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Embargo will expire: 10-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-May-2021 4:25 PM EDT

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Released: 4-May-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Climate change impacts conservation sites across the Americas
Durham University

A continental-scale network of conservation sites is likely to remain effective under future climate change scenarios, despite a predicted shift in key species distributions.

Newswise: New View of Species Interactions Offers Clues to Preserve Threatened Ecosystems
Released: 30-Apr-2021 1:25 PM EDT
New View of Species Interactions Offers Clues to Preserve Threatened Ecosystems
University of California San Diego

Scientists from around the world have produced a new analysis—believed to be the most detailed study of specialized ecological data from global forests—that is furthering science’s understanding of species interactions and how diversity contributes to the preservation of ecosystem health.

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Released: 23-Apr-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Climate change impacts conservation sites across the Americas
Durham University

A continental-scale network of conservation sites is likely to remain effective under future climate change scenarios, despite a predicted shift in key species distributions.

Released: 23-Apr-2021 10:15 AM EDT
Citizen science data tracks battle of birds vs. bacteria
Cornell University

House finches are locked in a deadly cycle of immunity and new strains of bacterial infection in battling an eye disease that halved their population when it first emerged 25 years ago, according to new research from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Newswise: The Math Behind How Pelicans Surf the Waves
Released: 21-Apr-2021 2:30 PM EDT
The Math Behind How Pelicans Surf the Waves
University of California San Diego

It’s a common sight: pelicans gliding along the waves, right by the shore. These birds make this kind of surfing look effortless, but actually the physics involved that give them a big boost are not simple. Researchers at the University of California San Diego have recently developed a theoretical model that describes how the ocean, the wind and the birds in flight interact in a recent paper in Movement Ecology.

Newswise: Buffalo State Biology Professor Publishes Research on Avian Hybridization
Released: 16-Apr-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Buffalo State Biology Professor Publishes Research on Avian Hybridization
SUNY Buffalo State College

Several biological factors and behavioral traits—like migrating habits and social bonds—play into whether certain species of birds are more likely to produce hybrid offspring than others

Released: 7-Apr-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Why lists of worldwide bird species disagree
University of Utah

Biologists set out to compare four main lists of bird species worldwide to find out how the lists differ—and why. They found that although the lists agree on most birds, disagreements in Southeast Asia and the Southern Ocean could mean that some species are missed by conservation ecologists.

Released: 26-Mar-2021 10:40 AM EDT
International investigation discovers bald eagles’ killer
University of Georgia

Eagle and waterfowl deaths occur in late fall and winter within reservoirs with excess invasive aquatic weeds, and birds can die within five days after arrival.

Released: 24-Mar-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Bald eagle count quadruples, thanks in part to eBird data boost
Cornell University

For the past 50 years, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has been assembling counts of bald eagle nests to track the triumphant recovery of America’s national symbol. But in its new bald eagle population report – tabulated with the help of results using eBird data from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology – the USFWS found many more eagles than previously thought to exist in the Lower 48 states.

Newswise: Penguin hemoglobin evolved to meet oxygen demands of diving
Released: 23-Mar-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Penguin hemoglobin evolved to meet oxygen demands of diving
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Experiments on ancient proteins reveal evolution of better oxygen capture, release

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Released: 12-Mar-2021 12:50 PM EST
Whooping cranes steer clear of wind turbines when selecting stopover sites
Ecological Society of America

As gatherings to observe whooping cranes join the ranks of online-only events this year, a new study offers insight into how the endangered bird is faring on a landscape increasingly dotted with wind turbines.

Newswise: Warming climate slows tropical birds’ population growth rates
Released: 9-Mar-2021 5:10 PM EST
Warming climate slows tropical birds’ population growth rates
University of Utah

Monte Neate-Clegg and colleagues tracked the demographics of 21 bird species over 30 years of observations from a mountain forest in Tanzania. For at least six of the species, their population declined over 30 years could be most attributable to rising temperatures – an effect of a warming world. Smaller birds, as well as those that live at the lower part of their elevation range, were at higher risk for slowed population growth.

Newswise: Backyard chickens risk pathogen spread
Released: 2-Mar-2021 10:25 AM EST
Backyard chickens risk pathogen spread
University of Georgia

Keeping backyard chickens was already on the rise, and the hobby has become even more popular during the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, a University of Georgia researcher cautions that the practice has risks not just for chickens, but for wildlife and people as well.

