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Released: 7-May-2021 1:40 PM EDT
There is no evidence that vaccines could cause harm to people who have recovered from COVID-19
Newswise

An article published by Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s anti-vaccination organization and widely shared on social media questions the need of vaccinating those who’ve already recovered from COVID-19. The article says there’s a "potential risk of harm, including death" in getting the vaccines. We report this claim as false. There is no evidence that vaccinating people who had previously had COVID is resulting in an increased risk of adverse events.

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Embargo will expire: 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT

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Released: 6-May-2021 4:45 PM EDT
First member of ill-fated 1845 Franklin expedition is identified by DNA analysis
University of Waterloo

With a living descendant's DNA sample, a team of researchers have identified the remains of John Gregory, engineer aboard HMS Erebus

Released: 6-May-2021 4:35 PM EDT
Feeling Younger Buffers Older Adults From Stress, Protects Against Health Decline
American Psychological Association (APA)

People who feel younger have a greater sense of well-being, better cognitive functioning, less inflammation, lower risk of hospitalization and even live longer than their older-feeling peers. A study published by the American Psychological Association suggests one potential reason for the link between subjective age and health: Feeling younger could help buffer middle-aged and older adults against the damaging effects of stress.

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Released: 6-May-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Worth 1000 words: How the world saw Australia's black summer
Queensland University of Technology

Australia's 'black summer' of bushfires was depicted on the front pages of the world's media with images of wildlife and habitat destruction, caused by climate change, while in Australia the toll on ordinary people remained the visual front-page focus.

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Released: 6-May-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Navigational tools: Sharks use Earth’s magnetic fields to find their way home
Florida State University

Each year, many shark species migrate hundreds of miles, traversing ocean waters to return to the same spot year after year. Now, Florida State University researchers have found that sharks likely use the Earth’s magnetic fields to help guide them on these long-distance journeys.

Newswise: Researchers Find Association Between Financial Strain Due to COVID-19 and Depression
Released: 6-May-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Researchers Find Association Between Financial Strain Due to COVID-19 and Depression
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers have found an independent association between COVID-19-related income loss and financial strain and depression, according to the latest study from the COVID-19 Resilience Project, run by the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and Penn Medicine. This association was found in two separate cohorts – one primarily in the United States and one in Israel – and the depressive symptoms worsened over time in participants who were hit financially, above and beyond pandemic-related anxiety. The findings were published today in the Journal of Affective Disorders.

Newswise: We Need to Build More EV Fast-Charging Stations, Researchers Say
Released: 6-May-2021 7:05 AM EDT
We Need to Build More EV Fast-Charging Stations, Researchers Say
University of California San Diego

A team of engineers recommends expanding fast-charging stations for electric vehicles as campuses and businesses start planning for a post-pandemic world. The recommendation is based on a study of charging patterns for electric vehicles on the University of California San Diego campus from early January to late May of 2020, after the university moved most of its operations online. Researchers say the findings can be applied to a broader range of settings.

Newswise: Antarctica Remains the Wild Card for Sea-Level Rise Estimates Through 2100
Released: 5-May-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Antarctica Remains the Wild Card for Sea-Level Rise Estimates Through 2100
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A massive collaborative research project covered in the journal Nature this week offers projections to the year 2100 of future sea-level rise from all sources of land ice, offering the most complete projections created to date.

Newswise:Video Embedded dark-matter-detection
VIDEO
Released: 5-May-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Dark Matter Detection
University of Delaware

University of Delaware’s Swati Singh is among a small group of researchers across the dark matter community that have begun to wonder if they are looking for the right type of dark matter. Singh, Jack Manley, a UD doctoral student, and collaborators at the University of Arizona and Haverford College, have proposed a new way to look for the particles that might make up dark matter by repurposing existing tabletop sensor technology.

Newswise: Bees thrive where it's hot and dry: A unique biodiversity hotspot located in North America
Released: 5-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Bees thrive where it's hot and dry: A unique biodiversity hotspot located in North America
Pensoft Publishers

The United States-Mexico border traverses through large expanses of unspoiled land in North America, including a newly discovered worldwide hotspot of bee diversity.

