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Released: 21-Jun-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Climate Change Is Driving Plant Die-Offs In Southern California, UCI Study Finds
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 21, 2021 – A shift is happening in Southern California, and this time it has nothing to do with earthquakes. According to a new study by scientists at the University of California, Irvine, climate change is altering the number of plants populating the region’s deserts and mountains. Using data from the Landsat satellite mission and focusing on an area of nearly 5,000 square miles surrounding Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, the research team found that between 1984 and 2017, vegetation cover in desert ecosystems decreased overall by about 35 percent, with mountains seeing a 13 percent vegetation decline.

Newswise: Protein Linked to Heart Health, Disease a Potential Therapeutic Target for Dementia
18-Jun-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Protein Linked to Heart Health, Disease a Potential Therapeutic Target for Dementia
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that high levels of a normal protein associated with reduced heart disease also protect against Alzheimer’s-like damage in mice, opening up new approaches to slowing or stopping brain damage and cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer’s.

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Released: 18-Jun-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Newswise Expert Panels on COVID-19 Pandemic: Notable excerpts, quotes and videos available
Newswise

Newswise is hosting a series of Expert Panels discussion on unique aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic. This tip sheet includes some notable quotes from the panelists.

15-Jun-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Depression in Dads of Preemies Deserves More Attention
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

While postpartum depression in new mothers is well recognized and known to increase if the newborn requires intensive care, depression in new fathers has not received much attention. A large study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found that both parents with a baby in the NICU are at risk, with depression symptoms identified in 33 percent of mothers and 17 percent of fathers. Strikingly, the probability of reporting depression symptoms declined significantly for mothers but not for fathers after the baby came home.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Red meat consumption may promote DNA damage-assoc. mutation in colorectal cancer patients
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)

Genetic mutations indicative of DNA damage were associated with high red meat consumption and increased cancer-related mortality in patients with colorectal cancer.

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VIDEO
Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
University of Miami Miller School Study Shows COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines Do Not Impact Male Fertility
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The Pfizer and Moderna mRNA COVID-19 vaccines is safe for male reproduction, according to a new study by University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers published in JAMA , the most widely circulated general medical journal in the world.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 10:40 AM EDT
Commercial video games could help treat mental illness
Lero

Popular video games have the potential to provide low-cost, easy access, effective and stigma-free support for some mental health issues, researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software, have found.

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Released: 16-Jun-2021 4:40 PM EDT
Climate change leads to unprecedented Rocky Mountain wildfires
University of Wyoming

Last fall, the Mullen fire west of Laramie raged for the better part of two months, burning more than 176,000 acres and 70 structures in Wyoming's Carbon and Albany counties, and in Jackson County, Colo.

Newswise: What Factors Put Philippine Birds at Risk of Extinction?
Released: 16-Jun-2021 12:05 PM EDT
What Factors Put Philippine Birds at Risk of Extinction?
University of Utah

A new study from University of Utah researchers suggests that, due to deforestation and habitat degradation, more bird species may be endangered that previously thought – including species that may not have been discovered yet.

Released: 16-Jun-2021 11:35 AM EDT
How Conversations About Race Can Help Black Parents Improve Adolescents' Psychological Outcomes
University of Michigan

Black parents' experiences of racial discrimination can negatively affect their children's psychological outcomes—but talking about these experiences and improving racial socialization competency could help prevent these negative outcomes. according to a new study by a University of Michigan researcher.

15-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
New Cleveland Clinic Research Identifies Link Between Gut Microbes and Stroke
Cleveland Clinic

New findings from Cleveland Clinic researchers show for the first time that the gut microbiome impacts stroke severity and functional impairment following stroke. The results, published in Cell Host & Microbe, lay the groundwork for potential new interventions to help treat or prevent stroke. The research was led by Weifei Zhu, Ph.D., and Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D., of Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute.

10-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Small Numbers of Cells in a Tumor Could Be Key Enablers of Cancer Metastasis
Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

Just a small number of cells found in tumors can enable and recruit other types of cells nearby, allowing the cancer to spread to other parts of the body, report Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center scientists. Working with their research collaborators, the scientists found that ‘enabler cells’ comprise about 20 percent or less of the cells in an aggressive tumor; their small numbers may account for why they are often missed when bulk tissue analyses are used to inform therapeutic decisions.

