Feature Channels: Cardiovascular Health

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Embargo will expire: 15-Jul-2020 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT

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Released: 9-Jul-2020 2:15 PM EDT
NFHS-AMSSM Guidance for Assessing Cardiac Issues in High School Student-Athletes with COVID-19 Infection
American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM)

An expert medical task force appointed by the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) and National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) has issued guidance for assessing potential cardiac issues in high school student-athletes with COVID-19 infection.

8-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Cleveland Clinic Researchers Find Rise In Broken Heart Syndrome During COVID-19 Pandemic
Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland Clinic researchers have found a significant increase in patients experiencing stress cardiomyopathy, also known as broken heart syndrome, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 13-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Jul-2020 10:50 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 13-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 13-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 13-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 9:20 AM EDT
Contracting COVID-19, Lifestyle and Social Connections May Play a Role
Association for Psychological Science

Current research indicates that unhealthy lifestyle choices along with emotional stressors like social are important risk factors for developing upper respiratory infections. It is possible these same factors also increase the risk of contracting COVID-19.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 3:40 PM EDT
In Firefighter Trainees, ‘Mediterranean Lifestyle’ Linked to Lower Health Risks
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Young firefighter recruits who follow a ‘Mediterranean lifestyle’ are less likely to have hypertension (high blood pressure) and more likely to have good aerobic fitness, reports a study in the July Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Newswise: University of Miami Launches COVID-19 Heart Program
Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:50 PM EDT
University of Miami Launches COVID-19 Heart Program
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

A new COVID-19 Heart Program developed by cardiologists with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine is addressing the varied heart issues stemming from the pandemic with comprehensive screenings and evaluations in a safe clinical setting. It also incorporates the latest findings from UM cardiology researchers studying how the coronavirus can affect the heart and its surrounding tissues.

30-Jun-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Cutting Down But Not Out: Very-Heavy Drinkers Needn’t Quit Completely for Cardiovascular Benefit
Research Society on Alcoholism

High-risk drinkers who substantially reduce their alcohol use can lower their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) despite not completely abstaining, according to study findings published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. CVD encompasses a range of conditions involving the heart or blood vessels, and is the leading cause of death in the US. It is also one of many negative health outcomes associated with heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Reductions in drinking can be defined using World Health Organization (WHO) ‘risk drinking levels’, which classify drinkers into ‘very high’, ‘high’, ‘moderate’ and ‘low’ risk categories based on their average daily alcohol consumption. Previous research has shown that a reduction of two or more levels (for example, from ‘very high’ to ‘moderate’) can lower the risk of multiple health issues, but did not assess the impact on CVD specifically. The latest study has examined associations between reductions in WHO risk drinking

Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Hot flushes and night sweats linked to 70% increase in cardiovascular disease
University of Queensland

New research from The University of Queensland has found that women who have hot flushes and night sweats after menopause are 70 per cent more likely to have heart attacks, angina and strokes.

Newswise: Free Webinar: Economic Impact of COVID and Implications for the Future of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Free Webinar: Economic Impact of COVID and Implications for the Future of Cardiothoracic Surgery
The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

The COVID pandemic has not only had a devastating humanitarian impact, but it also has shocked health care system finances. In this webinar, STS President Joseph A. Dearani, MD, will talk with cardiothoracic surgeons, a hospital executive, and a health care consultant about various important topics.