Newswise: Organ Transplant Recipients Remain Vulnerable to Covid-19 Even After Second Vaccine Dose
Released: 5-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Organ Transplant Recipients Remain Vulnerable to Covid-19 Even After Second Vaccine Dose
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers show that although two doses of a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID 19 — confers some protection for people who have received solid organ transplants, it’s still not enough to enable them to dispense with masks, physical distancing and other safety measures.

Newswise: Meet the freaky fanged frog from the Philippines
Released: 5-May-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Meet the freaky fanged frog from the Philippines
University of Kansas

Researchers at the University of Kansas have described a new species of fanged frog discovered in the Philippines that's nearly indistinguishable from a species on a neighboring island except for its unique mating call and key differences in its genome.

Newswise: Catastrophic Sea-Level Rise from Antarctic Melting is Possible with Severe Global Warming
Released: 5-May-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Catastrophic Sea-Level Rise from Antarctic Melting is Possible with Severe Global Warming
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The Antarctic ice sheet is much less likely to become unstable and cause dramatic sea-level rise in upcoming centuries if the world follows policies that keep global warming below a key 2015 Paris climate agreement target, according to a Rutgers coauthored study. But if global warming exceeds the target – 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) – the risk of ice shelves around the ice sheet’s perimeter melting would increase significantly, and their collapse would trigger rapid Antarctic melting. That would result in at least 0.07 inches of global average sea-level rise a year in 2060 and beyond, according to the study in the journal Nature.

Newswise: Study Shows Independent Evolutionary Origins of Vertebrate Dentitions
5-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Study Shows Independent Evolutionary Origins of Vertebrate Dentitions
University of Bristol

The origins of a pretty smile have long been sought in the fearsome jaws of living sharks which have been considered living fossils reflecting the ancestral condition for vertebrate tooth development and inference of its evolution. However, this view ignores real fossils which more accurately reflect the nature of ancient ancestors.

5-May-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Sugar-Sweetened Drinks Linked to Increased Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Women Under 50
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found a link between drinking sugar-sweetened beverages and an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer in women under age 50. The findings suggest that heavy consumption of sugary drinks during adolescence (ages 13 to 18) and adulthood can increase the disease risk.

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Embargo will expire: 12-May-2021 3:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 5-May-2021 6:05 AM EDT

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Released: 4-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Examining the ‘service cliff’ for youth with autism and their family caregivers
Case Western Reserve University

A team of researchers from the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences interviewed 174 families to examine the use of health, medical and social services for youth with autism

Newswise: CU Cancer Center Technology Gives Kids a Welcome Distraction During Radiation Treatment
Released: 3-May-2021 4:20 PM EDT
CU Cancer Center Technology Gives Kids a Welcome Distraction During Radiation Treatment
University of Colorado Cancer Center

Thirty days of radiation treatments — five days a week, with Saturdays and Sundays off — are difficult for even the toughest of adults. But for a child, they’re even harder to bear. They involve fasting, waking up early, and lying in a dark room alone, without even your parents there for support. But if during treatment you can take a trip to Agrabah to hang out with Aladdin, Jasmine, and the rest of the characters in Disney’s live-action version of “Aladdin,” it makes the sessions a lot easier to bear — not to mention it makes time go by a lot faster. Thanks to a new innovation at the CU Cancer Center, patients like 5-year-old Piper Lardes are able to do just that — watch their favorite show or movie during their treatment to make the whole experience just a little easier. The technology, called Radflix, has a calming effect on parents as well.

Released: 3-May-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Dogs' aggressive behavior towards humans is often caused by fear
University of Helsinki

A study encompassing some 9,000 dogs conducted at the University of Helsinki demonstrated that fearfulness, age, breed, the company of other members of the same species and the owner's previous experience of dogs were associated with aggressive behaviour towards humans.

Newswise:Video Embedded prehistoric-humans-first-traversed-australia-by-superhighways
VIDEO
Released: 3-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Prehistoric humans first traversed Australia by ‘superhighways’
Sandia National Laboratories

An international team of scientists using a Sandia National Laboratories supercomputer in the largest reconstruction ever attempted of prehistoric travel has mapped the probable “superhighways” that led to the first peopling of Australia.

