Feature Channels: Poverty

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Released: 30-Sep-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Income Tied to Health Disparities in Chicago Parents
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

In Chicago, only 36 percent of parents with low household income reported being in better health, compared to 57 percent of parents with low to middle income and 75 percent of parents with high income, according to a survey released by Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH).

24-Sep-2020 7:05 PM EDT
ACA reduced out-of-pocket health costs for families with kids, but they still need help
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The percentage of low- and middle-income families with children that had burdensome out-of-pocket health care costs fell following the 2014 implementation of the health insurance marketplaces and Medicaid expansion provisions of the Affordable Care Act, known widely as Obamacare,

Newswise: Exploring health risks of poverty, racial discrimination
Released: 24-Sep-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Exploring health risks of poverty, racial discrimination
University of Georgia

Growing up in poverty and experiencing racial discrimination can affect physical health, and researchers at the University of Georgia have been awarded a $10 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to explore how.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Nearly 20 percent of americans don't have enough to eat
Pennington Biomedical Research Center

More than 18 percent of U.S. adults do not know whether they will have enough to eat from day to day, and the numbers are worse for Hispanics, Blacks, people with obesity, and women, a new report shows.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 9:20 AM EDT
County and ZIP code-level data show ‘stark social inequities’ in COVID-19
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

A geocoding approach – linking routinely collected public health data to neighborhood socioeconomic factors – shows consistently higher rates of COVID-19 illness and death among people living in more-disadvantaged communities, reports a study in the November/December Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 21-Sep-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Advancing the accurate tracking of energy poverty
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A novel measurement framework that better aligns with the services people lack rather than capturing the mere absence of physical connections to a source of electricity can help track energy poverty.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 5:30 PM EDT
Vulnerable groups affected by public transit cuts amid pandemic
McGill University

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport agencies across North America have made significant adjustments to services, including cutting trip frequency in many areas while increasing it in others.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Abandoned Buildings, Fear of Calling Police Contribute to High Rate of Fatal Overdoses in Philadelphia, New Study Shows
American University

Abandoned Buildings, Fear of Calling Police Contribute to High Rate of Fatal Overdoses in Philadelphia, New Study Shows

Newswise: Real-time estimates show poverty rose after government benefits expired
Released: 14-Sep-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Real-time estimates show poverty rose after government benefits expired
University of Notre Dame

Research from Notre Dame shows poverty rose a full percentage point from 9.4 percent in the period from April to June to 10.4 percent for July and August.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Latest poverty statistics: U-M experts can discuss
University of Michigan

University of Michigan experts are available to discuss the U.S. Census Bureau's 2019 report on poverty and income statistics, to be released Sept. 15.

Released: 4-Sep-2020 1:40 PM EDT
New weight-loss hope for those with highest obesity risk: Underserved, low-income patients
Pennington Biomedical Research Center

Low-income Louisiana patients enrolled in a tailored obesity intervention program lost much more weight than counterparts receiving usual care.

Newswise: To Improve Research in Underserved Communities, Train Community Health Workers
Released: 27-Aug-2020 4:30 PM EDT
To Improve Research in Underserved Communities, Train Community Health Workers
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

New grant allows for improved training of community health workers to engage minority populations in research where they are often underrepresented and health disparities exist.

Newswise: Rush Medical College Receives Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Engagement
Released: 25-Aug-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Rush Medical College Receives Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Engagement
Rush University Medical Center

Rush Medical College has won the American Association of Academic Medical Colleges Spencer Foreman community engagement award for efforts that “go well beyond the traditional role of academic medicine and reaches communities whose needs are not being met through the traditional health delivery system.”

Newswise: Study Shows Socioeconomic Status Linked to Heart Failure Mortality in United States
Released: 25-Aug-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Study Shows Socioeconomic Status Linked to Heart Failure Mortality in United States
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

A variety of treatments exist to address heart disease, yet it continues to carry a poor prognosis. A new study from University Hospitals showed that a person’s address can help predict their chance of mortality from heart disease.