Newswise: COVID-19: Study Shows Virus Can Infect Heart Cells in Lab Dish
Released: 30-Jun-2020 2:35 PM EDT
COVID-19: Study Shows Virus Can Infect Heart Cells in Lab Dish
Cedars-Sinai

A new study shows that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 (coronavirus), can infect heart cells in a lab dish, indicating it may be possible for heart cells in COVID-19 patients to be directly infected by the virus. The discovery, published today in the journal Cell Reports Medicine, was made using heart muscle cells that were produced by stem cell technology.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 11:50 AM EDT
For Cardiac Rehab Patients, In-Home Portable Air Cleaners Lower Fine-Particle Pollutant Exposure
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Using an in-home portable air cleaner (PAC) can significantly reduce exposure to fine-particle air pollutants – a major risk factor for cardiovascular events in people with pre-existing heart disease, reports a pilot study in the July issue of Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Need to Check Patient’s Jugular Venous Pressure? There’s An App For That
Released: 30-Jun-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Need to Check Patient’s Jugular Venous Pressure? There’s An App For That
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – July 1, 2020 – A new report from cardiologists at UT Southwestern raises the hope that doctors will be able to visually check the jugular venous pressure of heart failure patients remotely, using the camera on a smartphone. The finding is especially timely as telemedicine expands during the pandemic.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 8:05 AM EDT
MIPT geneticist Pavel Volchkov shares his thoughts on using genetic mechanisms to oppose diseases, and talks about his vision of science communication
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT)

Progress can be safely considered synonymous with science. We have seen a tangible improvement over the last hundred years. But who are the people behind such a mysterious sphere as science? What is its future focus? And why are academic partnerships so important now? Explains MIPT geneticist Pavel Volchkov

Released: 29-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
New York State Department of Health Announces Study on Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children
University at Albany, State University of New York

The New York State Department of Health today announced that the Department has led a study on multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19, which was published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The Department collaborated with the University at Albany School of Public Health and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to complete the study.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Infant heart-assist device gets new life with $4.7M grant
Cornell University

After being defunded by a company with rights to its intellectual property, development of a pediatric heart-assist device has been revived at Cornell with the help of a $4.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense.

Released: 26-Jun-2020 8:45 AM EDT
At the Heart of the Matter: ACSM Updates Recommendations to Prevent Cardiovascular Events at Fitness Facilities
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

American College of Sports Medicine's new expert consensus statement updates guidance on training staff and establishing emergency plans to prevent cardiovascular events at fitness facilities, community and hotel fitness facilities and sporting event venues.

Released: 24-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
MacNeal Hospital Launches First Clinical Trial in Illinois of Novel Monitoring Device for Congestive Heart Failure Patients
Loyola Medicine

MacNeal Hospital is the first hospital in Illinois to participate in a national, randomized clinical trial using daily vital signs and lung pressure measurement to manage patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). The PROACTIVE-HF trial utilizes a new monitoring system, coupled with a pressure sensor, implanted directly into a blood vessel in the lung. This system provides information that is recorded and transmitted over a cellular or Wi-Fi connection to a patient’s provider, allowing for medication changes, if necessary, to prevent further health deterioration or hospitalization.

Released: 24-Jun-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Wildfire smoke has immediate harmful health effects: UBC study
University of British Columbia

Exposure to wildfire smoke affects the body's respiratory and cardiovascular systems almost immediately, according to new research from the University of British Columbia's School of Population and Public Health.

19-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Transgenic rice lowers blood pressure of hypertensive rats
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have made transgenic rice that contains several anti-hypertensive peptides. When given to hypertensive rats, the rice lowered their blood pressure.

Released: 23-Jun-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Death risk highest for people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes who get heart failure
American Heart Association (AHA)

Heart failure posed the greatest 5-year risk of death for people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes than any other heart or kidney diseases, according to new research published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

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Released: 23-Jun-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Tongue microbes provide window to heart health
European Society of Cardiology

Microorganisms on the tongue could help diagnose heart failure, according to research presented today on HFA Discoveries, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1

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Released: 23-Jun-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Reducing the damage of a heart attack
San Diego State University

In a heart attack, a series of biochemical processes leave the heart damaged, much like a car after an accident.

Released: 22-Jun-2020 5:50 PM EDT
ACTG Studies at AIDS 2020: Virtual
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Topics include the efficacy and safety of third-line treatment regimens in resource-limited settings, viral rebound rates after treatment interruption of modern ART, and whether a standardized frailty score can improve clinicians’ ability to estimate cardiovascular risk among older people with HIV.

