Medical News

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Cornea, Ophthalmology

Researchers Shed Light on Repair Mechanism for Severe Corneal Injuries

In cases of severe ocular trauma involving the cornea, wound healing occurs following intervention, but at the cost of opaque scar tissue formation and damaged vision. Recent research has shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) — which can differentiate into a variety of cells, including bone, cartilage, muscle, and fat cells — are capable of returning clarity to scarred corneas; however, the mechanisms by which this happens remained a mystery – until now. In a study published online today in Stem Cell Reports, researchers from Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear have identified hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), secreted by MSCs, as the key factor responsible for promoting wound healing and reducing inflammation in preclinical models of corneal injury. Their findings suggest that HGF-based treatments may be effective in restoring vision in patients with severely scarred corneas.

Medicine

Channels:

Ted Dawson, Dawson, Valina Dawson, Han Seok Ko, Xiaobo Mao, Parkinson's Disease, Parkinson's, LAG3, Alpha-synuclein, α-synuclein , Brain, Cells

New Treatment Strategy Could Cut Parkinson’s Disease Off at the Pass

AlphaSynAggregates.jpg

Researchers at Johns Hopkins report they have identified a protein that enables a toxic natural aggregate to spread from cell to cell in a mammal’s brain — and a way to block that protein’s action. Their study in mice and cultured cells suggests that an immunotherapy already in clinical trials as a cancer therapy should also be tested as a way to slow the progress of Parkinson’s disease, the researchers say.

Medicine

Channels:

Genetics, Cell Biology, Cancer, RNA, Microrna

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Oct-2016 12:05 AM EDT

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Do Children with Tourette Syndrome Have an Advantage at Language?

tourettestandard.jpg

Children with Tourette syndrome may process aspects of language faster than other children, a new study shows

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, CART, immunotheraphy, Memorial Sloan Kettering, Lymphoma, b-cell lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, tumor suppresor

Memorial Sloan Kettering Researchers Engineer “Micro-Pharmacies” in CAR T Cells to Treat B Cell Lymphomas

There has been much recent excitement about immunotherapy and the use of genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Historically, CAR T cell immunotherapy has aimed to boost the immune system by giving immune cells the information they need to better recognize tumor cells as foreign and attack them. New work led by Hans-Guido Wendel, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and collaborator Karin Tarte of the University of Rennes, France, illustrates an untapped potential of CAR T cells to act as targeted delivery vehicles that can function as “micro-pharmacies” for precise therapeutic delivery. Reported by an international team of researchers and set to publish online in Cell on September 29, this work both defines a critical lesion that leads to lymphoma development and identifies a potential new treatment modality.

Medicine

Channels:

mRNA, Molecular Biology, RNA, Molecules, Enzymes, Genetics

Scientists Discover How Cells Put the Brakes on Protein Production

A new scientific study conducted by a team of leading geneticists has characterized how cells know when to stop translating DNA into proteins, a critical step in maintaining healthy protein levels and cell function.

Medicine

Channels:

Sepsis, sepsis early warning and response tool , sepsis prevention

Pennsylvania Leaders and Pinnacle Health Call on Citizens to Join New Campaign To "Knock Out Sepsis" and Save Lives

04691-sepsis-183MAYatpodium.jpg

Knock Out Sepsis" campaign launched from the Harrisburg State Capitol Rotunda for Sepsis Awareness Month.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, immunotheraphy, immuno-oncology, Oncology, hospital administration

Immunotherapy Authority Joins Rush Cancer Leadership

Kuzel_Timothy1.jpg

A leading authority on developing innovative immunotherapy treatments is Rush' new division chief of the Hematology, Oncology and Cell Therapy. Dr. Dr. Timothy Kuzel, a leading expert on cancer immunotherapies, will focus on continuing to assemble multidisciplinary teams to craft individualized treatments for each patient.

Medicine

Channels:

Lupus, DHA, Environmental Toxin, Fish Oil, crystalline silica, Autoimmune Disorders, Quartz, Environmental Triggers

Omega-3 Fatty Acid Stops Known Trigger of Lupus

A team of Michigan State University researchers has found that consuming an omega-3 fatty acid called DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, can stop a known trigger of lupus and potentially other autoimmune disorders.

