Feature Channels: Plants

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Newswise: How do rootstocks help tomato growers under heat and drought?
Released: 23-May-2022 8:00 AM EDT
How do rootstocks help tomato growers under heat and drought?
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Certain rootstocks may improve plant performance by enhancing the amount of root biomass used to support shoot function

Released: 20-May-2022 3:30 PM EDT
Satellites and drones can help save pollinators
University of Exeter

Satellites and drones can provide key information to protect pollinators, researchers say.

Released: 19-May-2022 4:30 PM EDT
How fast-growing algae could enhance growth of food crops
Princeton University

A new study provides a framework to boost crop growth by incorporating a strategy adopted from a fast-growing species of green algae.

Newswise: Satellite monitoring of biodiversity moves within reach
Released: 19-May-2022 11:45 AM EDT
Satellite monitoring of biodiversity moves within reach
University of Zurich

Internationally comparable data on biodiversity is needed to protect threatened ecosystems, restore destroyed habitats and counteract the negative effects of global biodiversity loss.

Newswise: New strategies to save the world’s most indispensable grain
Released: 19-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
New strategies to save the world’s most indispensable grain
University of California, Riverside

Plants — they’re just like us, with unique techniques for handling stress.

Released: 17-May-2022 12:55 PM EDT
Vine Removal Technique Foils Devastating Grape Disease
Cornell University

Removing not only a diseased grapevine but the two vines on either side of it can reduce the incidence of leafroll disease, a long-standing bane of vineyards around the world, Cornell University researchers have found.

Newswise: 2022-05-12-9426-0005-hr.jpg
16-May-2022 2:15 PM EDT
Scientists Nail Down 'Destination' for Protein That Delivers Zinc
Brookhaven National Laboratory

New research describes a “chaperone” protein that delivers zinc, a trace element essential for survival in all living things, to where it’s needed. The chaperone could be especially important when access to zinc is limited—for example in nutrient deficient diets and for growing crops on depleted soils.

Newswise:Video Embedded research-with-a-peel-fsu-study-on-banana-browning-could-help-tackle-food-waste
VIDEO
Released: 11-May-2022 1:30 PM EDT
Research with a peel: FSU study on banana browning could help tackle food waste
Florida State University

A team of FSU researchers investigated the formation and spread of brown spots on bananas, a striking case of biological pattern formation. In research published in Physical Biology, the team described how the spots appear during a two-day window, rapidly expand, but then mysteriously stall, leaving a sharp distinction between spots of brown and the still-yellow peel.

Newswise: Decreasing the Knowledge Gap for Finger Millet
Released: 11-May-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Decreasing the Knowledge Gap for Finger Millet
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Genetic mapping of the yield traits provides useful data for breeders about this east Africa grain crop

Released: 9-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Clemson web apps calculate soil pH to help growers increase profits, reduce costs
Clemson University

Lime is a very important soil amendment used to grow crops. To help ensure the correct amount is applied where it is needed most, the Clemson University Precision Agriculture Team has developed the Reverse Lime Rate Calculator.

Newswise: Harnessing the Power of Perennial Plants for Sustainable Agriculture
Released: 9-May-2022 10:25 AM EDT
Harnessing the Power of Perennial Plants for Sustainable Agriculture
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Matthew Rubin’s research is focused on perennial plants, or “long-lived” plants, seeking to increase our understanding of these plants across their lifetime. Perennial plants offer many benefits to agriculture and our environment. They develop deep root systems that fix carbon, reduce water needs, and help restore soil health. When used for agriculture, perennials can provide multiple harvests from the same plant, offering a more sustainable solution for future agricultural systems.

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Released: 9-May-2022 9:55 AM EDT
IN2 AgTech Startups Making an Impact
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

While our planet faces many grand challenges that are impacting global food security, the Wells Fargo Innovation Incubator (IN2) is helping to bring new AgTech innovations to the table.

Newswise: Finding the Best Lentil Varieties for Every Farm
Released: 4-May-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Finding the Best Lentil Varieties for Every Farm
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

A recent study measured how environmental factors and plant genetics come together to influence lentil yields and nutritional content

Newswise: ‘Extreme’ plants grow faster in the face of stress
Released: 2-May-2022 4:35 PM EDT
‘Extreme’ plants grow faster in the face of stress
Stanford University

When faced with conditions that are too dry, salty, or cold, most plants try to conserve resources. They send out fewer leaves and roots and close up their pores to hold in water. If circumstances don’t improve, they eventually die.

