Latest News

Filters close
Newswise: Center Receives Funding for LGBTQ+ Academic Journal
Released: 23-Sep-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Center Receives Funding for LGBTQ+ Academic Journal
Rutgers School of Public Health

The Rutgers School of Public Health’s Center for Health, Identity, Behavior and Prevention Studies (CHIBPS) has received $25,000 from the PRIDE Alliance People and Business Resource Group at Bristol Myers Squibb to support their journal, Annals of LGBTQ Public and Population Health.

Newswise: 243818_web.jpg
Released: 23-Sep-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Study finds gut microbiome plays important role in sleep regulation
University of Missouri, Columbia

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic sleep condition affecting more than one billion people worldwide.

Released: 23-Sep-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Tiny worlds reveal fundamental drivers of abundance, diversity
Santa Fe Institute

Ecology is traditionally a data-poor discipline, but tiny microbial worlds offer the quantity of data needed to solve universal questions about abundance and diversity. New research in Nature Communications reveals the fundamental relationship between the environment and the species present in a microbial community and can be used as a starting point for investigating bigger systems.

Released: 23-Sep-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Appoints Tiara C. Willie as New Bloomberg Assistant Professor of American Health
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has appointed Tiara C. Willie, PhD, MA, as a Bloomberg Assistant Professor of American Health in the Department of Mental Health.

Released: 23-Sep-2020 10:40 AM EDT
145th Annual Meeting of ANA to feature Pre-event Social Justice Symposium
American Neurological Association (ANA)

ANA demonstrates commitment to diversity and inclusion in neurology and neuroscience by kicking-off the 145th Annual Meeting with Social Justice Symposium.

Newswise: HIV Drugs Could Prevent Diabetes, Study Suggests
Released: 23-Sep-2020 10:30 AM EDT
HIV Drugs Could Prevent Diabetes, Study Suggests
University of Virginia Health System

Patients taking drugs called NRTIs to treat HIV and hepatitis B had a 33% lower risk of developing diabetes.

Newswise: Sanders-Brown Research Discovers New Pathway in TDP-43 Related Dementias
Released: 23-Sep-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Sanders-Brown Research Discovers New Pathway in TDP-43 Related Dementias
University of Kentucky

Recent work published by researchers at the University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) highlights what the lead investigator calls the “cornerstone” of her lab.

Newswise:Video Embedded nasa-s-webb-will-explore-the-cores-of-merging-galaxies
VIDEO
Released: 23-Sep-2020 10:15 AM EDT
NASA's Webb Telescope Will Explore the Cores of Merging Galaxies
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Merging galaxies often appear lit up like a fireworks display. The meeting of their gas flows accelerates star formation and feeds their central black holes. However, much of this activity, particularly where they are interacting, is shrouded by dust. Webb’s significantly more sensitive, sharper observations in infrared light will be able to see through the dust, leading to high-resolution data that will reveal far more about what’s happening at the cores of these galaxies.

Released: 23-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Lack of Key Considerations in FDA Food Chemical Safety Process Leaves Consumers at Risk of Chronic Diseases
Endocrine Society

Today, a group of health, environmental, and consumer organizations challenged the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) practice of not accounting for the cumulative health effect of chemicals in the diet when allowing new chemicals in food. Over 60 years ago, Congress passed a law requiring that FDA and industry do just that. Unfortunately, an Environmental Defense Fund investigation of nearly 900 safety determinations found that only one considered the requirement in a meaningful way.

21-Sep-2020 8:40 AM EDT
One size does not fit all for young-adult binge-drinkers: Research reveals high-risk clusters that may inform future trajectories and treatment interventions
Research Society on Alcoholism

Young adults who binge drink can be categorized within distinct subgroups based on substance use and mental health symptoms, according to research reported in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. Binge drinking in young people is very common and linked to adverse outcomes including academic underachievement, risky behaviors, alcohol poisoning, other substance use, and harm to the brain. While some ‘age out’ of binge-drinking in their mid-to-late 20s, others continue with harmful patterns of alcohol use. Previous research has shown that other substance use and mental health indicators vary widely among binge-drinking youth, and could help explain the differences in trajectories. It is also important to understand young people’s motivation for drinking alcohol to inform why some people naturally reduce and others persist or worsen. In the new study, researchers sought to identify distinct patterns of drinking, drug use, and mental health symptoms among young binge drinkers, an

Released: 23-Sep-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Neurotic College Students Could Benefit From Health Education
Binghamton University, State University of New York

College students are under a lot of stress, even more so lately due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on certain personality types, especially neurotic personalities, college health courses could help students develop a more positive stress mindset, according to research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Released: 23-Sep-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Cleveland Clinic Study Identifies Weight-Loss Threshold for Cardiovascular and Survival Benefits in Patients with Obesity and Diabetes
Cleveland Clinic

A Cleveland Clinic study shows that 5 to 10 percent of surgically induced weight loss is associated with improved life expectancy and cardiovascular health. In comparison, about 20 percent weight loss is necessary to observe similar benefits with a non-surgical treatment. The findings also show that metabolic surgery may contribute health benefits that are independent of weight loss. The study is published in the October issue of Annals of Surgery.

