Feature Channels: Plants

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Newswise: 268218_web.jpg
Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Alpine plant spins its own flavonoid wool
University of Cambridge

Like the movie version of Spider-Man who shoots spider webs from holes in his wrists, a little alpine plant has been found to eject cobweb-like threads from tiny holes in specialised cells on its leaves.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Texas A&M AgriLife Plant Breeding Programs Granted $1.75 million
Texas A&M AgriLife

Four Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Department of Soil and Crop Sciences plant breeding program development projects have been funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, NIFA. These programs are aimed at enhancing sorghum, corn, peanut and wheat cultivars for farmer use.

Released: 14-Jun-2021 3:00 PM EDT
New Hops Breeding Program Will Grow, Develop Signature NY Varieties
Cornell University

A $300,000 investment from New York state has paved the way for a new hops breeding program at Cornell AgriTech, which will grow and develop signature New York hops varieties – selected for high yield, preferred flavors and disease resistance – in support of the state’s $3.4 billion craft brewing industry.

Released: 14-Jun-2021 4:05 AM EDT
Trees, Plants and Soil Could Help Cities Cut Their Carbon Footprints — When Used Smartly
Aalto University

Carbon footprint declarations are used in construction to ease product selection for low carbon building, but these standards don’t yet exist for green elements like soil, bushes and plants. A new study led by Aalto University is the first to map out how green infrastructure can be a resource for cities on the path to carbon neutrality.

Newswise: 267563_web.jpg
Released: 11-Jun-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Decoded genome of little-known disease offers hope for citrus
University of California, Riverside

Scientists are hoping the RNA of an obscure infection can one day be used like a Trojan horse to deliver life-saving treatments to citrus trees.

Newswise: The Inner Workings of the Root Microbiome
Released: 11-Jun-2021 12:10 PM EDT
The Inner Workings of the Root Microbiome
Department of Energy, Office of Science

: The soil surrounding and including the roots of plants is a hotspot for bacteria that help plants resist infections, survive drought, and take up nutrients. However, scientists did not fully understand how bacteria assist plants. A new study provides new insights into the spots on roots where bacteria attach. This could help scientists understand and control how plants and bacteria interact.

Newswise: Labeling the Thale Cress Metabolites
Released: 9-Jun-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Labeling the Thale Cress Metabolites
Department of Energy, Office of Science

: Plants synthesize thousands of metabolites that help them adapt to their environments. Mass spectrometry can detect and measure metabolites in a sample, but this is difficult with complex samples. One solution is to add labeled chemicals to a sample. This research developed an easy-to-use computational tool that locates labeled chemicals, simplifying analysis.

Newswise: Maximizing returns from double-crop soybean
Released: 9-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Maximizing returns from double-crop soybean
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Updated research will help farmers choose maturity group and seeding rate for double-crop soybeans

Newswise: Sensing what plants sense: Integrated framework helps scientists explain biology and predict crop performance
Released: 7-Jun-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Sensing what plants sense: Integrated framework helps scientists explain biology and predict crop performance
Iowa State University

Scientists have invested great time and effort into making connections between a crop’s genotype and its phenotype. But environmental conditions play a role as well. Iowa State University researchers untangle those complex interactions with the help of advanced data analytics in a newly published study.

Newswise: Nanoscale sensors measure elusive water levels in leaves
Released: 3-Jun-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Nanoscale sensors measure elusive water levels in leaves
Cornell University

A breakthrough technology uses nanoscale sensors and fiber optics to measure water status just inside a leaf’s surface, providing a tool to greatly advance our understanding of basic plant biology, and opening the door for breeding more drought-resistant crops.

Newswise: 265859_web.jpg
Released: 25-May-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Road verges provide opportunity for wildflowers, bees and trees
University of Exeter

Road verges cover 1.2% of land in Great Britain - an area the size of Dorset - and could be managed to help wildlife, new research shows.

