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Basketball Game Blurs Party Lines

University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

At the end of each legislative session, New Mexico’s senators and representatives lace up to play a hotly-contested basketball game. No one officially tracks how many games each team has won — or any other statistics — because, in the end, the real winners are New Mexicans who face cancer.

Channels: Cancer, Government/Law, Sports,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
Announcement
Higher Education Event
Newswise: Genetic Medicine At Johns Hopkins Gets New Recognition

Genetic Medicine At Johns Hopkins Gets New Recognition

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins was one of the first academic medical centers to recognize the importance of genetics in medicine, establishing divisions of genetics in both the Department of Medicine and the Department of Pediatrics in the late 1950s. Ultimately these units combined, and in 1999 became the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, with an emphasis on understanding the genetic contribution to disease and using this knowledge to develop new treatments and preventive strategies to maintain health. In recognition of the rapidly growing importance of genetics in medicine, Johns Hopkins has launched the Department of Genetic Medicine.

Channels: Education, Genetics, Healthcare, In the Workplace,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: New drug that could aid earlier MS diagnoses approved by FDA for first human clinical trials

New drug that could aid earlier MS diagnoses approved by FDA for first human clinical trials

Case Western Reserve University

A new drug that could make it easier for doctors to diagnose multiple sclerosis (MS) in its earlier stages has been approved for its first human trials by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Channels: All Journal News, Clinical Trials, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, Grant Funded News, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
27-Jan-2020 7:30 AM EST
Announcement
Newswise: Rutgers Students Become First in the Nation to Graduate New Model Nutrition Program

Rutgers Students Become First in the Nation to Graduate New Model Nutrition Program

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers School of Health Professions Pioneers new graduate program to meet changing requirements in the growing field for nutritionists and dietitians

Channels: Education, Healthcare, Nutrition,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 7:05 AM EST
Feature

Infectious diseases to be detected and prevented thanks to £4m grant

University of Warwick

Infectious diseases could be detected, prevented and controlled thanks to a new £4m grant from the NIHR to the University of Warwick. Researchers will work with partners to develop the use of cutting edge genomics to protect public health.

Channels: Drug Resistance, Healthcare, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, Pollution, Public Health, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 6:15 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Algae Shown to Improve Gastrointestinal Health

Algae Shown to Improve Gastrointestinal Health

University of California San Diego

UC San Diego scientists have completed the first study in humans demonstrating that a common algae improves gastrointestinal issues related to irritable bowel syndrome. The green, single-celled organism called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to help with diarrhea, gas and bloating.

Channels: All Journal News, Digestive Disorders, Food Science, Microbiome, Nutrition,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 5:40 AM EST
Announcement
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  • Embargo expired:
    27-Jan-2020 5:00 AM EST

Scientists trace the molecular roots of potentially fatal heart condition

Harvard Medical School

At a glance: Research using heart cells from squirrels, mice and people identifies an evolutionary mechanism critical for heart muscle function Gene defect that affects a protein found in the heart muscle interferes with this mechanism to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a potentially fatal heart condition Imbalance in the ratio of active and inactive protein disrupts heart muscle’s ability to contract and relax normally, interferes with heart muscle’s energy consumption Treatment with a small-molecule drug restores proper contraction, energy consumption in human and rodent heart cells If affirmed in subsequent studies, the results can inform therapies that could halt disease progression, help prevent common complications, including arrhythmias and heart failure

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Healthcare, Heart Disease, Pharmaceuticals, National Institutes of Health (NIH), All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 11:35 AM EST
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