Newswise: Digital Detectives Vie with Tech-Savvy Criminals in Crime Fiction War of Good vs. Evil
Released: 23-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Digital Detectives Vie with Tech-Savvy Criminals in Crime Fiction War of Good vs. Evil
Baylor University

“Whodunnit” may be the big question in crime fiction, but “how they done it” determines whether they will get away with it. These days in detective novels, the war of good and evil increasingly involves technological savvy, says a Baylor University crime fiction researcher.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 29-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 23-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 23-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Women Orthopaedic Surgeons Report High Rates of Sexual Harassment
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

More than two-thirds of women orthopaedic surgeons report experiencing sexual harassment during their residency training, according to a survey study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise:Video Embedded gulf-of-mexico-mission-ocean-blue-holes-are-not-created-equal
VIDEO
Released: 23-Sep-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Gulf of Mexico Mission: ‘Ocean Blue Holes Are Not Created Equal’
Florida Atlantic University

Scientists recently got a unique glimpse into the “Green Banana” Blue Hole thanks to gutsy divers and a 500-pound autonomous, benthic lander. Together with hand-picked, elite scuba divers, the research team is unraveling the structure and behavior of these marine environments by examining geochemistry, hydrodynamics, and biology. Findings from this exploration also may have important implications for phytoplankton in the Gulf of Mexico, including blooms of the Florida Red-tide species Karenia brevis.

Newswise: New NCCN Resource for Understanding Childhood Leukemia
22-Sep-2020 11:05 AM EDT
New NCCN Resource for Understanding Childhood Leukemia
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

NCCN publishes a new patient and caregiver resource focused on a childhood cancer type. Free NCCN Guidelines for Patients: Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) shares the latest expert advice for treating infants, children, and adolescents with the most common pediatric malignancy.

Newswise: Glycans in the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein play active role in infection
18-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Glycans in the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein play active role in infection
American Chemical Society (ACS)

As researchers try to develop therapies/vaccines to combat SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus spike protein is a major focus since it can bind to cells. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have uncovered an active role for glycans in this process, suggesting targets for vaccines and therapies.

Newswise:Video Embedded nationwide-children-s-hospital-and-big-lots-announce-2020-recipient-of-big-lot-s-behavioral-health-scholarship
VIDEO
Released: 23-Sep-2020 5:05 AM EDT
Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Big Lots Announce 2020 Recipient of Big Lot’s Behavioral Health Scholarship
Nationwide Children's Hospital

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Susanne Nyaga, a graduate student at Howard University, is the 2020 recipient of the Big Lots Behavioral Health Scholarship the Columbus, Ohio-based retail company and Nationwide Children’s Hospital announced today.

21-Sep-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Study finds lung transplant patients not given antifungal preventive drugs have higher risk of death
Mayo Clinic

Antifungal preventive medications reduce mortality risk by half in the first year following lung transplantation, according to Mayo Clinic research involving 667 patients who received lung transplants from 2005 to 2018.

Newswise: Life in lockdown: health-wise, it’s not as bad as you think
Released: 22-Sep-2020 10:05 PM EDT
Life in lockdown: health-wise, it’s not as bad as you think
University of South Australia

While Victorians continue to endure restrictions from a second wave of COVID-19, new research from the University of South Australia is providing much-needed good news about people’s overall health and wellbeing following lockdown.

Newswise: Testing time for pills in space
Released: 22-Sep-2020 10:05 PM EDT
Testing time for pills in space
University of Adelaide

Pills are being sent into space to test how they cope with the rigours of one of the harshest environments known. The University of Adelaide is studying how exposure to microgravity and space radiation affects the stability of pharmaceutical tablet formulations. Two separate missions will send science payloads into orbit around Earth: the first will test how tablets cope with the environment inside the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory. The second mission scheduled for early 2021, will test how tablets cope outside the ISS.

Newswise: Houston man’s close call with colon cancer inspires wife to advocate for importance of screening
Released: 22-Sep-2020 5:55 PM EDT
Houston man’s close call with colon cancer inspires wife to advocate for importance of screening
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

When Brenda Sanders, 72, heard about actor Chadwick Boseman’s death due to colon cancer, it brought back intense memories of the close call her husband had with the disease last year.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 5:45 PM EDT
Network Resilience is Key to Surviving Compound Hazard Events, Scientists Say
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

As extreme weather and other events increase in frequency and intensity, cybercriminals ramp up attacks on technologies that tie together urban infrastructure systems, networks critical to the flow of data, people, goods, and services must be made more resilient to failure, according to a team of scientists.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 6-Oct-2020 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 22-Sep-2020 5:30 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 6-Oct-2020 8:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
New vaccine strategy harnesses ‘foot soldier’ T-cells to provide protection against influenza
University of Wisconsin-Madison