18-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Critically Ill Patients with COVID-19 Are More Likely to Develop Heart Rhythm Disorders Than Other Hospitalized Patients
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to an intensive care unit were 10 times more likely than other hospitalized COVID-19 patients to suffer cardiac arrest or heart rhythm disorders, according to a new study. .

Newswise: Better Measure of ‘Good Cholesterol’ Can Gauge Heart Attack And Stroke Risk in Some Populations
Released: 22-Jun-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Better Measure of ‘Good Cholesterol’ Can Gauge Heart Attack And Stroke Risk in Some Populations
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 22, 2020 – For decades, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol has been dubbed “good cholesterol” because of its role in moving fats and other cholesterol molecules out of artery walls. People with higher HDL cholesterol levels tend to have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, studies have shown.

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Released: 19-Jun-2020 12:35 PM EDT
First known case of a potentially deadly heart rhythm disturbance induced by chloroquine therapy for COVID-19 reported
Elsevier

A patient who met many of the published safety guidelines for chloroquine therapy against COVID-19 was observed to have a very abnormal ECG pattern after treatment began, leading to multiple episodes of torsade de pointes (TdP), a life-threatening arrhythmia in which the lower chambers of the heart beat out of sync with the upper chambers.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 18-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Newswise: COVID-19 and the Future of Cardiac Care
Released: 18-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
COVID-19 and the Future of Cardiac Care
Cedars-Sinai

As Cedars-Sinai expands telehealth and video visits and resumes surgeries, Joanna Chikwe, MD, chair of the Department of Cardiac Surgery at the Smidt Heart Institute, has her focus on one thing: ensuring that patients with heart disease understand it is safe to be seen, and treated, by Cedars-Sinai healthcare teams.

17-Jun-2020 10:15 AM EDT
10 Percent of Patients Continue to Use Opioids Three to Six Months After Heart Surgery
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Nearly 10 percent of patients who are prescribed opioid medications following heart surgery will continue to use opioids more than 90 days after the procedure, according to a new study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Released: 16-Jun-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Cholesterol levels dropping in Western nations but rising in Asia
University of Gothenburg

Cholesterol levels are declining sharply in western nations, but rising in low- and middle-income nations - particularly in Asia, according to a study of global cholesterol levels, which involve researchers at the University of Gothenburg.

Newswise: Children's Hospital Los Angeles Ranked No. 1 Children's Hospital in the Western U.S., No. 5 Nationally for Second Straight Year
16-Jun-2020 12:05 AM EDT
Children's Hospital Los Angeles Ranked No. 1 Children's Hospital in the Western U.S., No. 5 Nationally for Second Straight Year
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) ranks again among the nation’s premier destinations for pediatric care, according to the U.S. News & World Report Best Children's Hospitals annual list released today. Hospital retains national No. 5 ranking and is highest scoring children's hospital in Western United States.

Newswise: Blocking Brain Signals Detected in the Kidney Could Help Unlock Future Treatments for Kidney Failure, Heart Disease, and Stroke
11-Jun-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Blocking Brain Signals Detected in the Kidney Could Help Unlock Future Treatments for Kidney Failure, Heart Disease, and Stroke
University of Bristol

Scientists have discovered an important cell signalling pathway in the kidney which if stopped, could hold the key to treating chronic kidney disease as well as other deadly conditions, including heart attack and stroke.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Heartbeat Health and The American College of Cardiology Join to Revolutionize Cardiology With Breakthrough Virtual Care
Heartbeat Health

Using wearables and devices, physicians can incorporate clinical data into telehealth visits to offer complete remote health management.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Mount Sinai Health System Appoints Beth Oliver, DNP, RN, as Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Executive
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai Health System has appointed Beth Oliver, DNP, RN, to the role of Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Executive.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Who is at risk of heart rhythm disorders?
European Society of Cardiology

Use the right tool for the job. Today experts outline the best way to identify people most likely to develop common and devastating heart rhythm disorders.