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Released: 21-Aug-2020 12:45 PM EDT
The impacts of gentrification on transportation and social support
Portland State University

The historically Black district of Albina in Portland, Oregon, due to racist real estate practices, faced multiple displacement events between 1960 and 1990 with the construction of Interstate 5 through the heart of the neighborhood as well as wholesale destruction of hundreds of homes to make room for the Memorial Coliseum and various other urban renewal projects.

Newswise: Systemic Racism Has Consequences for All Life in Cities
12-Aug-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Systemic Racism Has Consequences for All Life in Cities
University of Washington

Social inequalities, specifically racism and classism, are impacting the biodiversity, evolutionary shifts and ecological health of plants and animals in our cities. That’s the main finding of a review paper published Aug. 13 in Science led by the University of Washington, with co-authors at the University of California, Berkeley, and University of Michigan.

Released: 13-Aug-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Impact of family income on learning in children shaped by hippocampus in brain
University of Toronto

A new study by a team of researchers from the University of Toronto (U of T) has identified the region of the brain's hippocampus that links low income with decreased memory and language ability in children.

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Released: 13-Aug-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Public health consequences of policing homelessness
University of Colorado Denver

Two weeks ago, Colorado State Patrol troopers began clearing out nearly 200 residents from homeless encampments that surround the Colorado Capitol.

Released: 7-Aug-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Study: Most Americans don't have enough assets to withstand 3 months without income
Oregon State University

A new study from Oregon State University found that 77% of low- to moderate-income American households fall below the asset poverty threshold, meaning that if their income were cut off they would not have the financial assets to maintain at least poverty-level status for three months.

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Released: 29-Jul-2020 5:30 PM EDT
Social distancing varies by income in US
University of California, Davis

Wealthier communities went from being the most mobile before the COVID-19 pandemic to the least mobile, while poorer areas have gone from the least mobile to the most mobile, according to a study by the University of California, Davis.

27-Jul-2020 3:40 PM EDT
New Study Finds Racial Disparities in COVID-19-related Deaths Exist Beyond Income Differences in 10 Large U.S. Cities
NYU Langone Health

New analyses by a team of researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine examine the interplay between race/ethnicity and income on COVID-19 cases and related deaths in 10 major U.S. cities. The researchers found that non-white counties had higher cumulative incidences and deaths compared to predominantly white counties—and this was true for both low-income and high-income communities.

22-Jul-2020 1:00 PM EDT
COVID-19 and Health Equity: Time to Think Big
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Authors of a new perspective on health inequities say that, in addition to health policy and individual-level efforts, social policy solutions are needed. They identify two key lessons from the pandemic: public policy enables public health and health equity requires big investments in public policy.

Newswise: Faculty Receive Grant to Examine the Economic and Social Impacts of COVID-19 Public Health Policies in Uganda
Released: 16-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Faculty Receive Grant to Examine the Economic and Social Impacts of COVID-19 Public Health Policies in Uganda
Rutgers School of Public Health

Rutgers faculty receive grant to study how COVID-19 policies affect health care utilization, food security, and mental health in sub-Saharan Africa.

9-Jul-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Mind the gap: Even the richest Americans lag the English on health, study finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study shows that middle-aged people living in the U.S. today have worse health than their English counterparts – and that the difference in health between rich and poor is much larger on the American side of the Atlantic.

9-Jul-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Medicaid expansion meant better health for the most vulnerable low-income adults, study finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The most vulnerable residents of Michigan say their health improved significantly after they enrolled in the state’s expanded Medicaid program, a new study finds. Those with extremely low incomes or multiple chronic health problems, and those who are Black, got the biggest health boosts. But participants of all backgrounds reported improvements.

