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Cancer Detection, Elastography, passive elastography, Early Diagnosis, shear waves, Tomography, Noninvasive, Stefan Catheline, University of Lyon, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Using Body Noise to Improve Cancer Detection

In passive elastography, the elasticity of tissue is measured using the body’s own propagation of shear waves, which enables more effective imaging deeper inside the body in an even more noninvasive way than traditional elastography and may be used for cancer detection. Stefan Catheline, researcher at the University of Lyon will discuss this and other elastography advances during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

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car horn, pedestrian-friendly, Acoustics, Traffic, honk, Driving, sound modification, Klaxon, SangHwi Jee, Myungjin Bae, Soongsil University, Acoustics ’17 Boston

The Friendly Honk

Sound permeates the human experience and gets our attention, sometimes traumatically so. Consider the car horn. It is a widespread practical application of this noise-trauma-alert principle -- and an increasing source of noise pollution worldwide as the global traffic population grows. It also is the subject of new noise pollution research to be presented during Acoustics ’17 Boston. The study introduces a new pedestrian-friendly car-horn sound identified through the Mean Option Score.

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blood-brain barrier, Noninvasive, Ultrasound, Acoustics, Drug Delivery, cavitation agents, acoustic emissions, Miles M. Aron, University of Oxford, University of Twente, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Tiny Bubbles Offer Sound Solution for Drug Delivery

ASA2017-Aron-Fig3_Cavitation.png

The blood-brain barrier protects the brain and central nervous system from harmful chemicals circulating in the blood but also prevents delivery of drugs that could help treat patients with brain cancers and brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. With recent advances in technology, the blood-brain barrier can now be opened safely, noninvasively and in a targeted manner using ultrasound. One of the newest approaches aiming to advance this research will be presented during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

Science

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Echolocation, human echolocation, echoes, Visually Impaired, Blind, orientation and mobility, Bo N. Schenkman, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Exploring the Potential of Human Echolocation

ASA-Schenkman-subject-test.jpg

People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate safely through the environment using echolocation. Bo Schenkman, an associate professor at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, will present a summary of some aspects of his work on human echolocation during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

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spatial audio, spatial acoustics, acoustic simulation, 3-D visualization, Virtual Reality, multimodal sound, ghost orchestra, personalized audio, Brian F. Katz, Pierre and Marie Curie University, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Seeing With Your Ears

Figure_1_ASA_Katz_3D_audio_IJLRA_AB.jpg

Paris’ Cathedral of Notre Dame has a ghost orchestra that is always performing, thanks to a sophisticated, multidisciplinary acoustics research project that will be presented during Acoustics ’17 Boston. In the project, computer models use recordings from a live concert held at the cathedral and detailed room acoustic simulations to produce a novel type of audience experience: a virtual recreation of the live performance using spatial audio and virtual reality.

Medicine

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Cells, Aging, Telomeres, heaving drinking, biological aging, cellular level, telomere shortening, thiamine deficiency

Drinking Makes You Older at the Cellular Level

The more alcohol that people drink, the more their cells appear to age. In a new study that will be shared at the 40th annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in Denver June 24-28, researchers found that alcoholic patients had shortened telomere lengths, placing them at greater risk for age-related illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and dementia..

Medicine

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Epigenetics, epigenetic reprogramming, genes, Adolescence, Binge Drinking, Brain Development, Brain Chemistry, Psychiatric Problems, early life experiences

Genes Are Not Fixed, Experience and Exposure Can Change Them

Epigenetics refers to how certain life circumstances can cause genes to be silenced or expressed, become dormant or active, over time. New research shows that adolescent binge drinking can lead to epigenetic reprogramming that predisposes an individual to later psychiatric disorders such as anxiety. These data will be shared at the 40th annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in Denver June 24-28.

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Cutting Commercial Building Energy, Low-Temperature Catalyst, Molecular Sunscreen, and More in the DOE Science News Source

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Materials, Materials Science, material sciences, topological, topological matter, 2-D, 2D, Berkeley, Berkeley Lab, LBNL, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UC Berkeley, University of California, Berkeley, 2-D materials, Advanced Light Source, X-Ray, X-rays, photon science

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Jun-2017 11:00 AM EDT

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Cool Power, Stronger Ferromagnets, ADHD Detection, Intelligent Robots, and More in the Engineering News Source

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