Newswise: CHOP Researchers Discover New Disease that Prevents Formation of Antibodies
3-May-2021 12:05 PM EDT
CHOP Researchers Discover New Disease that Prevents Formation of Antibodies
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Using whole exome sequencing, CHOP researchers discovered the genetic mutation responsible for a condition that prevents patients from making B cells and antibodies to fight infections. The study describing the condition, which CHOP researchers named PU.1 Mutated agammaglobulinemia (PU.MA), was published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Newswise: Newly identified saber-toothed cat is one of largest in history
Released: 3-May-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Newly identified saber-toothed cat is one of largest in history
Ohio State University

A giant saber-toothed cat lived in North America between 5 million and 9 million years ago, weighing up to 900 pounds and hunting prey that likely weighed 1,000 to 2,000 pounds, scientists reported today in a new study.

Released: 2-May-2021 5:05 PM EDT
Volunteer Firefighters Have Higher Levels of “Forever Chemicals”
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Volunteer firefighters — who comprise more than 65 percent of the U.S. fire service — have higher levels of “forever chemicals,” per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), in their bodies than the general public, according to a Rutgers study. It is the first study to evaluate volunteer firefighters’ exposure to PFAS.

Newswise: Care Teams Differ for Black, White Surgical Patients in the Same Hospitals
29-Apr-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Care Teams Differ for Black, White Surgical Patients in the Same Hospitals
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study finds Black patients are more likely to die after their heart bypass surgery if they’re at a hospital where some care teams see mostly white patients and others see mostly Black patients. On the other hand, mortality rates are comparable between Black and white patients after heart bypass surgery when the teams of health care providers at their hospitals all care for patients of all races.

Newswise: Republicans Became More Vaccine Hesitant as the Coronavirus Pandemic Unfolded
Released: 28-Apr-2021 9:05 PM EDT
Republicans Became More Vaccine Hesitant as the Coronavirus Pandemic Unfolded
University of California San Diego

Individuals who self-identify as Republicans became more skeptical of a potential COVID-19 vaccine and other inoculations, such as the flu shot, over the course of the pandemic, reveals a new study by the University of California San Diego’s Rady School of Management.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 2:50 PM EDT
A simple exercise goal protects against unhealthy weight gain
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

New research shows that physical activity equivalent to 100 PAI a week can counteract excessive weight gain.

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Released: 28-Apr-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Spring forest flowers likely key to bumble bee survival, Illinois study finds
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

For more than a decade, ecologists have been warning of a downward trend in bumble bee populations across North America, with habitat destruction a primary culprit in those losses. While efforts to preserve wild bees in the Midwest often focus on restoring native flowers to prairies, a new Illinois-based study finds evidence of a steady decline in the availability of springtime flowers in wooded landscapes.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Restricting internet searches causes stock market instability: study
Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University

The research by RMIT University looked at the ramifications on the stock market following Google's withdrawal from mainland China in 2010.

Newswise:Video Embedded tanning-beds-and-skin-cancer-heeding-the-call-to-action
VIDEO
Released: 28-Apr-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Tanning Beds and Skin Cancer: Heeding the Call to Action
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Public health officials and researchers have become increasingly concerned about the health risks posed by indoor tanning. Researchers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey recently addressed the importance of increasing efforts to limit indoor tanning among minors in a viewpoint paper published in the April 28 2021 online edition of JAMA Dermatology.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 11:20 AM EDT
High consumption at night of branch chain amino acids — found in meats, eggs, fish and nuts — could negatively impact the heart
University of Alabama at Birmingham

A new study published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers shows that an increase in the consumption of branch chain amino acids later in the day could result in a negative effect on cardiovascular health.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 4:45 PM EDT
Middle East and North Africa: Heatwaves of up to 56 degrees Celsius without climate action
CMCC Foundation - Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change

The Middle East and North Africa Region (MENA) is a climate change hot spot where summers warm much faster than in the rest of the world. Some parts of the region are already among the hottest locations globally.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Men's loneliness linked to an increased risk of cancer
University of Eastern Finland

A recent study by the University of Eastern Finland shows that loneliness among middle-aged men is associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Newswise: Breast Cancer Awareness: What Women Must Know
Released: 27-Apr-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Breast Cancer Awareness: What Women Must Know
Newswise

To share important information related to breast cancer, we have compiled some of the latest research news related to breast cancer from top research institutions around the world.