Released: 2-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Scientists create viable, reproducing yeast-cyanobacterial hybrids
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Every plant, animal or other nucleus-containing cell also harbors an array of miniature “organs” that perform essential functions for the cell.

Newswise: Lighting the tunnel of plant evolution: Scientists explore importance of two-pore channels in plants
Released: 2-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Lighting the tunnel of plant evolution: Scientists explore importance of two-pore channels in plants
Tokyo University of Science

Two-pore channels (TPCs) are ancient ion channels present in the cells of both animals and plants.

Newswise: Hydroponic native plants to detox PFAS-contaminated water
Released: 1-May-2022 9:05 PM EDT
Hydroponic native plants to detox PFAS-contaminated water
University of South Australia

New research from the University of South Australia is helping to remediate the ‘indestructible’ PFASs as scientists show that Australian native plants can significantly remediate PFAS pollutants through floating wetlands to create healthier environments for all.

Newswise:Video Embedded how-a-soil-microbe-could-rev-up-artificial-photosynthesis
VIDEO
Released: 29-Apr-2022 2:00 PM EDT
How a Soil Microbe Could Rev Up Artificial Photosynthesis
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

When it comes to fixing carbon, plants have nothing on soil bacteria that can do it 20 times faster. The secret is an enzyme that “juggles” reaction ingredients. Scientists hope to optimize this process for producing fuels, antibiotics and other products from CO2.

Newswise: Researchers Shed Light on Why a Certain Plant Virus Is So Powerful at Fighting Cancer
Released: 27-Apr-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Researchers Shed Light on Why a Certain Plant Virus Is So Powerful at Fighting Cancer
University of California San Diego

The cowpea mosaic virus has shown great promise as an experimental cancer immunotherapy for treating and preventing recurrence of various cancers. But just how the virus triggers such a potent anti-cancer immune response has remained a mystery. A new study digs deeper and provides answers.

Newswise: Pushy plants? Student discovery 'adds new dimension to plant biology'
Released: 22-Apr-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Pushy plants? Student discovery 'adds new dimension to plant biology'
University of Florida

The tall elephant’s foot — low growing from a center arrangement of leaves, known as a rosette — have greater leverage to push, according to the study. Findings may also apply to other low-hovering plants, such as aloe or agave.

Newswise: The cycle of light: Analyzing how cellular proteins in leaves change through day, night
Released: 21-Apr-2022 9:30 AM EDT
The cycle of light: Analyzing how cellular proteins in leaves change through day, night
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Because next-generation biofuels will depend on the growth and hardiness of woody feedstocks, scientists have sought to better understand how leaf cells quickly respond to environmental cues such as light, temperature and water. Scientists at the Center for Bioenergy Innovation, or CBI, have studied rapid molecular changes in leaves from poplar trees during normal daily cycles of daylight and darkness. Until now, the effect of these modifications at the cellular protein level was not well understood, partly because of the technical limitations of the analytical tools available.

Newswise: Press release by the Association for Vertical Farming, Munich Germany April 18th, 2022
Released: 21-Apr-2022 7:00 AM EDT
Press release by the Association for Vertical Farming, Munich Germany April 18th, 2022
Green Bronx Machine

The Association for Vertical Farming (AVF) is pleased to announce our partnership with our new advisory board member, Stephen Ritz, and his non-profit, Green Bronx Machine.

Newswise: Peatland Plants Hide Responses to Environmental Change
Released: 19-Apr-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Peatland Plants Hide Responses to Environmental Change
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Peatlands store a significant amount of carbon, and researchers expect that peatland plants respond to warming climates will influence future carbon uptake and storage. To better understand this mechanism, especially below ground level, researchers conducted experiments on ecosystem warming. They found that warming and the resulting soil drying significantly increased the growth of fine roots, which may indicate peatlands’ ability to adapt to changing conditions.

