 4:20 PM EST
Morristown Medical Center’s Dr. Philippe Généreux Again Named One of World’s Most Highly Cited Researchers
Atlantic Health System

For the second year, Philippe Géneréux, MD, Co-Director of the Structural Heart Program at Atlantic Health System’s Morristown Medical Center and an interventional cardiologist internationally known for his novel research, has been named a Highly Cited Researcher by the Clarivate™ Web of Science™ Group. Dr. Géneréux is the only New Jersey-based physician-scientist to be named to this year’s list in the Clinical Medicine category. Clinical Medicine requires more highly cited papers than any other field to meet the criteria for inclusion on the Highly Cited list.

Newswise: Aboriginal women share their stories on keeping the heart strong
Released: 17-Dec-2020 10:05 PM EST
Aboriginal women share their stories on keeping the heart strong
University of South Australia

More than a decade after committing $130+ billion to Closing the Gap, there has been little improvement in health outcomes experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

Newswise: CAN risk in diabetes reduced with intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure
Released: 16-Dec-2020 2:55 PM EST
CAN risk in diabetes reduced with intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure
Joslin Diabetes Center

BOSTON – (December 16, 2020) – Intensive interventions to reduce blood glucose and blood pressure levels in type 2 diabetes reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), a frequent but underdiagnosed complication of diabetes that can be life-threatening. In a study led by Alessandro Doria , MD, PhD, MPH, from the Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School, and Rodica Pop Busui, MD, PhD, of the University of Michigan, published online in Diabetes Care , researchers found that intensive glycemic control reduced CAN risk by 17%, while intensive blood pressure control reduced risks by 22%.

Newswise: 251769_web.jpg
Released: 16-Dec-2020 1:25 PM EST
Novel biomarkers predict the development of incident heart failure
University of Eastern Finland

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital have discovered several new biomarkers that are associated with incident heart failure.

Released: 16-Dec-2020 1:10 PM EST
Elite soccer players help define normal heart measures in competitive athletes
Massachusetts General Hospital

Clinicians are often asked to assess competitive athletes with cardiovascular symptoms and to screen asymptomatic athletes for hidden heart problems.

Released: 16-Dec-2020 11:25 AM EST
Study highlights stark inequality in survival after cardiac surgery between paying and NHS patients
University of Bristol

A new study has revealed paying patients are 20 per cent less likely to die or develop major complications, such as reintervention or stroke, after cardiac surgery than NHS patients – findings researchers say cannot be explained by socioeconomic factors alone.

15-Dec-2020 12:35 PM EST
COVID-19 patients at higher risk of death, health problems than those with flu
Washington University in St. Louis

Almost a year ago, COVID-19 began its global rampage, going on to infect about 69.5 million people and kill about 1.6 million as of early this month. From the beginning, most scientists have said that COVID-19 is deadlier than the seasonal flu, while fringe theories have circulated widely, suggesting it is less deadly or flu’s equal. Evidence is accumulating, however, to show just how much deadlier COVID-19 is compared with the flu and the extent of complications related to the two illnesses.

Newswise: Study Shows Women Less Likely to Survive Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Than Men
Released: 15-Dec-2020 8:00 AM EST
Study Shows Women Less Likely to Survive Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Than Men
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Dec. 15, 2020 – A study of patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest shows that women have a lower likelihood of survival compared with men and are less likely to receive procedures commonly administered following cardiac arrest.

Newswise: Dallas Heart Study Yields New Insights About Depression
Released: 14-Dec-2020 1:35 PM EST
Dallas Heart Study Yields New Insights About Depression
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Dec. 14, 2020 – Recently published UT Southwestern research reveals new insights about risk factors for depression based on data from a landmark longitudinal study focused on heart disease.

Released: 14-Dec-2020 12:25 PM EST
First 10 days after leaving hospital carry high risk for COVID-19 patients, study in veterans finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

In the first months after their COVID-19 hospital stay, patients face a high risk of ongoing health problems, trips back to the hospital, and death, a growing number of studies has shown. But the first week and a half may be especially dangerous. A new study shows COVID-19 patients had a 40% to 60% higher risk of ending up back in the hospital or dying in the first 10 days , compared with similar patients treated at the same hospitals during the same months for heart failure or pneumonia.

Newswise: Pitt Scientists Identify Genetic Risks of Rare Inflammatory Disease
7-Dec-2020 12:05 PM EST
Pitt Scientists Identify Genetic Risks of Rare Inflammatory Disease
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

A group of international collaborators led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh identified new genetic associations that can predict individual susceptibility to Takayasu arteritis.