Newswise: Study Shows Facial Emotions are Successfully Encoded in Brains of Those with Autism
Released: 27-Apr-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Study Shows Facial Emotions are Successfully Encoded in Brains of Those with Autism
Stony Brook University

A study led by Stony Brook University that tested neural activity in the brains of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) reveals that they successfully encode facial emotions in their neural signals – and they do so about as well as those without ASD.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Stem Cell Therapy Shows Potential to Heal Intestinal Disease in Premature Infants
Wake Forest Baptist Health

WFIRM scientists are tackling necrotizing enterocolitis with a human placental-derived stem cell (hPSC) therapy strategy that is showing promising results.

Newswise:Video Embedded drug-derived-from-kentucky-grown-plant-shows-promise-for-ovarian-cancer-treatment
VIDEO
Released: 26-Apr-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Drug Derived from Kentucky-Grown Plant Shows Promise for Ovarian Cancer Treatment
University of Kentucky

A new study from University of Kentucky Markey Cancer researchers shows that Artemisia annua, a plant that has been traditionally used for its anti-malaria components, shows promise in treating ovarian cancer.

Newswise: Icy clouds could have kept early Mars warm enough for rivers and lakes, study finds
26-Apr-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Icy clouds could have kept early Mars warm enough for rivers and lakes, study finds
University of Chicago

A new study led by University of Chicago planetary scientist Edwin Kite finds Mars could have had a thin layer of icy, high-altitude clouds that caused a greenhouse effect, allowing rivers and lakes to flow.

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Released: 26-Apr-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Nanobodies inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection
Walter & Eliza Hall Institute

Australian researchers have identified neutralising nanobodies that block the SARS-CoV-2 virus from entering cells in preclinical models.

Newswise: New Study Has Scientists Re-Evaluating Relative Brain Size and Mammalian Intelligence
26-Apr-2021 9:30 AM EDT
New Study Has Scientists Re-Evaluating Relative Brain Size and Mammalian Intelligence
Stony Brook University

Scientists from Stony Brook University and the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior have pieced together a timeline of how brain and body size evolved in mammals over the last 150 million years. The findings will be published in Science Advances.

Newswise: Espresso, latte or decaf? 
Genetic code drives your desire for coffee
25-Apr-2021 12:05 AM EDT
Espresso, latte or decaf? Genetic code drives your desire for coffee
University of South Australia

Whether you hanker for a hard hit of caffeine or favour the frothiness of a milky cappuccino, your regular coffee order could be telling you more about your cardio health than you think. In a world first study of 390,435 people, University of South Australia researchers found causal genetic evidence that cardio health – as reflected in blood pressure and heart rate – influences coffee consumption.

Released: 23-Apr-2021 3:35 PM EDT
People with heart rhythm disorders warned over cannabis use
European Society of Cardiology

A study of 2.4 million hospitalised cannabis users has found that those with an arrhythmia were 4.5 times more likely to die while in hospital than those without.

Newswise: ‘There Is a Job for Everyone, Even Opening Band-Aids’
Released: 22-Apr-2021 4:40 PM EDT
‘There Is a Job for Everyone, Even Opening Band-Aids’
Rush University Medical Center

A 7-year-old patient at Rush University Children’s Hospital named Kashton has been helping get band-aids for the vaccine clinic ready, alongside one of his nurses. Together, they’ve opened hundreds.

Newswise: Pregnant women with COVID-19 face high mortality rate
Released: 22-Apr-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Pregnant women with COVID-19 face high mortality rate
University of Washington School of Medicine

In a worldwide study of 2,100 pregnant women, those who contracted COVID-19 during pregnancy were 20 times more likely to die than those who did not contract the virus.

Released: 22-Apr-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Why climate change is driving some to skip having kids
University of Arizona

When deciding whether to have children, there are many factors to consider: finances, support systems, personal values. For a growing number of people, climate change is also being added to the list of considerations, says a University of Arizona researcher.

Newswise: Among COVID-19 survivors, an increased risk of death, serious illness
Released: 22-Apr-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Among COVID-19 survivors, an increased risk of death, serious illness
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that even mild cases of COVID-19 increase the risk of death in the six months following diagnosis and that this risk increases with disease severity. The comprehensive study also catalogues the wide-ranging and long-term health problems often triggered by the infection, even among those not hospitalized.


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