Feature Channels: Birds

Filters close
Newswise: California Condor Chick Hatches on Live “Condor Cam”
Released: 19-May-2022 3:50 PM EDT
California Condor Chick Hatches on Live “Condor Cam”
Cornell University

A brand-new endangered California Condor chick hatched on May 14, and viewers can watch live as the little one grows up to become a majestic denizen of the skies.

Newswise: Climate crisis is driving cousins of The Lion King character to local extinction
Released: 19-May-2022 2:10 PM EDT
Climate crisis is driving cousins of The Lion King character to local extinction
Frontiers

The yellow-billed hornbill, cousins of fan-favorite Zazu from The Lion King, faces local extinction due to the climate crisis.

Newswise: Avian influenza: How It’s Spreading and What to Know About This Outbreak
18-May-2022 4:20 PM EDT
Avian influenza: How It’s Spreading and What to Know About This Outbreak
Tufts University

A new study from Tufts University and other collaborators takes a data-driven look at influenza viruses circulating among different groups of birds and characterizes which types of birds are involved in spreading the virus. This paper publishes at a time when a highly pathogenic strain of avian influenza has been spreading across North America.

Newswise: Conservationists Find High DDT and PCB Contamination Risk for Critically Endangered California Coastal Condors
Released: 18-May-2022 2:55 PM EDT
Conservationists Find High DDT and PCB Contamination Risk for Critically Endangered California Coastal Condors
San Diego State University

A new study has found contaminants that were banned decades ago are still imperiling critically endangered California condors.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-finds-parrots-use-their-heads-as-a-third-limb
VIDEO
Released: 18-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Study Finds Parrots Use Their Heads as a “Third Limb”
New York Institute of Technology, New York Tech

For the first time, researchers find that parrots climb by using their head as a third “limb.”

Released: 10-May-2022 4:55 PM EDT
What makes some more afraid of change than others?
Louisiana State University

Humans are undoubtedly altering the natural environment. But how wild animals respond to these changes is complex and unclear. In a new study published today, scientists have discovered significant differences in how the brain works in two distinct personality types: those who act fearless and those who seem afraid of new things.

Newswise: Global Bird Populations Steadily Declining
Released: 5-May-2022 9:40 AM EDT
Global Bird Populations Steadily Declining
Cornell University

Staggering declines in bird populations are taking place around the world. So concludes a study from scientists at multiple institutions, published today in the journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources. Loss and degradation of natural habitats and direct overexploitation of many species are cited as the key threats to avian biodiversity. Climate change is identified as an emerging driver of bird population declines.

Newswise: New Regional Bird Guides Simplify Identification
Released: 28-Apr-2022 10:50 AM EDT
New Regional Bird Guides Simplify Identification
Cornell University

There’s a brand-new series of seven field guides to help people learn about the birds found in their region of the United States and Canada.

Released: 28-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Bird populations in eastern Canada declining due to forest ‘degradation,’ research shows
Oregon State University

Bird species that live in wooded areas are under stress from human-caused changes to forest composition, according to new research led by Oregon State University that quantifies the effects of forest “degradation” on bird habitat.

Newswise: Pterosaur discovery solves ancient feather mystery
Released: 21-Apr-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Pterosaur discovery solves ancient feather mystery
University College Cork

Flying reptiles could change the colour of their feathers, research finds.

Newswise: Brains and brawn helped crows and ravens take over the world
18-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Brains and brawn helped crows and ravens take over the world
Washington University in St. Louis

Crows and ravens are well known for their black color and the harsh “caw” sound they make. They are intelligent birds that use tools, solve complex abstract problems and speak a volume of words. But what is less well appreciated is how diverse they are. Their diversity is accompanied by their ability to live all over the world in a variety of habitats.

Newswise: Protected areas don’t always boost biodiversity
Released: 20-Apr-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Protected areas don’t always boost biodiversity
University of Exeter

Protected areas such as national parks have a "mixed impact" on wildlife, according to the largest ever global study of their effects.

Newswise:Video Embedded now-for-the-first-time-see-how-many-migratory-birds-are-passing-over-your-county
VIDEO
Released: 20-Apr-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Now for the First Time, See How Many Migratory Birds Are Passing Over Your County
Cornell University

The BirdCast program at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is exploring these unseen movements of bird migration with its new Migration Dashboard. The Dashboard reveals bird migration in localized detail previously unavailable to the general public.

Released: 15-Apr-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Nationwide maps of bird species can help protect biodiversity
University of Wisconsin-Madison

New, highly detailed and rigorous maps of bird biodiversity could help protect rare or threatened species. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison developed the maps at a fine-enough resolution to help conservation managers focus their efforts where they are most likely to help birds — in individual counties or forests, rather than across whole states or regions.

Newswise:Video Embedded hear-spring-in-a-whole-new-way
VIDEO
Released: 12-Apr-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Hear Spring in a Whole New Way
Cornell University

You can instantly identify birds by sound with the free Merlin Bird ID app from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Its AI-powered sound identification feature recognizes the voices of 458 species in the United States and Canada.