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VIDEO
14-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
What makes us sneeze?
Washington University in St. Louis

What exactly triggers a sneeze? A team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified, in mice, specific cells and proteins that control the sneeze reflex. Better understanding of what causes us to sneeze — specifically how neurons behave in response to allergens and viruses — may point to treatments capable of slowing the spread of infectious respiratory diseases.

Newswise: For Transplant Recipients, Third Time May Be the Charm for Better COVID Vaccine Protection
Released: 14-Jun-2021 5:15 PM EDT
For Transplant Recipients, Third Time May Be the Charm for Better COVID Vaccine Protection
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a study published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they believe that, for the first time, there is evidence to show that three doses of vaccine increase antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID 19 — more than the standard two-dose regimen for people who have received solid organ transplants.

Newswise: New research finds 1M deaths in 2017 attributable to fossil fuel combustion
Released: 14-Jun-2021 3:25 PM EDT
New research finds 1M deaths in 2017 attributable to fossil fuel combustion
Washington University in St. Louis

Comprehensive evaluation of source sector, fuel contributions to the PM2.5 disease burden analyzed across over 200 countries

Newswise: The Human Ear Detects Half a Millisecond Delay in Sound
Released: 14-Jun-2021 6:05 AM EDT
The Human Ear Detects Half a Millisecond Delay in Sound
Aalto University

Acoustics researchers at Aalto University, in collaboration with professional monitoring loudspeaker manufacturer Genelec, have investigated just how small of a variation in sound delay the human ear can detect in the most sensitive frequency range for hearing. People normally hear sound in the range of 20 and 20,000 hertz.

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VIDEO
Released: 14-Jun-2021 12:05 AM EDT
Fast food, caffeine, & high-glycemic food are associated with mental distress in mature women.
Newswise Trends

The top articles from Newswise is from Binghamton University by Lina Begdache

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Released: 11-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
Combating Maritime Litter
Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon

Plastic bottles drifting in the sea; bags in the stomachs of turtles; Covid-19 masks dancing in the surf: few images are as unpleasant to look at as those that show the contamination of our oceans.

Released: 11-Jun-2021 4:00 PM EDT
Case study shows patient on ketogenic diet living fully with IDH1-mutant glioblastoma
Boston College

A British man who rejected the standard of care to treat his brain cancer has lived with the typically fatal glioblastoma tumor growing very slowly after adopting a ketogenic diet, providing a case study that researchers say reflects the benefits of using the body's own metabolism to fight this particularly aggressive cancer instead of chemo and radiation therapy.

Newswise: Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
Released: 10-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
University of Washington

Endangered blue whales are present and singing off the southwest coast of India. The results provide insight into a poorly studied population and suggest conservation measures should include this region.

Released: 10-Jun-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Study Shows When People with Cerebral Palsy Are Most Likely to Break Bones
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers at Michigan Medicine found people with cerebral palsy have fragile bones that present high fracture risk, but at different times across the lifespan compared to the general population. The results helped them develop new sex-specific critical periods of bone health for this population.

Newswise: Solving Plastic Pollution and Climate Change Simultaneously
Released: 10-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Solving Plastic Pollution and Climate Change Simultaneously
Newswise Trends

Checkout how sea is degraded with plastic and impact of pollution on land and sea.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 4:15 PM EDT
Nearly 1 in 5 Patients Who Die from Unexplained Sudden Cardiac Death Have Suspicious Gene
University of Maryland Medical Center

.Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and their colleagues found that nearly 20 percent of patients with unexplained sudden cardiac death – most of whom were under age 50 – carried rare genetic variants. These variants likely raised their risk of sudden cardiac death.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Listening to Music Near Bedtime Could Lure Sleep-Disrupting ‘Earworms’
Association for Psychological Science

New research published in the journal Psychological Science, however, reveals that earworms can sometimes interject themselves into our dreams, where they can negatively impact our quality of sleep.

Newswise: Laughing gas relieves symptoms in people with treatment-resistant depression
7-Jun-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Laughing gas relieves symptoms in people with treatment-resistant depression
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Chicago have found that a single, one-hour treatment that involves breathing in a mixture of oxygen and the anesthetic drug nitrous oxide — otherwise known as laughing gas — can significantly improve symptoms in people with treatment-resistant depression.