Newswise: sharon-mccutcheon-8lnbXtxFGZw-unsplash-1024x683.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
COVID-19 demonstrates why wealth matters
Washington University in St. Louis

While COVID-19 has impacted all individuals, the impact has not been equal. In a new national Socioeconomic Impact of COVID-19 survey, the Social Policy Institute at Washington University in St. Louis found that liquid assets increased the likelihood that an individual could practice social distancing. However, Black individuals were least likely to afford social distancing.

Released: 26-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Helping consumers in a crisis
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

A new study shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn -- a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy.

Newswise: New poverty measure confirms coronavirus-driven federal stimulus measures were effective
Released: 22-Jun-2020 8:40 AM EDT
New poverty measure confirms coronavirus-driven federal stimulus measures were effective
University of Notre Dame

Notre Dame research finds that the poverty rate fell by 2.3 percentage points from 10.9 percent in the months leading up to the COVID-19 pandemic (January and February) to 8.6 percent in the two most recent months (April and May).

Released: 18-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Homeless Patients Are More Likely to be Readmitted to a Hospital Within 30 Days of Discharge
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Patients who are homeless are far more likely than housed individuals to be readmitted to a hospital within 30 or 90 days of their discharge, according to a new multi-center analysis of inpatient data from Florida, Massachusetts and New York.

Newswise: Homeless people are more likely to be put on ventilators for respiratory infections than non-homeless
Released: 17-Jun-2020 5:40 PM EDT
Homeless people are more likely to be put on ventilators for respiratory infections than non-homeless
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Researchers from UCLA, Harvard Medical School and the University of Tokyo found that during a recent six-year period, homeless people in New York state were more likely to hospitalized and treated with mechanical ventilators for respiratory infections than people who are not homeless. These findings have implications for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Released: 17-Jun-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Association between morbidity and poverty reversed during early US COVID-19 epidemic
Frontiers

The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the USA was on January 20, 2020 in Washington State. Since then, there have been over two million confirmed cases and 113,000 deaths in the country.

Newswise:Video Embedded black-lives-matter-and-de-funding-the-police-newswise-live-event-for-june-16-2pm-edt
VIDEO
Released: 17-Jun-2020 8:40 AM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Defund or Reform? BLM and Policing Expert Panel: Newswise Live Event for June 16, 2PM EDT
Newswise

Black Lives Matter and "De-funding the Police": Newswise Live Event for June 16, 2PM EDT

Newswise: Survey: In Vermont, Pandemic’s Impact Falling Disproportionately on Lower Income Groups
Released: 15-Jun-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Survey: In Vermont, Pandemic’s Impact Falling Disproportionately on Lower Income Groups
University of Vermont

High percentages of Vermonters agree with the state's pandemic-inspired social distancing measures and have complied with them. But their actions have come at a significant economic cost, especially for low income Vermonters, one of several ways this group has been disproportionately affected.

Newswise:Video Embedded cash-me-outside-transfers-to-the-poor-linked-to-eco-benefits
VIDEO
9-Jun-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Cash Me Outside: Transfers to the Poor Linked to Eco-Benefits
Johns Hopkins University

In a new study, researchers recently discovered that Indonesia’s national anti-poverty program reduced deforestation by about 30%.

Released: 11-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Nurseries Forced to Support Families in Poverty Through Coronavirus Crisis, Research Shows
University of Sheffield

Nursery staff are having to provide food and help families with benefit claims as the coronavirus pandemic impacts parents with young children, according to new research by the University of Sheffield and Early Education, an early years providers’ membership body.

Released: 11-Jun-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Food for Thought
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

Some people must make the difficult decision whether to put food on the table or spend money on other necessities, such as a utility bill or rent. In a recently published paper, Jean McDougall, PhD, and colleagues report the results of a 400-person survey that assesses food insecurity before and after cancer diagnosis

Newswise: What are smallholder farms?
Released: 8-Jun-2020 8:00 AM EDT
What are smallholder farms?
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Smallholder farms supply majority of world’s food supply but still face poverty.