Newswise: Male Lyrebirds Create an
AUDIO
Released: 25-Feb-2021 12:05 PM EST
Male Lyrebirds Create an "Acoustic Illusion" to Snare Potential Mates
Cornell University

Famous for their uncanny ability to imitate other birds and even mechanical devices, researchers find that Australia’s Superb Lyrebird also uses that skill in a totally unexpected way. Lyrebirds imitate the panicked alarm calls of a mixed-species flock of birds while males are courting and even while mating with a female.

Newswise: Birds and Rural Sprawl
Released: 17-Feb-2021 11:35 AM EST
Birds and Rural Sprawl
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study in the journal Diversity by researchers from Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) finds that bird communities in two rapidly developing rural landscapes react differently to increased “rural sprawl.”

Newswise: Regional variation in the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on data collection
Released: 15-Feb-2021 1:50 PM EST
Regional variation in the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on data collection
Cornell University

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed human behavior, and that has major consequences for data-gathering citizen-science projects such as eBird, run by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Newly published research finds that when human behaviors change, so do the data.

Newswise: Study Finds Even the Common House Sparrow is Declining
Released: 11-Feb-2021 9:25 AM EST
Study Finds Even the Common House Sparrow is Declining
Cornell University

A new study by Cornell Lab of Ornithology scientists aims to clarify the status of the non-native European House Sparrow, using 21 years of citizen science data from the Cornell Lab’s Project FeederWatch.

Newswise: Starling Success Traced to Rapid Adaptation
Released: 9-Feb-2021 11:55 AM EST
Starling Success Traced to Rapid Adaptation
Cornell University

Love them or hate them, there’s no doubt the European Starling is a wildly successful bird. A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines this non-native species from the inside out to learn what exactly happened at the genetic level as the starling population exploded and spread all across North America?

Newswise: As climate change cranks up the heat in the Mojave Desert, not all species are equally affected
3-Feb-2021 3:35 PM EST
As climate change cranks up the heat in the Mojave Desert, not all species are equally affected
Iowa State University

A new study shows how climate change is having a much greater impact on birds than small mammals in the Mojave Desert in the southwestern United States. The study could inform conservation practices and shed new light on how climate change affects various species differently. The research drew on cutting-edge computer modeling as well as survey data from more than 100 years ago.

Newswise: How Many Birds Will You Find?
Released: 28-Jan-2021 9:45 AM EST
How Many Birds Will You Find?
Cornell University

The 24th annual Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) is a great opportunity for all budding birdwatchers and bird-count veterans to use their skills. People from around the world count the birds they see for at least 15 minutes on one or more days of the count, and then enter their checklists online. The GBBC takes place February 12 through 15.

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Released: 25-Jan-2021 12:10 PM EST
Scientists show impact of human activity on bird species
Durham University

Scientists have shown where bird species would exist in the absence of human activity under research that could provide a new approach to setting conservation priorities.

12-Jan-2021 8:45 AM EST
Foraging humans, mammals and birds who live in the same place behave similarly
University of Bristol

Foraging humans find food, reproduce, share parenting, and even organise their social groups in similar ways as surrounding mammal and bird species, depending on where they live in the world, new research has found.

Newswise: Study Examines Attitudes Toward Non-Native Birds
Released: 21-Dec-2020 8:55 AM EST
Study Examines Attitudes Toward Non-Native Birds
Cornell University

A new study from scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines public attitudes toward non-native bird species and whether people are willing to manage them to protect native cavity-nesting birds, such as Eastern Bluebirds and the American Kestrel. The findings are published in the Journal of Environmental Management.

Newswise: Less Light, More Trees Assist Migrating Birds
Released: 9-Dec-2020 2:45 PM EST
Less Light, More Trees Assist Migrating Birds
Cornell University

Scientists from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Colorado State University used observations from the Lab’s eBird citizen-science program to estimate the seasonal species richness of nocturnally migrating passerines within 333 well surveyed urban areas in the contiguous U.S. “Richness” is defined as the number of different species in an area.