Newswise: SARS-CoV-2 Detectable — Though Likely Not Transmissible — on Hospital Surfaces
Released: 9-Jun-2021 1:40 PM EDT
SARS-CoV-2 Detectable — Though Likely Not Transmissible — on Hospital Surfaces
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered that SARS-CoV-2, or at least its genetic signature, abounds on hospital surfaces, often co-locating with one particular type of bacteria.

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Released: 9-Jun-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Māori connections to Antarctica may go as far back as 7th century, new study shows
Taylor & Francis

Indigenous Māori people may have set eyes on Antarctic waters and perhaps the continent as early as the 7th century, new research published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand shows.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Study Suggests Unmedicated, Untreated Brain Illness is Likely in Mass Shooters
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

The first analysis of medical evidence on domestic mass shooters in the U.S. finds that a large majority of perpetrators have psychiatric disorders for which they have received no medication or other treatment, reports a study in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Generates Robust Immune Responses Against COVID-19 Variants
Released: 9-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Generates Robust Immune Responses Against COVID-19 Variants
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a new study published in Nature, Dan Barouch, MD, PhD, Director of BIDMC's Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, and colleagues report on the antibody and cellular immune responses generated by the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine against the original viral strain and against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. The team found that this vaccine induced immune responses against all the viral variants.

Newswise: Scientists create unique instrument to probe the most extreme matter on Earth
Released: 8-Jun-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Scientists create unique instrument to probe the most extreme matter on Earth
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

PPPL develops novel X-ray crystal spectrometer to measure high energy density plasmas in the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Newswise: How Your Phone Can Predict Depression and Lead to Personalized Treatment
8-Jun-2021 1:50 PM EDT
How Your Phone Can Predict Depression and Lead to Personalized Treatment
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine used a combination of modalities, such as measuring brain function, cognition and lifestyle factors, to generate individualized predictions of depression.

Released: 8-Jun-2021 4:20 PM EDT
Exercise likely to be best treatment for depression in coronary heart disease
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Medical School

A study by RCSI indicates that exercise is probably the most effective short-term treatment for depression in people with coronary heart disease, when compared to antidepressants and psychotherapy or more complex care.

Released: 8-Jun-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Men with sensory loss are more likely to be obese
Anglia Ruskin University

Men who suffer sensory loss, particularly hearing loss, are more likely to be physically inactive and obese than women, according to a new study published in the European Journal of Public Health.

Newswise: The Buck Stops Where? UNH Research Records Longest-Ever Deer Distance
Released: 8-Jun-2021 12:30 PM EDT
The Buck Stops Where? UNH Research Records Longest-Ever Deer Distance
University of New Hampshire

Why did the deer cross the road? According to research from the University of New Hampshire to keep going and going and going. Researchers have discovered the longest distance ever recorded by an adult male white-tailed deer—300 kilometers, or close to 200 miles, in just over three weeks. The finding has important implications for population management and the transmission of disease, especially chronic wasting disease, a fatal neurological disease.

Released: 8-Jun-2021 10:40 AM EDT
Persistent Stereotypes Falsely Link Women’s Self-Esteem to Their Sex Lives
Association for Psychological Science

Despite increases in gender equality and the normalization of casual sex in many cultures, the belief that women who engage in casual sex have low self-esteem remains widespread. New research examines this entrenched stereotype and finds no significant correlation between a woman’s sexual behavior and her self-esteem.

Newswise: First in the World! Chulalongkorn Hospital Successfully Treats a Breast Cancer Patient with Immunotherapy
Released: 8-Jun-2021 8:55 AM EDT
First in the World! Chulalongkorn Hospital Successfully Treats a Breast Cancer Patient with Immunotherapy
Chulalongkorn University

Queen Sirikit Center for Breast Cancer, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society (Chulalongkorn Hospital) has become the world’s first institution to have successfully used immunotherapy to treat a breast cancer patient who is now in complete remission with minimal side effects and uplifted quality of life.

Newswise: Scientists identify a rare magnetic propeller in a binary star system
Released: 7-Jun-2021 4:00 PM EDT
Scientists identify a rare magnetic propeller in a binary star system
University of Notre Dame

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame have identified the first eclipsing magnetic propeller in a cataclysmic variable star system, according to research forthcoming in the Astrophysical Journal.