Newswise: Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities
Released: 28-May-2020 8:10 AM EDT
Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities
Ohio State University

New research provides insight into how housing prices and neighborhood values have become polarized in some urban areas, with the rich getting richer and the poor becoming poorer.

Newswise: UniSA brings industry expertise and research together 
to strive for Zero homelessness
Released: 28-May-2020 4:45 AM EDT
UniSA brings industry expertise and research together to strive for Zero homelessness
University of South Australia

The pursuit of zero homelessness in Australia is one step closer this week as renowned social change expert and Industry Adjunct with the University of South Australia, David Pearson, is appointed as the first CEO for the Australian Alliance to End Homelessness.

Released: 27-May-2020 4:45 PM EDT
Anxiety needs global health attention
King's College London

Led by King's College London in collaboration with the University of Zimbabwe and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and published in The Lancet's EClinicalMedicine journal, the research examined a group of people with depression in Zimbabwe and found that people are nearly three times more likely to suffer this illness long-term if they also have a high level of anxiety.

Newswise: New Study Finds That Access to Education and Markets Vital for Coastal Fishing Communities Adapting to a Warming and Changing World
Released: 21-May-2020 5:40 PM EDT
New Study Finds That Access to Education and Markets Vital for Coastal Fishing Communities Adapting to a Warming and Changing World
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study investigating the links between coastal communities and coral reefs in Kenya and Madagascar has found that access to education and markets can help mitigate acute vulnerabilities for communities struggling with poverty and reliant on ecosystems degraded by overfishing.

Newswise: $5 Million Grant from Oprah Winfrey Accelerates Rush and City’s COVID-19 Prevention Efforts on West, South Sides
Released: 20-May-2020 4:55 PM EDT
$5 Million Grant from Oprah Winfrey Accelerates Rush and City’s COVID-19 Prevention Efforts on West, South Sides
Rush University Medical Center

Oprah Winfrey Charitable Foundation has donated $5M to accelerate Rush and West Side United-led efforts to help West Side neighborhoods prevent and battle COVID-19

Newswise: Surviving the coronavirus while black: Pandemic's heavy toll on African American mental health
Released: 20-May-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Surviving the coronavirus while black: Pandemic's heavy toll on African American mental health
University of Michigan

ANN ARBOR—Black communities in the United States have been disproportionately affected by the number of coronavirus cases and deaths. At the same time, white nationalist activities have increased in the last months.Riana Elyse AndersonRiana Anderson, assistant professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, discusses how these trends are affecting the mental health of African Americans.

Released: 20-May-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Inspiring stories from women like themselves helped these moms improve their diet
Ohio State University

When researchers asked overweight low-income moms who should be in study videos promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors, moms said they wanted to see themselves. The researchers obliged. And the intervention they designed produced the desired results when it came to improving participants’ diet.

Released: 14-May-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Launches New Institute for Health Equity Research
Mount Sinai Health System

COVID-19 Crisis Spurs Institute to Understand and Combat Health Disparities in Underserved Communities. Earvin “Magic” Johnson, five-time NBA champion, and New York State Senator Brian Benjamin Among Industry and Public Health Leaders to Join Institute Task Force.

Newswise: New Data-Driven Approach for Communities At Risk for Severe COVID-19 Outcomes
Released: 8-May-2020 12:00 PM EDT
New Data-Driven Approach for Communities At Risk for Severe COVID-19 Outcomes
LifeBridge Health

A Maryland Taskforce on Vulnerable Populations for COVID-19 this week began implementing a data-driven approach to identifying communities and individuals at highest risk for severe outcomes from COVID-19. They are using this data and mapping to guide the deployment of outreach and resources to vulnerable populations including homeless, elderly living in congregate dwellings and those with limited healthcare access. This is a unique approach to battling COVID-19 that could be adopted nationally.


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