Newswise: Holiday Gifts That Give Back to Birds and Nature
Released: 30-Nov-2020 2:50 PM EST
Holiday Gifts That Give Back to Birds and Nature
Cornell University

There's been a huge bump in the number of people connecting with birds and nature as people stuck close to home during this past year, and the trend is continuing. The perfect gift for new—and veteran—birdwatchers is the gift of knowledge. There's so much to learn about birds! Below are holiday gift ideas that are meaningful and environmentally friendly—and your purchase supports the nonprofit conservation work at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Newswise: Study: Clean Air Act Saved 1.5 Billion Birds
Released: 24-Nov-2020 1:55 PM EST
Study: Clean Air Act Saved 1.5 Billion Birds
Cornell University

U.S. pollution regulations meant to protect humans from dirty air are also saving birds. So concludes a new continentwide study published today in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Study authors found that improved air quality under a federal program to reduce ozone pollution may have averted the loss of 1.5 billion birds during the past 40 years.

Newswise: The Impact of Mercury in New York State
Released: 23-Nov-2020 4:05 PM EST
The Impact of Mercury in New York State
Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI)

Biodiversity Research Institute announced that a series of scientific studies that assessed the impact of mercury on air, water, fish, and wildlife in New York State was published in the journal Ecotoxicology, an international journal devoted to presenting critical research on the effects of toxic chemicals on people and the environment.

Released: 17-Nov-2020 3:40 PM EST
Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
University of Exeter

Animals that migrate "live fast and die young", new research shows.

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VIDEO
Released: 10-Nov-2020 8:50 AM EST
Urban gulls adapt foraging schedule to human activity patterns
University of Bristol

If you’ve ever seen a seagull snatch some fries or felt their beady eyes on your sandwich in the park, you'd be right to suspect they know exactly when to strike to increase their chances of getting a human snack. A new study by the University of Bristol is the most in-depth look to date at the foraging behaviours of urban gulls and how they’ve adapted to patterns of human activity in a city.

Newswise: Migration and Molt Affect How Birds Change Their Colors
Released: 6-Nov-2020 4:50 PM EST
Migration and Molt Affect How Birds Change Their Colors
Michigan Technological University

Before the journey, many birds molt their bright feathers, replacing them with a more subdued palette. Watching this molt led scientists to wonder how feather color changes relate to the migrations many birds undertake twice each year.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-provides-first-evidence-of-a-relationship-between-a-bird-s-gut-and-its-brain
VIDEO
Released: 3-Nov-2020 9:00 PM EST
Study Provides First Evidence of a Relationship between a Bird’s Gut and its Brain
Florida Atlantic University

A study of the relationships between cognition and the gut microbiome of captive zebra finches showed that their gut microbiome characteristics were related to performance on a cognitive assay where they learned a novel foraging technique. Researchers also identified potentially critical bacteria that were relatively more abundant in birds that performed better on this assay. This correlation provides some of the first evidence of a relationship between a bird's gut microbiome and its brain.

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Released: 2-Nov-2020 12:35 PM EST
Birdwatching from afar: amazing new AI-enabled camera system to target specific behaviors
Osaka University

A research team from Osaka University has developed an innovative new animal-borne data-collection system that, guided by artificial intelligence (AI), has led to the witnessing of previously unreported foraging behaviors in seabirds.

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Released: 29-Oct-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Antarctica yields oldest fossils of giant birds with 21-foot wingspans
University of California, Berkeley

Fossils recovered from Antarctica in the 1980s represent the oldest giant members of an extinct group of birds that patrolled the southern oceans with wingspans of up to 21 feet that would dwarf the 11½-foot wingspan of today's largest bird, the wandering albatross.

Newswise: Study: Most Migratory Birds Rely On a Greening World
Released: 27-Oct-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Study: Most Migratory Birds Rely On a Greening World
Cornell University

A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology confirms that most birds—but not all—synchronize their migratory movements with seasonal changes in vegetation greenness. This is the first study of its kind to cover the Western Hemisphere during the year-long life cycle of North American migratory birds that feed on vegetation, seeds, nectar, insects, or meat.

Newswise: New study the first to link plastic ingestion and dietary metals in seabirds
Released: 23-Oct-2020 8:20 AM EDT
New study the first to link plastic ingestion and dietary metals in seabirds
University of South Australia

A new study by Australian scientists is the first to find a relationship between plastic debris ingested by seabirds and liver concentrations of mineral metals, with potential links to pollution and nutrition.