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Released: 7-Jun-2021 2:55 PM EDT
How coronavirus aerosols travel through our lungs
University of Technology, Sydney

When we inhale isolated coronavirus particles, more than 65% reach the deepest region of our lungs where damage to cells can lead to low blood oxygen levels, new research has discovered, and more of these aerosols reach the right lung than the left.

Newswise: Puerto Rico is Prone to More Flooding Than the Island is Prepared to Handle
Released: 7-Jun-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Puerto Rico is Prone to More Flooding Than the Island is Prepared to Handle
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Puerto Rico is not ready for another hurricane season, let alone the effects of climate change, according to a new study that shows the island’s outstanding capacity to produce record-breaking floods and trigger a large number of landslides.

Newswise: African Great Apes Predicted to Suffer Massive Range Declines in the Next 30 Years, with the Greatest Loss in Unprotected Areas
Released: 7-Jun-2021 11:45 AM EDT
African Great Apes Predicted to Suffer Massive Range Declines in the Next 30 Years, with the Greatest Loss in Unprotected Areas
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study published in the journal Diversity and Distributions predicts massive range declines of Africa’s great apes – gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos – due to the impacts of climate change, land-use changes and human population growth.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 7:00 AM EDT
High Caffeine Consumption may be Associated with Increased Risk of Blinding Eye Disease
Mount Sinai Health System

Frequent caffeine intake could more than triple risk of glaucoma for those genetically predisposed to higher eye pressure

Newswise: ADHD Medications Associated with Reduced Risk of Suicidality in Children with Significant Behavioral Symptoms
2-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
ADHD Medications Associated with Reduced Risk of Suicidality in Children with Significant Behavioral Symptoms
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

ADHD medications may lower suicide risk in children with hyperactivity, oppositional defiance and other behavioral disorders, according to new research from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The findings, published today in JAMA Network Open, address a significant knowledge gap in childhood suicide risk and could inform suicide prevention strategies at a time when suicide among children is on the rise.

Newswise: One in Three Americans Still Practice Unsafe Storage of Popular Laundry Products
Released: 4-Jun-2021 10:40 AM EDT
One in Three Americans Still Practice Unsafe Storage of Popular Laundry Products
American Cleaning Institute

Recent data from American Cleaning Institute shows a need for continued safety education and awareness when it comes to using and storing liquid laundry packets and other household cleaners. As National Safety Month gets underway, ACI is reminding everyone not to forget the common-sense steps we need to take to keep our children safe in the home.

Released: 3-Jun-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Kids who sleep with their pet still get a good night's rest
Concordia University

There is a long-held belief that having your pet sleep on the bed is a bad idea. Aside from taking up space, noisy scratching, or triggering allergies, the most common assertion averred that your furry companion would disrupt your sleep.

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Released: 3-Jun-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Study confirms invasive lionfish now threaten species along Brazilian coast
California Academy of Sciences

Since arriving to the northern Atlantic Ocean less than 30 years ago, lionfish have quickly become one of the most widespread and voracious invasive species, negatively impacting marine ecosystems--particularly coral reefs--from the northeast coast of the United States to the Caribbean Islands.

Released: 3-Jun-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Study Shows Obesity May Increase Risk of Long-Term Complications of COVID-19
Cleveland Clinic

A Cleveland Clinic study shows that survivors of COVID-19 who have moderate or severe obesity may have a greater risk of experiencing long-term consequences of the disease, compared with patients who do not have obesity. The study was recently published online in the journal of Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

Released: 3-Jun-2021 10:25 AM EDT
UNH Research: Black Bears May Play Important Role in Protecting Gray Fox
University of New Hampshire

Bears are known for being devoted and protective of their baby cubs, but research from the University of New Hampshire shows that they may also play a significant role in shielding gray fox from predators like coyotes, who compete with the fox for food and space. The research is one of the first studies to show how black bears provide a buffer to allow other, smaller carnivores to safely co-exist.

Newswise: Tiny implant cures diabetes in mice without triggering immune response
2-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Tiny implant cures diabetes in mice without triggering immune response
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Cornell University have collaborated to implant insulin-secreting beta cells grown from human stem cells into mice with diabetes, to normalize their blood sugar.

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Released: 2-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Study pinpoints key causes of ocean circulation change
University of Exeter

Researchers have identified the key factors that influence a vital pattern of ocean currents.


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