Newswise: Scientists Resurrect Ancient Enzymes to Improve Photosynthesis
Released: 18-Apr-2022 4:45 PM EDT
Scientists Resurrect Ancient Enzymes to Improve Photosynthesis
Cornell University

A Cornell University study describes a breakthrough in the quest to improve photosynthesis in certain crops, a step toward adapting plants to rapid climate changes and increasing yields to feed a projected 9 billion people by 2050.

Newswise: With dwindling water supplies, the timing of rainfall matters
Released: 18-Apr-2022 1:55 PM EDT
With dwindling water supplies, the timing of rainfall matters
University of California, Riverside

A new UC Riverside study shows it’s not how much extra water you give your plants, but when you give it that counts.

Newswise: UF/IFAS scientists record first case of harmful bacteria in ubiquitous weed found throughout U.S.
Released: 18-Apr-2022 9:30 AM EDT
UF/IFAS scientists record first case of harmful bacteria in ubiquitous weed found throughout U.S.
University of Florida

Scientists at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) have recorded the first North American case of a harmful phytoplasma disease known for its threat to fruit, vegetable and ornamental crops in South America and the Middle East. These same crops are economically important to Florida and in parts of the U.S. To make matters worse, scientists confirmed the host for the disease to be one of the most noxious and rapidly spreading weeds commonly found in a wide range of environments throughout the United States and into Canada.

Newswise: Researchers detect a tropical plant species presumed to be extinct
Released: 18-Apr-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Researchers detect a tropical plant species presumed to be extinct
University of Miami

University of Miami associate professor Kenneth Feeley and graduate student Riley Fortier were part of a research group that rediscovered a plant called Gasteranthus extinctus, named to anticipate its extinction.

Newswise: Lost South American wildflower named “extinctus” rediscovered (but still endangered)
Released: 15-Apr-2022 10:30 AM EDT
Lost South American wildflower named “extinctus” rediscovered (but still endangered)
Field Museum

Scientific names get chosen for lots of reasons-- they can honor an important person, or hint at what an organism looks like or where it’s from. For a tropical wildflower first described by scientists in 2000, the scientific name “extinctus” was a warning.

13-Apr-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Infectious bacteria force host plants to feed them, study finds
Ohio State University

A species of bacteria that infect corn crops compel their hosts to produce a feast of nutrients that keeps the pathogens alive and thriving long before they start to kill the plant’s cells, new research shows.

Released: 12-Apr-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Cutting Down on One ‘Super Fat’ Could Help Plants Survive Climate Change
Michigan State University

Climate change doesn’t just mean warmer weather. Cold spells can hit unusual lows, too, and the fluctuations between warm and chilly are becoming more extreme.

Newswise: Research Pioneers New Frontiers in Plant-Based Food Science
6-Apr-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Research Pioneers New Frontiers in Plant-Based Food Science
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Modern methods of creating plant-based meat can yield high optical similarities and targeted molecular-sensory methods, but on a molecular scale, it appears completely different from the food it tries to mimic. In Physics of Fluids, scientists investigate the molecular function and effects of vegetable proteins of different origins to identify sensory weak points in plant-based substitutes, employing rheology and tribology and bringing greater insight than pure sensory analyses. They said muscle proteins emulsify fats and oils in a very different way while lending to a different biting behavior.

Newswise: Retro technique advances modern bacterial engineering for bioenergy
Released: 12-Apr-2022 8:30 AM EDT
Retro technique advances modern bacterial engineering for bioenergy
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists used protoplast fusion to create genetically diverse Bacillus organisms to aid in genome mapping, which advances the engineering of microbes for efficient biofuel processing.

Released: 11-Apr-2022 3:50 PM EDT
Researchers: We’ve found a “Healthy Weapon” Against Covid-19- dietary supplements found in pumpkins and peas
Tel Aviv University

Safe dietary supplements developed at Tel Aviv University might help protect the body against Covid-19 and a range of winter illnesses.

Newswise: Get Out of the Weeds – Use the Right Tool for the Job
Released: 7-Apr-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Get Out of the Weeds – Use the Right Tool for the Job
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

There is no “Swiss Army Knife” of herbicides, you must match the tool (the chemistry) to the task (the weed) – “the right tool for the job”

Newswise: Biologist has a plan to help the pivotal pollinators in the Pacific Northwest
Released: 5-Apr-2022 1:25 PM EDT
Biologist has a plan to help the pivotal pollinators in the Pacific Northwest
University of Oregon

An assistant biology professor at the University of Oregon has high hopes that a pilot study could change how forestlands in the Northwest are managed, particularly post-harvest and post-fire, to the benefit of the humble, and troubled, wild bee.