Newswise: Vegetarian birds more sociable than insect eaters, shows research
Released: 6-Apr-2022 3:20 PM EDT
Vegetarian birds more sociable than insect eaters, shows research
University of Bath

Weaver birds that eat seeds flock together and nest in colonies more commonly than those species that eat insects, suggests new research by an international team of scientists led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

Released: 6-Apr-2022 12:55 PM EDT
Cross-College Researchers Unravel Mummy Bird Mystery
Cornell University

Over the last several months, a certain bird – believed to be a sacred ibis – has been drawing a lot of attention, and covering a lot of ground, at Cornell University.

Newswise: Light Pollution Increasing Year Round for Some Migrating Birds
Released: 31-Mar-2022 9:55 AM EDT
Light Pollution Increasing Year Round for Some Migrating Birds
Cornell University

Nighttime light pollution levels are increasing the most in the southeastern United States, Mexico, and Central America—findings based on year-round data collected over the last two decades in the Western Hemisphere.

Newswise: Birds are laying their eggs earlier, and climate change is to blame
Released: 25-Mar-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Birds are laying their eggs earlier, and climate change is to blame
Field Museum

Spring is in the air. Birds are singing and beginning to build their nests.

Newswise: Like father like child – male parents lead young birds on first migration
Released: 25-Mar-2022 11:35 AM EDT
Like father like child – male parents lead young birds on first migration
University of Helsinki

GPS tracking of Caspian terns showed that male parents carry the main responsibility for leading young during their first migration from the Baltic Sea to Africa.

Released: 23-Mar-2022 4:15 PM EDT
Extreme heat harms forest-dwelling bird chicks more than city ones
Frontiers

Forest bird nestlings are significantly smaller and more likely to die as a result of extreme heat compared to their urban counterparts, reports a new study.

Newswise: One bird's joy is another bird's sorrow
Released: 17-Mar-2022 12:25 PM EDT
One bird's joy is another bird's sorrow
Max Planck Society (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft)

Ruffs are characterized by three supergene variants that lead to different appearances and courtship behavior in males.

Newswise: Birds of prey populations across Europe suppressed by lead poisoning from gun ammunition – study
Released: 16-Mar-2022 2:10 PM EDT
Birds of prey populations across Europe suppressed by lead poisoning from gun ammunition – study
University of Cambridge

Poisoning caused by preying on or scavenging animals shot by hunters using lead ammunition has left the populations of many raptors – or birds of prey – far smaller than they should be, according to the first study to calculate these impacts across Europe.

Newswise:Video Embedded do-good-for-birds-science-with-nestwatch
VIDEO
Released: 15-Mar-2022 9:30 AM EDT
Do Good for Birds & Science with NestWatch
Cornell University

One way to witness the wonder of the natural world and do some good at the same time is to participate in the free NestWatch project from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Released: 24-Feb-2022 1:35 PM EST
Researchers predict population trends of birds worldwide
Wiley

In a study published in Ibis, investigators combined the power of big data and machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence, to predict population declines for bird species with unknown population trends and used correlation analyses to identify predictors of bird population declines worldwide.

Released: 24-Feb-2022 11:05 AM EST
Fight or flight? How birds are helping to reveal the mysteries of evolution
University of Massachusetts Amherst

New research from the University of Massachusetts Amherst uncovers the negative link between flightworthiness and fight-worthiness in birds.

Released: 18-Feb-2022 11:05 AM EST
Pollination by birds can be advantageous
University of Bonn

Why have some plant species changed pollinators in their evolution? An international team of researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Suzhou (China) studied the reproductive systems of three sister species pairs, where one species is pollinated by insects and the other by hummingbirds.

Newswise: For female yellowthroats, there’s more than one way to spot a winning mate
11-Feb-2022 10:00 PM EST
For female yellowthroats, there’s more than one way to spot a winning mate
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

One population of female common yellowthroats prefers males with larger black masks, but another group of females favors a larger yellow bib. A new study has found that both kinds of ornaments are linked to superior genes.

4-Feb-2022 6:05 AM EST
Brainy birds may fare better under climate change
Washington University in St. Louis

Many North American migratory birds are shrinking in size as temperatures have warmed over the past 40 years. But those with very big brains, relative to their body size, did not shrink as much as smaller-brained birds, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis. The study is the first to identify a direct link between cognition and animal response to human-made climate change.

Newswise: Golfing cockatoos reveal ability to use combined tools
Released: 8-Feb-2022 5:05 PM EST
Golfing cockatoos reveal ability to use combined tools
University of Birmingham

Cockatoos have shown an extraordinary ability to complete a task by combining simple tools, demonstrating that this cognitive ability is not found only in primates.

Released: 8-Feb-2022 8:30 AM EST
The perilous migratory journey of the eastern whip-poor-will
Ohio State University

Using GPS tags attached to the birds, researchers discovered some surprising facts about the long migrations that eastern whip-poor-wills make from their Midwest breeding grounds to where they winter in Mexico and Central America.