Newswise: Media Advisory: Save the Date for Virtual STS Annual Meeting
8-Dec-2020 10:55 AM EST
Media Advisory: Save the Date for Virtual STS Annual Meeting
The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

Credentialed press representatives are invited to attend The Society of Thoracic Surgeons VIRTUAL 57th Annual Meeting. This interactive, fully digital experience—expected to be unlike anything that the specialty has experienced to date—will feature thought-provoking lectures, practice-changing science, and cutting-edge techniques and technologies.

9-Dec-2020 8:55 AM EST
Predicting Heart Disease from the Skin
Thomas Jefferson University

Jefferson researchers find that the genetic underpinnings of a skin disorder at birth indicate future heart problems.

Released: 9-Dec-2020 1:10 PM EST
Research shows disparities in how communities respond to cardiac arrest
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Black neighborhoods had a significantly lower rate of bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use relative to non-Hispanic/Latino white communities, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Released: 8-Dec-2020 11:25 AM EST
Large US study confirms COVID-19 complications: lung, kidney and cardiovascular issues
Canadian Medical Association (CMA)

A large study of patients in the United States who contracted coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) confirms many complications of the disease, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Newswise: Genetic variants linked to heart health in African American childhood cancer survivors
7-Dec-2020 8:25 AM EST
Genetic variants linked to heart health in African American childhood cancer survivors
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have identified genetic variants in African American childhood cancer survivors that have implications for up-front care and long-term surveillance.

Newswise: 250679_web.jpg
Released: 4-Dec-2020 1:05 PM EST
The Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of having another heart attack
University of Cordoba

Heart disease is the main cause of death in developed countries.

Released: 4-Dec-2020 11:15 AM EST
Free Access to TCT Connect Extended for One Year
Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF)

All educational programming from TCT Connect will be available to registrants for free through October 18, 2021. TCT is the annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) and the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine.

Released: 3-Dec-2020 1:25 PM EST
Mount Sinai Doctors Opens New Location in Yonkers, New York
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai Doctors has opened a new location in Yonkers, New York, with services that include primary care, cardiology, neurology, and gastroenterology. The new, state-of-the-art facility is 6,000 square feet and located on the ground floor of the historic Boyce Thompson Center at 1086 North Broadway.

Newswise: Recognized Leader On Diversity And Inclusion Appointed Associate Dean At UTSW
Released: 3-Dec-2020 10:00 AM EST
Recognized Leader On Diversity And Inclusion Appointed Associate Dean At UTSW
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Dec. 3, 2020 – Quinn Capers IV, M.D., a nationally recognized leader on diversity and inclusion in academic medicine, has joined UT Southwestern as associate dean for faculty diversity and the inaugural vice chair for diversity and inclusion in the department of internal medicine at UT Southwestern.

Released: 3-Dec-2020 8:25 AM EST
Amino Acid Connected to NAFLD Could Provide Treatment Clues
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Basic science research explores the effects of impaired glycine metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease – and how to potentially use glycine-based treatment to help people with NAFLD.

Newswise: New activity found for CHD7, a protein factor vital in embryonic development
Released: 2-Dec-2020 4:10 PM EST
New activity found for CHD7, a protein factor vital in embryonic development
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers inactivated the gene for CHD7 — whose mutation causes congenital birth defects — in mouse embryos, and then rigorously probed how this change in developing cardiac neural crest cells caused severe defects in the outflow tract and great arteries, leading to perinatal lethality.

Newswise: Patient with aortic aneurysm benefits from innovative, minimally invasive procedure
Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:40 PM EST
Patient with aortic aneurysm benefits from innovative, minimally invasive procedure
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

When Rodolfo Sandoval was told he would need to undergo open surgery to repair his thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm, he hesitated. At 73 years old, he was worried about the recovery process for a major, invasive procedure. Then COVID-19 arrived and he made the decision that he would only consider the surgery if it became a life or death situation.

Released: 1-Dec-2020 1:30 PM EST
Statins can save lives, are they being used?
Mayo Clinic

People who have coronary artery disease, stroke or peripheral artery disease often are prescribed a statin, a cholesterol-lowering drug that reduces the risk of heart attack or stroke.In a recent publication in JAMA Network Open, Mayo Clinic researchers identify trends in statin use across the U.S. among people with these diseases, as well as among those who already had a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Their data indicate that only about 60% of patients are getting the recommended therapy.


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