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To Reap the Brain Benefits of Physical Activity, Just Get Moving!

Everyone knows that exercise makes you feel more mentally alert at any age. But do you need to follow a specific training program to improve your cognitive function? Science has shown that the important thing is to just get moving. It's that simple. In fact, this was the finding of a study conducted at the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal (IUGM), an institution affiliated with Université de Montréal, by Dr. Nicolas Berryman, PhD, Exercise Physiologist, under the supervision of Dr. Louis Bherer, PhD, and Dr. Laurent Bosquet, PhD, that was published in the journal AGE (American Aging Association) in October.

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Nearly Half of Older Americans Need Support with Daily Routines

About 18 million Americans age 65 and older require help with routine daily activities like bathing, handling medications or meals, finds a new study in Milbank Quarterly. The research shows a growing need for improved services and support for older Americans, their spouses, their children and other "informal caregivers."

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Aging in Place: Does a Loved One Need a Geriatric Assessment?

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By a tremendous margin – over 95 percent – older Americans choose to live at home or with relatives. Families making that choice should consider seeking the assistance of a geriatric specialist, especially when they see changes in their loved one’s behavior, says Bruce R. Troen, MD, chief of the division of geriatrics and palliative medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University at Buffalo.

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Three-Minute Assessment Successfully Identifies Delirium in Hospitalized Elders

Investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have developed a brief and simple method to help hospital care providers recognize delirium in elderly patients

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Insomnia Among Older Adults May Be Tied to Sleep Quality, Not Duration

Reports of insomnia are common among the elderly, but a new study finds that sleep problems may stem from the quality of rest and other health concerns more than the overall amount of sleep that patients get.

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Decreased Ability to Identify Odors Can Predict Death

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The inability of older adults to identify scents is a strong predictor of death within five years. Almost 40% of those who failed a smelling test died during that period, compared to 10% of those with a healthy sense of smell. Olfactory dysfunction predicted mortality better than a diagnosis of heart failure or cancer.

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McMaster Optimal Aging Portal Provides Trusted Voice

Aging baby boomers and others caring for seniors are, more than ever, turning to the Internet to self-diagnose illnesses and find information on issues related to aging, without knowing whether the information is accurate or trustworthy.

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Senators: Widen Medicaid Program for Frail Seniors

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Treating Insomnia in Elderly Reduces Inflammation, Lowers Risk for Chronic Diseases

Insomnia can cause chronic inflammation, which can lead to hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and more. This study finds that curing the insomnia reduces the inflammation and hopefully reduces disease. It also found the best way to cure lack of sleep is through the use of a common psychotherapy treatment—cognitive behavioral therapy.

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Combination Therapy for COPD Associated With Better Outcomes

Among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly those with asthma, newly prescribed long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs) and inhaled corticosteroid combination therapy, compared with newly prescribed LABAs alone, was associated with a lower risk of death or COPD hospitalization, according to a study in the September 17 issue of JAMA.

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