Newswise: Hummingbirds Exert Fine Control Over Body Heat
Released: 2-Feb-2022 9:25 AM EST
Hummingbirds Exert Fine Control Over Body Heat
Cornell University

Scientists from multiple universities now find there’s more than one level of hummingbird torpor: shallow and deep, plus the transition stage between levels of torpor and the normal sleep state.

Newswise: Birds Bring Us Together for the Great Backyard Bird Count
Released: 31-Jan-2022 10:35 AM EST
Birds Bring Us Together for the Great Backyard Bird Count
Cornell University

For a quarter of a century the annual Great Backyard Bird Count has been a bright spot for nature lovers. The 25th edition of the event is coming up February 18 through 21.

Released: 19-Jan-2022 12:30 PM EST
Film reveals efforts to save world’s rarest stork
Cornell University

A new film by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Center for Conservation Media tells the story of Purnima Devi Barman, who has created a movement to save the world's rarest stork.

Released: 14-Jan-2022 1:20 PM EST
Process improves strength, color of feather-based fibers
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Domesticated chickens in the United States alone produce more than 2 billion pounds of feathers annually. Those feathers have long been considered a waste product, especially when contaminated with blood, feces or bacteria that can prove hazardous to the environment.

Newswise: URI student takes birdwatching community by storm, discovers bird never before seen in Rhode Island
Released: 11-Jan-2022 11:45 AM EST
URI student takes birdwatching community by storm, discovers bird never before seen in Rhode Island
University of Rhode Island

Miller found the bird – a species never previously observed in the Ocean State – during an all-day event he organized in which dozens of local birders sought rare birds along the Rhode Island coast.

Released: 17-Dec-2021 4:30 PM EST
Limited brain capacity in humans and birds
Ruhr-Universität Bochum

The working memory is the brain’s ability to process information for a short period of time in a retrievable state.

Newswise: Darwin’s finches ‘evolve’
Released: 16-Dec-2021 8:45 AM EST
Darwin’s finches ‘evolve’
Flinders University

Spending time with offspring is beneficial to development, but it’s proving lifesaving to Galápagos Islands Darwin’s finches studied by Flinders University experts.

Newswise: Bird Singing Contests: A Clash of Culture & Conservation
Released: 8-Dec-2021 10:05 AM EST
Bird Singing Contests: A Clash of Culture & Conservation
Cornell University

For thousands of years, people have been keeping wild birds. It is often a deeply ingrained part of the culture. A Cornell Lab of Ornithology examination of the scientific literature on this topic finds that bird-singing contests currently take place in at least 22 countries using at least 36 species of birds.

Released: 6-Dec-2021 3:30 PM EST
Migratory birds have lighter-colored feathers
Cell Press

Migratory birds are specially adapted to find their way over extreme distances that represent remarkable tests of endurance.

Newswise: eastern_kingbird-2.jpg
Released: 1-Dec-2021 1:15 PM EST
Story tips: For the birds, fresh twist on heat, upcycling plastics and probing for COVID particles
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL story tips: For the birds, fresh twist on heat, upcycling plastics and probing for COVID particles

Newswise: Green Gifts that Benefit Birds, Nature, and People
Released: 30-Nov-2021 10:05 AM EST
Green Gifts that Benefit Birds, Nature, and People
Cornell University

The perfect gift for any birdwatcher is the gift of knowledge. There's always something new to learn about birds! Here are holiday gift ideas that are meaningful and environmentally friendly.

Newswise: KFDV-648.jpg
Released: 22-Nov-2021 11:05 AM EST
Bird study illustrates the interplay between disease transmission and behavior
Iowa State University

A new study that looks at an eye disease in house finches shows how behavior and disease pathology interact to contribute to the spread of a pathogen. The study appears in the academic journal Biology Letters.

Released: 18-Nov-2021 8:50 AM EST
Resilience of vertebrate animals in rapid decline due to manmade threats, study finds
University of Bristol

Global change is eroding life on earth at an unprecedented rate and scale. Species extinctions have accelerated over the last decades, with the concomitant loss of the functions and services they provide to human societies.

Newswise: There May Be More Bird Species in The Tropics Than We Know
Released: 17-Nov-2021 9:00 AM EST
There May Be More Bird Species in The Tropics Than We Know
Cornell University

After a genetic study of the White-crowned Manakin, scientists say it's not just one species and one of the main drivers of its diversity is the South American landscape and its history of change.

Newswise: Introduced birds are not replacing roles of human-caused extinct species
Released: 10-Nov-2021 5:10 PM EST
Introduced birds are not replacing roles of human-caused extinct species
University College London

Human-caused bird extinctions are driving losses of functional diversity on islands worldwide, and the gaps they leave behind are not being filled by introduced (alien) species, finds a new study led by UCL and University of Gothenburg researchers.


Showing results

150 of 644

close
1.21305