Feature Channels:

Quantum Mechanics

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
fbshare-Quantum Mechanics

Showing results

110 of 302
Spin_Gilbert_illus_R5_1600x900-web.jpg

Article ID: 711960

The Spin Doctors: Researchers Discover Surprising Quantum Effect in Hard Disk Drive Material

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne scientists have further explored a new effect that enhances their ability to control the direction of electron spin in certain materials. Their discovery may lead to more powerful and energy-efficient materials for information storage.

Released:
25-Apr-2019 3:05 PM EDT
apl_small_horizontal_blue.png

Article ID: 711932

Cool Tool Could Enable Quantum Computers to Tackle More Complex Applications

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

In a paper published in Nature Scientific Reports, APL researchers describe a way to manipulate the critical elements of a quantum computer and their control components that will be an important piece of scaling quantum computer systems to the larger sizes needed for more complex applications.

Released:
25-Apr-2019 12:05 PM EDT
2ndPbubble06.jpg

Article ID: 711576

Electric Skyrmions Charge Ahead for Next-Generation Data Storage

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab has observed chirality for the first time in polar skyrmions in a material with reversible electrical properties – a combination that could lead to more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information, even after they’ve been turned off.

Released:
18-Apr-2019 11:00 AM EDT
198132_web.jpg

Article ID: 711337

Quantum simulation more stable than expected

University of Innsbruck

Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. "A particularly promising application is the solution of quantum many-body problems utilizing the concept of digital quantum simulation", says Markus Heyl from Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex in Dresden, Germany.

Released:
15-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 711207

Oregon scientists drill into white graphene to create artificial atoms

University of Oregon

By drilling holes into a thin two-dimensional sheet of hexagonal boron nitride with a gallium-focused ion beam, University of Oregon scientists have created artificial atoms that generate single photons.

Released:
11-Apr-2019 3:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 711146

The Golden Path towards New Two-Dimensional Semiconductors

Michigan Technological University

Gold atoms ski along boron nitride nanotubes and stabilize in metallic monolayers. The resulting gold quantum dots could be a promising material for future electronics and quantum computing.

Released:
11-Apr-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Dahal-Bishnu_2018.jpg

Article ID: 711067

New electronic materials to carry more energy, more efficiently

South Dakota State University

Material scientists formulated and tested a new cobalt-based Heusler alloy that can host massless particles, known as Weyl fermions, that can carry charge more efficiently.

Released:
10-Apr-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Thiel_4_19_image.jpg

Article ID: 710868

Squeezed nanocrystals: A new model predicts their shape when blanketed under graphene

Ames Laboratory

In a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory and Northeastern University, scientists have developed a model for predicting the shape of metal nanocrystals or “islands” sandwiched between or below two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene. The advance moves 2D quantum materials a step closer to applications in electronics.

Released:
5-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT
uci-full-wordmark-blue.png

Article ID: 710707

UCI scientists are first to observe and image all-important molecular vibrations

University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., April 3, 2019 – By focusing light down to the size of an atom, scientists at the University of California, Irvine have produced the first images of a molecule’s normal modes of vibration – the internal motions that drive the chemistry of all things, including the function of living cells. In a study in Nature, researchers at UCI’s Center for Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit describe how they positioned the atomically terminated silver tip of a scanning tunneling microscope mere ängstroms from its target: a cobalt-based porphyrin molecule affixed to a copper platform.

Released:
3-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Showing results

110 of 302

Chat now!