Newswise: Made in the shade or fun in the sun
Released: 24-May-2021 10:05 PM EDT
Made in the shade or fun in the sun
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers discovered how individual phytochrome isoforms respond differently to light intensity and temperature, enabling land plants to colonize the planet many millions of years ago -- and allowing plants to acclimate to a wide array of terrestrial environments.

Newswise: 265570_web.jpg
Released: 21-May-2021 4:15 PM EDT
First-of-its-kind flower smells like dead insects to imprison 'coffin flies'
Frontiers

The plant Aristolochia microstoma uses a unique trick: its flowers emit a fetid-musty scent that seems to mimic the smell of decomposing insects.

Newswise: Earth’s Vegetation Is Changing Faster Today Than It Has Over the Last 18,000 Years
18-May-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Earth’s Vegetation Is Changing Faster Today Than It Has Over the Last 18,000 Years
University of Wisconsin-Madison

A global survey of fossil pollen has discovered that the planet’s vegetation is changing at least as quickly today as it did when the last ice sheets retreated around 10,000 years ago.

Released: 20-May-2021 1:45 PM EDT
New smartphone app predicts vineyard yields earlier, more accurately
Cornell University

Cornell University engineers and plant scientists have teamed up to develop a low-cost system that allows grape growers to predict their yields much earlier in the season and more accurately than costly traditional methods.

Newswise: Plant Consumers Play Unexpectedly Large Role in the Evolution of Seedling Success
Released: 19-May-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Plant Consumers Play Unexpectedly Large Role in the Evolution of Seedling Success
University of California San Diego

Scientists have found that herbivores have a lot to say about plant evolution and determining the success of seedlings. The influence of birds, rabbits, mice and other herbivores likely counteracts early plant emergence due to climate change, the researchers found.

Newswise:Video Embedded we-ve-got-the-dirt-on-soil-protists
VIDEO
Released: 19-May-2021 10:00 AM EDT
We’ve Got the Dirt on Soil Protists
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

The diverse collection of microbes known as protists are understudied, but their impact on ecosystems and agriculture could be huge.

Newswise: 265237_web.jpg
Released: 18-May-2021 5:05 PM EDT
Swiss farmers contributed to the domestication of the opium poppy
University of Basel

Fields of opium poppies once bloomed where the Zurich Opera House underground garage now stands.

Newswise: Grape genetics research reveals what makes the perfect flower
Released: 18-May-2021 4:45 PM EDT
Grape genetics research reveals what makes the perfect flower
Cornell University

Cornell University scientists have worked with the University of California, Davis, to identify the DNA markers that determine grape flower sex. In the process, they also pinpointed the genetic origins of the perfect flower.

Newswise: New Peanut Has a Wild Past and Domesticated Present
Released: 18-May-2021 11:50 AM EDT
New Peanut Has a Wild Past and Domesticated Present
University of Georgia

The wild relatives of modern peanut plants have the ability to withstand disease in ways that peanut plants can’t. The genetic diversity of these wild relatives means that they can shrug off the diseases that kill farmers’ peanut crops, but they also produce tiny nuts that are difficult to harvest because they burrow deep in the soil.

Newswise: Enhancing Land Surface Models to Grow Perennial Bioenergy Crops
Released: 14-May-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Enhancing Land Surface Models to Grow Perennial Bioenergy Crops
Department of Energy, Office of Science

To understand the effects of expanding biofuel production, scientists must accurately represent biofuel crops in land surface models. Using observations from biofuel plants in the Midwestern United States, researchers simulated two biofuel perennial plants, miscanthus and switchgrass. The simulations indicate these high-yield perennial crops have several advantages over traditional annual bioenergy crops—they assimilate more carbon dioxide, and they require fewer nutrients and less water.

Newswise: Herbivores developed powerful jaws to digest tougher plants following the Mass Extinctions
13-May-2021 5:35 AM EDT
Herbivores developed powerful jaws to digest tougher plants following the Mass Extinctions
University of Bristol

The evolution of herbivores is linked to the plants that survived and adapted after the ‘great dying’, when over 90% of the world’s species were wiped out 252 million years ago.

