Know Your Body: Know Your Risk

Mount Sinai Experts Share Tips for Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month in September

Released: 25-Aug-2014 4:00 PM EDT
Source Newsroom: Mount Sinai Medical Center
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Newswise — New York -- August 25, 2014 -- Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in American women, with about 22,000 diagnosed and 14,000 dying from the disease each year. September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness month and Mount Sinai experts are sharing tips on prevention.

Expert Available for Interview
David A. Fishman, MD, Director of the Mount Sinai Ovarian Cancer Risk Assessment Program and Professor and Fellowship Director in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

“There is no effective surveillance technique for the detection of early stage ovarian cancer, so the only effective way to prevent it and save lives is to identify women at risk,” said Dr. Fishman.

He recommends that women with a family history of ovarian and breast cancers get a formal genetic evaluation by a board-certified genetic counselor. For women who have tested positive for a BRCA mutation or are identified to be at a high risk for developing ovarian cancer, preventive surgery should be considered to remove the ovaries and fallopian tubes before ovarian cancer can develop.

Facts About Ovarian Cancer
• About 75 percent of women with ovarian cancer are diagnosed with late-stage disease. Only 15-40 percent of women survive for five years after initial aggressive cytoreductive surgery that is performed to remove cancerous tissue from the abdominal cavity in combination with chemotherapy.
• Almost 90 percent of women who are diagnosed while the disease is still confined to the ovary (stage I) survive for five years. They also require less surgical intervention, may not require chemotherapy and have a better quality of life.
• After removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes, the risk of developing ovarian cancer is close to zero and the incidence of peritoneal cancer is about 1 percent.

Tips for Ovarian Cancer Prevention
• Family and personal history is important to identify women at increased risk: At least 10 percent of ovarian cancers are attributed to the inheritance of genetic mutations (such as BRCA, HNPCC) that increase the risk of certain cancers (breast, colon, endometrial, thyroid, and melanoma). If you have a history of these cancers in your family (either in men or women), get your risk assessed for ovarian cancer by a board certified genetic counselor.
• Take oral contraceptives: Long term use of oral contraceptives reduces the risk of developing ovarian cancer by approximately 50 percent.
• Pay attention to symptoms: Swollen or bloated abdomen; pressure or pain in abdomen, pelvis, back or legs; difficulty eating or feeling full quickly; nausea, indigestion, gas constipation or diarrhea; feel tired; urinary symptoms; and unusual vaginal bleeding.

New Treatment
Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) is an innovative technique being used by Dr. David Fishman and other oncologists at The Mount Sinai Hospital to treat ovarian cancer in women undergoing cytoreductive surgery. The HIPEC treatment combines cytoreductive surgery with a chemotherapy “bath” that delivers heated chemo directly into the abdomen cavity for two hours. The chemo “bath” then penetrates the diseased tissue, directly killing any remaining cancer cells in the area, destroying undetected cancer cells and preventing them from forming into new tumor while having minimal exposure to the rest of the body.

The Mount Sinai Ovarian Cancer Risk Assessment Program offers high-risk individuals a comprehensive evaluation with a board certified gynecological oncologist and multidisciplinary services, including genetic evaluation (including BRCA analysis), transvaginal sonography, experimental serum tests, and physical examination every six months. The goal of the program is to identify and optimize care for those women who are at increased risk for developing ovarian cancer and to develop new tests to detect those women at risk as well as therapeutic options for women with ovarian cancer.

To learn more, visit http://www.mountsinai.org/patient-care/service-areas/obgyn-and-reproductive-services/areas-of-care/gynecologic-oncology/ovarian-cancer-risk-assessment-program.

To see Mount Sinai’s public service announcement about the Mount Sinai Ovarian Cancer Risk Assessment Program, staring patient Valisia LeKae, Grammy and Tony-nominated Broadway star, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Een8_qoaFF8.

Dr. Fishman and patients enrolled in the Mount Sinai Ovarian Cancer Risk Assessment Program are available for interviews.

About the Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven member hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services—from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care.

The System includes approximately 6,600 primary and specialty care physicians, 12-minority-owned free-standing ambulatory surgery centers, over 45 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, and Long Island, as well as 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the top 20 medical schools both in National Institutes of Health funding and by U.S. News & World Report.

For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org, or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


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