Newswise:Video Embedded lily-the-barn-owl-reveals-how-birds-fly-in-gusty-winds
VIDEO
15-Oct-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Lily the barn owl reveals how birds fly in gusty winds
University of Bristol

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College have discovered how birds are able to fly in gusty conditions – findings that could inform the development of bio-inspired small-scale aircraft.

Newswise: World’s greatest mass extinction triggered switch to warm-bloodedness
Released: 16-Oct-2020 12:25 PM EDT
World’s greatest mass extinction triggered switch to warm-bloodedness
University of Bristol

Mammals and birds today are warm-blooded, and this is often taken as the reason for their great success.

Newswise: Impact of Mercury on North American Songbirds
Released: 15-Oct-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Impact of Mercury on North American Songbirds
Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI)

Fifteen papers have recently been published in a special issue of the journal Ecotoxicology. Findings: at least 58 songbird species show demonstrated effects from mercury. The journal’s October 2020 issue presents results of field, laboratory, and museum studies—from Alaska to Maine to Puerto Rico.

Newswise: Mapping out rest stops for migrating birds
Released: 14-Oct-2020 3:30 PM EDT
Mapping out rest stops for migrating birds
University of Delaware

Researchers have developed a new metric called the stopover-to-passage ratio that can help determine if a majority of birds are flying over a particular site or stopping at the site to refuel or rest. This can have important implications for what is done on the ground to help migratory birds.

Newswise: Birds Risk Starvation Trying to “Keep Pace” With Climate Change
Released: 6-Oct-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Birds Risk Starvation Trying to “Keep Pace” With Climate Change
Cornell University

Surviving on a warming planet can be a matter of timing—but simply shifting lifecycle stages to match the tempo of climate change has hidden dangers for some animals, according to new research from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behaviour and Cornell University.

Released: 29-Sep-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Migrations research highlights human impacts on environment
Cornell University

Cornell University ecologists Aaron Rice and Amanda Rodewald are part of a cross-disciplinary effort to understand how human impacts and activities affect animals – from small birds to the largest whales – and the ecosystems we all share.

Newswise: Join Online Events to Celebrate Bird Migration
Released: 16-Sep-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Join Online Events to Celebrate Bird Migration
Cornell University

Day and night, across the country right now, a river of migrating birds is flowing overhead. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology holds its Migration Celebration to take note of this remarkable natural phenomenon. This year, Migration Celebration is taking place virtually with two weeks of special online events, including articles, activities, and live events.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Sharp attention explains why the early bird gets the worm
University at Buffalo

Many of the characteristics related to auditory attention in birds match those of humans, according to a study from the University at Buffalo. The findings published in the journal PLOS ONE provide novel insights into evolutionary survival mechanisms, and are the first to behaviorally measure the cognitive process responsible for a non-human animal’s ability to segregate and respond to meaningful targets heard in simultaneous sound streams.

Newswise:Video Embedded hots-dogs-chicken-wings-and-city-living-helped-wetland-wood-storks-thrive
VIDEO
Released: 31-Aug-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Hot Dogs, Chicken Wings and City Living Helped Wetland Wood Storks Thrive
Florida Atlantic University

Using the Wood Stork, researchers compared city storks with natural wetland storks to gauge their success in urban environments based on their diet and food opportunities. Results provide evidence of how a wetland species persists and even thrives in an urban environment by switching to human foods like chicken wings and hots dogs when natural marshes are in bad shape. These findings indicate that urban areas can buffer a species from the unpredictability of natural food sources.

Newswise: Understanding how birds respond to extreme weather can inform conservation efforts
Released: 21-Aug-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Understanding how birds respond to extreme weather can inform conservation efforts
University of Wisconsin-Madison

How do different bird species respond to extreme weather events that occur for different amounts of time, ranging from weekly events like heat waves to seasonal events like drought? And how do traits unique to different species — for example, how far they migrate or how commonly they occur — predict their vulnerability to extreme weather?

Released: 21-Aug-2020 8:25 AM EDT
Meet the hedge fund managers of avian world
Washington University in St. Louis

In uncertain times, it makes sense to manage risk in your endeavors — whether it’s investing in money-making opportunities or deciding where to lay your eggs. Brood parasites are birds that are known to lay their eggs in other birds’ nests. Cowbirds and cuckoos are among the most famous examples of this group.


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