Newswise: Symbiotic Bacteria In Root Cells May Be Key To Producing Better Crops, Rutgers Study Finds
Released: 12-May-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Symbiotic Bacteria In Root Cells May Be Key To Producing Better Crops, Rutgers Study Finds
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A Rutgers study finds that symbiotic bacteria that colonize root cells may be managed to produce hardier crops that need less fertilizer.

Newswise: 264557_web.jpg
Released: 11-May-2021 3:25 PM EDT
Lichens slow to return after wildfire
University of California, Davis

Lichen communities may take decades -- and in some cases up to a century -- to fully return to chaparral ecosystems after wildfire, finds a study from the University of California, Davis, and Stanford University.

Newswise: 264435_web.jpg
Released: 10-May-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Study finds pretty plants hog research and conservation limelight
Curtin University

New Curtin University research has found a bias among scientists toward colourful and visually striking plants, means they are more likely to be chosen for scientific study and benefit from subsequent conservation efforts, regardless of their ecological importance.

Released: 7-May-2021 9:35 AM EDT
18.5M-year-old vine fossil identified as new species
Cornell University

An 18.5 million-year-old fossil found in Panama provides evidence of a new species and is the oldest reliable example of a climbing woody vine known as a liana from the soapberry family. The discovery sheds light on the evolution of climbing plants.

Released: 3-May-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Free Book on Poisonous Plants in Virginia Available for Download
University of Virginia Health System

An increasing number of Virginians searching for leeks are being poisoned when they instead mistakenly gathered the highly poisonous False Hellebore.

Newswise: 263613_web.jpg
Released: 30-Apr-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Brazilian Amazon released more carbon than it stored in 2010s
University of Exeter

The Brazilian Amazon rainforest released more carbon than it stored over the last decade - with degradation a bigger cause than deforestation - according to new research.

Newswise: Hungry Fungi: White-Rot Fungi Eat All Components of the Wood They Decompose
Released: 30-Apr-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Hungry Fungi: White-Rot Fungi Eat All Components of the Wood They Decompose
Department of Energy, Office of Science

White-rot fungi have an extraordinary ability to break down lignin, a very sturdy material in plant cell walls. To find out what products result when these fungi deconstruct lignin, researchers used synthetic compounds that mimic those produced by lignin breakdown, fed those compounds to the fungi, then tracked the compounds within fungal cells. They found that white-rot fungi uptake lignin deconstruction products and use them as a carbon source for food and building material.

Newswise: Burning the Forest, Not Just the Trees
Released: 30-Apr-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Burning the Forest, Not Just the Trees
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Wildfires affect both the visible parts of plants and the plant microbiome. Understanding these effects helps scientists mitigate the effects of wildfires. This research examined microbial DNA samples from tissues of young quaking aspen saplings after a prescribed burn. Aspen relies largely on fire to regenerate. This work demonstrates that fire affects the entire plant microbiome, not just nearby soil.

Newswise: Vision for ultra-precision agriculture includes machine-learning enabled plant sensing, modeling and robots tending crops
Released: 29-Apr-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Vision for ultra-precision agriculture includes machine-learning enabled plant sensing, modeling and robots tending crops
Iowa State University

Rather than tending fields by the hundreds of acres, farmers could one day tend each plant with the help of machine learning, robots and other technologies. A $7 million grant from the NSF and the USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture will help researchers develop such a cyber-physical system.

Newswise: Dendrobium Signatum and Egg Magnolia – Ultimate Extracts for Skincare. Chula Researchers Champion Thai Herbs to Revive the Thai Economy
Released: 29-Apr-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Dendrobium Signatum and Egg Magnolia – Ultimate Extracts for Skincare. Chula Researchers Champion Thai Herbs to Revive the Thai Economy
Chulalongkorn University

Chula Faculty of Science has found new antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substances from Dendrobium signatum and Egg Magnolia extracts and aims to expand on its economic potential as a natural beauty product.