Newswise: Using Gene Scissors to Specifically Eliminate Individual Cell Types
Released: 4-Apr-2022 2:05 AM EDT
Using Gene Scissors to Specifically Eliminate Individual Cell Types
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

With the help of the CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors, genetic information in a plant can be modified to make the latter more robust to pests, diseases, or extreme climatic conditions. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed this method further to eliminate the complete DNA of specific cell types and, thus, prevent their formation during plant development. This will also help to better understand development mechanisms in plants. The findings are presented in Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-29130-w)

25-Mar-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Cardamonin Shows Promise for Treating Aggressive Breast Cancer
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Cardamonin — a natural compound found in the spice cardamom and other plants — could have therapeutic potential for triple-negative breast cancer, according to a new study using human cancer cells. The findings also show that the compound targets a gene that helps cancer cells elude the immune system.

25-Mar-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Plant Compound Shows Promise for Alleviating Food Allergies
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Researchers combined advanced computational methods with experimental studies to gain new insight, at the cell level, into how the plant compound formononetin might be used to treat food allergies. With nearly 10% of the world population affected by food allergies — which are sometimes life-threatening — new treatments are critically needed.

30-Mar-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Estimates of the carbon cycle - vital to predicting climate change - are incorrect, Virginia Tech researchers show
Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech researchers, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have discovered that key parts of the global carbon cycle used to track movement of carbon dioxide in the environment are not correct, which could significantly alter conventional carbon cycle models. This finding has the potential to change predictions for climate change, though it is unclear at this juncture if the mismatch will result in more or less carbon dioxide being accounted for in the environment.

Newswise: Molecular ‘blueprint’ illuminates how plants perceive light
Released: 31-Mar-2022 10:40 AM EDT
Molecular ‘blueprint’ illuminates how plants perceive light
Van Andel Institute

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (March 30, 2022) — Plants rely on their ability to sense light for survival. But unlike animals, plants don’t have eyes full of photoreceptors to capture and convey messages from visual stimuli. Instead, plants are coated with a network of light-sensing photoreceptors that detect different wavelengths of light, allowing them to regulate their lifecycles and adjust to environmental conditions.

Newswise: New ‘crime scene investigation’ may save endangered carnivorous plants
Released: 30-Mar-2022 12:35 PM EDT
New ‘crime scene investigation’ may save endangered carnivorous plants
Curtin University

Researchers have combined macro photography with DNA metabarcoding to create a new botanical “CSI” tool that may hold the key to safeguarding the future of Australia’s critically endangered carnivorous plants.

Released: 29-Mar-2022 4:10 PM EDT
Developing design criteria for active green wall bioremediation performance
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

In research led by Elizabeth Hénaff, with collaborators from Yale University In this new study explore how active plant-based systems may address air pollutions. The researchers investigated relationships between plant species choice, growth media design (hydroponic versus organic), and factors of design-related performance such as weight, water content, and air flow rate through growth media.

Newswise: Spero Renewables ‘TAPs’ Idaho National Laboratory
Released: 29-Mar-2022 12:00 PM EDT
Spero Renewables ‘TAPs’ Idaho National Laboratory
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

Recently, researchers at Spero Renewables, a California-based green technology company, tapped into Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Technical Assistance Program to work with researchers at the Biomass Feedstocks National User Facility. The program provides U.S.-based small businesses with access to INL experts and unique capabilities at no cost. Spero is using environmentally friendly practices to manufacture renewable chemicals from plant-based materials.

Newswise: Bioenergy scientists discover genetic pathway for better biofuel processing
Released: 28-Mar-2022 12:15 PM EDT
Bioenergy scientists discover genetic pathway for better biofuel processing
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

A team of researchers working with the Center for Bioenergy Innovation (CBI) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has discovered a pathway to encourage a type of lignin formation in plants that could make the processing of crops grown for products such as sustainable jet fuels easier and less costly.


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