Newswise: Multi-ethnic study suggests vitamin K may offer protective health benefits in older age
Released: 15-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Multi-ethnic study suggests vitamin K may offer protective health benefits in older age
Tufts University

A new, multi-ethnic study from researchers at Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center found adults aged 54-76 with low circulating vitamin K levels were more likely to die within 13 years compared to those with adequate levels, suggesting vitamin K may offer protective health benefits as we age.

Released: 11-Jun-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Time-Saving High-Intensity Workouts Can Benefit People with Spinal Cord Injuries, Researchers Find
McMaster University

Research from the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University has found that the practical advantages of high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or short bursts of all-out exercise, could be especially beneficial for people who have experienced spinal cord injuries (SCI).

5-Jun-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Treatment Gap Between Men and Women for Stroke May Have Narrowed
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

While studies in the early 2000s showed that women were 30% less likely to receive clot-busting treatment for a stroke than men, a new analysis of recent studies found that the gap has narrowed to 13%, according to a meta-analysis published in the June 10, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Link between liver and heart disease could lead to new therapeutics
5-Jun-2020 10:45 AM EDT
Link between liver and heart disease could lead to new therapeutics
Iowa State University

A newly published study of flies found that protecting liver function also preserves heart health. The research could lead to new therapeutic approaches in human health and illuminate the role of understudied organelles known as peroxisomes.

Released: 9-Jun-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Missing Sodium-channel Component May Protect against Diet-induced Artery Stiffening
American Physiological Society (APS)

New research in mice finds that deficiency in one small component of a signaling pathway may protect against artery stiffening and subsequent kidney disease associated with a high-fat, high-sugar diet.

Newswise: National Calorie Menu Labeling Law Could Add Years of Healthy Living, Save Billions
Released: 9-Jun-2020 9:30 AM EDT
National Calorie Menu Labeling Law Could Add Years of Healthy Living, Save Billions
Tufts University

The national law requiring calorie labeling on menus at large chain restaurants is estimated to prevent tens of thousands of new heart disease and type 2 diabetes cases—and save thousands of lives—in just five years, according to a new study that estimates the law’s impact.

Released: 8-Jun-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Racial, Gender Disparities Observed in Heart Transplant Recipients with COVID-19 Infection
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers suggest focusing on disparities to help identify which patients with a heart transplant may be at higher risk for a worse course of COVID-19 infection.

Released: 8-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Late-Breaking Science Announced for TVT Connect
Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF)

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) announced that TVT Connect will feature eight studies as Late-Breaking Clinical Science. They will be presented during episodes moderated by the editors of Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions and JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. Each late-breaking science episode will host a live wrap-up and Q&A session afterwards.

Newswise: Heart Injury Among Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients Associated with Higher Risk of Death
Released: 8-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Heart Injury Among Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients Associated with Higher Risk of Death
Mount Sinai Health System

Study findings may help doctors better triage coronavirus patients admitted to the hospital

Released: 7-Jun-2020 11:10 PM EDT
Analysis of Seattle EMS and hospital data indicates low COVID infection risk from bystander CPR
American Heart Association (AHA)

Analysis of Seattle emergency medical services (EMS) and hospital data from January 1 to April 15, 2020, indicates bystander CPR is a lifesaving endeavor whose benefits outweigh the risks of COVID-19 infection, according to a new article published yesterday in the American Heart Association's flagship journal Circulation.

Released: 7-Jun-2020 10:20 PM EDT
Fitful nightly sleep linked to chronic inflammation, hardened arteries
University of California, Berkeley

Disrupted nightly sleep and clogged arteries tend to sneak up on us as we age. And while both disorders may seem unrelated, a new study from the University of California, Berkeley, helps explain why they are, in fact, pathologically intertwined.


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