As Americans begin pulling up their sleeves for an annual flu vaccine, researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have provided new insights into an alternative vaccine approach that provides broader protection against seasonal influenza.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Shared protein fingerprint could simplify treatment of common inherited heart disease
University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin–Madison scientists discovered that many different genetic mutations result in surprisingly similar changes to heart muscle proteins in patients with the most severe manifestations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

17-Sep-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Kidney Damage From COVID-19 Linked to Higher Risk of In-Hospital Death
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

In an analysis of patients hospitalized with COVID-19, kidney damage associated with the infectious disease was linked with a higher risk of dying during hospitalization.

Newswise: 243590_web.jpg
Released: 22-Sep-2020 4:55 PM EDT
40% of O'ahu, Hawai'i beaches could be lost by mid-century
University of Hawaii at Manoa

The reactive and piecemeal approach historically used to manage beaches in Hawai'i has failed to protect them.

Newswise: Berkeley Team Plays Key Role in Analysis of Particle Interactions That Produce Matter From Light
Released: 22-Sep-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Berkeley Team Plays Key Role in Analysis of Particle Interactions That Produce Matter From Light
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Researchers at Berkeley Lab played a key role in an analysis of data from the world’s largest particle collider that found proof of rare, high-energy particle interactions in which matter was produced from light.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Parkinson's Disease Is Not One, but Two Diseases
Aarhus University

Although the name may suggest otherwise, Parkinson's disease is not one but two diseases, starting either in the brain or in the intestines. Which explains why patients with Parkinson's describe widely differing symptoms, and points towards personalised medicine as the way forward for people with Parkinson's disease.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 4:20 PM EDT
Muslims, atheists more likely to face religious discrimination in US
University of Washington

A new study led by the University of Washington found that Muslims and atheists in the United States are more likely than those of Christian faiths to experience religious discrimination. Researchers focused on public schools and tested how principals responded to an individual’s expression of religious belief.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Did Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Say Her ‘Most Fervent Wish’ Was Not To Be Replaced until a New President is installed?
Newswise

The quote reads: “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new President is installed.” Ginsburg dictated this statement to her granddaughter, Clara Spera, in the days before her death.

Newswise: 242465_web.jpg
Released: 22-Sep-2020 4:10 PM EDT
Evolution of radio-resistance is more complicated than previously thought
Frontiers

The toughest organisms on Earth, called extremophiles, can survive extreme conditions like extreme dryness (desiccation), extreme cold, space vacuum, acid, or even high-level radiation.

Newswise: Common HIV drugs increase a type of immunity in the gut
Released: 22-Sep-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Common HIV drugs increase a type of immunity in the gut
University of Washington School of Medicine and UW Medicine

In this research, the investigators studied the effect of TDF/FTC in patients who were using the drug to prevent HIV, and in the absence of active HIV infection. The researchers observed patients over the past five years and also included data from two earlier studies.

Newswise: 243484_web.jpg
Released: 22-Sep-2020 3:45 PM EDT
When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths
University of Sydney

Mathematicians have developed a framework to determine when regions enter and exit COVID-19 infection surge periods, providing a useful tool for public health policymakers to help manage the coronavirus pandemic.

Newswise: COVID-19 Opens a Partisan Gap on Voting by Mail
Released: 22-Sep-2020 3:35 PM EDT
COVID-19 Opens a Partisan Gap on Voting by Mail
University of California San Diego

Study by UC’s New Electorate Project documents a growing divide on preferences for absentee ballots. Before the pandemic, there wasn’t any difference in the rates at which Democratic and Republican voters actually cast their ballots by mail or in-person. That may change now.

Newswise: 243527_web.jpg
Released: 22-Sep-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Web resources bring new insight into COVID-19
Baylor College of Medicine

Researchers around the world are a step closer to a better understanding of the intricacies of COVID-19 thanks to two new web resources developed by investigators at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of California San Diego.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Nearly 20 percent of americans don't have enough to eat
Pennington Biomedical Research Center

More than 18 percent of U.S. adults do not know whether they will have enough to eat from day to day, and the numbers are worse for Hispanics, Blacks, people with obesity, and women, a new report shows.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
During Busy Wildfire Season (and Pandemic), S&T Focus on Sensors Burns Bright
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

DHS S&T's Smart City Internet of Things Innovation (SCITI) Labs program is bringing together government and private sector partners to identify technologies that can detect and alert emergency management, utilities, and citizens of a threatening wildfire.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 3:00 PM EDT
From pandemic to storms, virtual summit takes on issues facing small island states
University of Delaware

The Virtual Island Summit, held earlier this month and attended by 350 representatives of government, civil society, business and academics from more 60 different countries, addressed the urgency of identifying and implementing technology-based solutions to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Showing results

201250 of 236348

close
1.02891