Newswise:Video Embedded where-in-the-world-are-green-bronx-machine-and-stephen-ritz-april-and-may-2021-sightings
VIDEO
Released: 29-Apr-2021 6:00 AM EDT
Where in the World Are Green Bronx Machine and Stephen Ritz? April and May 2021 Sightings
Green Bronx Machine

From creating and starring in segments for public television’s Let’s Learn children’s series to celebrating National Nutrition Month and Earth Day to preparing for outdoor growing season at its various urban farms, one thing is for sure: Green Bronx Machine (GBM) and its founder Stephen Ritz have been and will be extra busy tending to their communities, people and gardens.

Newswise: 263274_web.jpg
Released: 28-Apr-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Spring forest flowers likely key to bumble bee survival, Illinois study finds
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

For more than a decade, ecologists have been warning of a downward trend in bumble bee populations across North America, with habitat destruction a primary culprit in those losses. While efforts to preserve wild bees in the Midwest often focus on restoring native flowers to prairies, a new Illinois-based study finds evidence of a steady decline in the availability of springtime flowers in wooded landscapes.

Newswise: Rutgers Professor Joan Bennett Elected to American Academy of Arts & Sciences
Released: 28-Apr-2021 10:25 AM EDT
Rutgers Professor Joan Bennett Elected to American Academy of Arts & Sciences
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Joan W. Bennett, a Distinguished Professor of plant biology and pathology at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. She joins neurosurgeon and CNN medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center atmospheric scientist Ann Thompson and media entrepreneur and philanthropist Oprah Winfrey.

20-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Plant Compound Shows Promise Against Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Findings from a new cell study suggest that the natural plant compound sanguinarine could be a promising tool for targeting triple-negative breast cancer cells. The researchers also found that breast cancer cells derived from people with African American ancestry were more sensitive to sanguinarine than those of European origin.

Newswise:Video Embedded preventing-ovarian-cancer-recurrence-with-coffee-markey-launches-unique-clinical-trial
VIDEO
Released: 27-Apr-2021 7:30 AM EDT
Preventing Ovarian Cancer Recurrence with Coffee? Markey Launches Unique Clinical Trial
University of Kentucky

The UK Markey Cancer Center will be the first site worldwide to initiate a cancer clinical trial that evaluates its anti-cancer activity in humans using ArtemiLife™ Inc. coffee products, which are made using the leaves of the Artemisia annua plant.

Newswise:Video Embedded drug-derived-from-kentucky-grown-plant-shows-promise-for-ovarian-cancer-treatment
VIDEO
Released: 26-Apr-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Drug Derived from Kentucky-Grown Plant Shows Promise for Ovarian Cancer Treatment
University of Kentucky

A new study from University of Kentucky Markey Cancer researchers shows that Artemisia annua, a plant that has been traditionally used for its anti-malaria components, shows promise in treating ovarian cancer.

Released: 21-Apr-2021 9:30 AM EDT
Ingredient in Indian Long Pepper Shows Promise Against Brain Cancer in Animal Models
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Piperlongumine, a chemical compound found in the Indian Long Pepper plant, is known to kill cancerous cells in many tumor types. Now an international team including researchers from Penn has illuminated one way in which the piperlongumine works in animal models against glioblastoma.

Newswise: The fight against Palmer amaranth
Released: 21-Apr-2021 8:00 AM EDT
The fight against Palmer amaranth
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Nebraska research team helps identify the best weed control program to help farmers control Palmer amaranth in soybean fields

Newswise: 261776_web.jpg
Released: 14-Apr-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Partial shade from solar panels increase abundance of flowers in late summer
Oregon State University

A new study by Oregon State University researchers found that shade provided by solar panels increased the abundance of flowers under the panels and delayed the timing of their bloom, both findings that could aid the agricultural community.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Auxin makes the spirals in gerbera inflorescences follow the Fibonacci sequence
University of Helsinki

When people are asked to draw the flower of a sunflower plant, almost everyone draws a large circle encircled by yellow petals.

Released: 12-Apr-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Unusual fossil reveals last meal of prehistoric pollinator
University of Bristol

An amber fossil of a Cretaceous beetle has shed some light on the diet of one of the earliest pollinators of flowering plants.


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