Medicine

Channels:

Genetics, Genetic Defect, Mutation

Network and Gene Tools Help Quickly Identify New, Rare Genetic Disease

Using a national network and gene mapping tools, Duke Health researchers led a study identifying a new genetic disorder, which still has no name. It shares similarities to two other rare genetic disorders arising from related genes.

Medicine

Channels:

flu, Flu Season, Flu Vaccination, Flu Vaccine, Influenza

The Medical Minute: What You Need to Know This Flu Season

As flu season approaches, medical experts have some new recommendations – along with some old standards – on how to reduce your chances of getting sick.

Medicine

Channels:

3-D printing, bone implant, nanotechnnology, Pedatrics, Biomaterial, Regeneration

Promising Biomaterial to Build Better Bones with 3-D Printing

Shah-3-D-printed-bonefemur.jpg

A Northwestern University research team has developed a 3-D printable ink that produces a synthetic bone implant that rapidly induces bone regeneration and growth. This hyperelastic “bone” material, whose shape can be easily customized, one day could be especially useful for the treatment of bone defects in children. Antibiotics also can be incorporated into the ink to reduce infection. The printed biomaterial’s many unique properties set it apart from current bone repair materials.

Medicine

Channels:

childhood health, maternal experiences, environmental issues childhood health, Dr. Pathik Wadhwa

UCI to Participate in Major Federal Effort to Improve Childhood Health

The University of California, Irvine’s Development, Health & Disease Research Program has been selected to take part in a $157 million federal initiative to understand how environmental influences from conception through early childhood can affect the health of youngsters and adolescents.

Medicine

Channels:

HPV, Human Papilloma Virus, Human Papilloma Virus (Hpv), human papilloma virus vaccine, Incidence Rates

New Research Shows HPV Vaccine Reduces Cervical Pre-Cancers In Young Women

New research published Sept 29, 2016, in JAMA Oncology shows the HPV vaccine is efficacious in reducing cervical pre-cancers among young women throughout a population. The New Mexico HPV Pap Registry was the data source used in the study. The researchers found that among women who were 15 to 19 years old at the time of a diagnostic cervical biopsy, the incidence rate of cervical abnormalities decreased between 2007 and 2014.

Medicine

Channels:

Enzyme, S. scabies, scabies, potato scabs, toxin removal, 5naa, 5NAA-A, thaxtomin, Pollutants, Bradyrhizobium , Bacteria, Nature Chemical Biology, aminohydrolase, protein crystals, Protein Crystallography, Metalloproteases, Teacher, STEM awards, STEM careers

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Oct-2016 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

Channels:

Sudden Cardiac Death, Cardiac pre-screening, Athletes and sudden cardiac death, Pediatrics, ecg, Exercise-related death, Canadian Journal Of Cardiology

Pre-Screening for Young Athletes at Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death: What Works and What Doesn’t, and at What Cost

Although rare, sudden cardiac death in young athletes raises serious concerns, especially because most victims report no warning symptoms. Pre-participation screening aims to identify children, adolescents, and young adults at risk, but there is not yet consensus regarding the best way to accomplish this. A new report in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology sheds light on this controversial topic by describing a new screening protocol that offers advantages over American Heart Association (AHA) recommendations and shows that the electrocardiogram (ECG) is the best single screening method.

Medicine

Channels:

Neurology, Neuroscience

Aasef Shaikh, MD, PhD, of UH Cleveland Medical Center, Awarded the 2016 Grass Foundation Award in Neuroscience by American Neurological Association

ShaikhAasef.png

Announcement of Aasef Shaikh, MD, PhD, receiving the 2016 Grass Foundation Award in Neuroscience.

Medicine

Channels:

Pancreas, artificial pancreas, Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes Expert at Newyork-Presbyterian Is Available to Discuss FDA Approval of Artificial Pancreas as Both a Physician and Patient

BakerJason.jpg

Medicine

Channels:

Mouthguard, Mouthguards, mouth guards, Dentist, Dentistry, oral, Teeth, Athletics, Sport

Could Mouthguards Improve Athletic Performance?

Medicine

Channels:

Neuro-oncology, Gliomas, Gene Therapy, immuno-oncology, Brain Tumor

Andrew Sloan, MD, of UH Cleveland Medical Center, Awarded Neuro-Oncology Award at 2016 Annual Meeting of Congress of Neurological Surgery

SloanAndy.jpg

Announcement of Neuro-Oncology Award given to Andrew Sloan, MD, by Congress of Neurological Surgery.







Chat now!