Feature Channels: Poverty

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Released: 29-Jul-2020 5:30 PM EDT
Social distancing varies by income in US
University of California, Davis

Wealthier communities went from being the most mobile before the COVID-19 pandemic to the least mobile, while poorer areas have gone from the least mobile to the most mobile, according to a study by the University of California, Davis.

27-Jul-2020 3:40 PM EDT
New Study Finds Racial Disparities in COVID-19-related Deaths Exist Beyond Income Differences in 10 Large U.S. Cities
NYU Langone Health

New analyses by a team of researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine examine the interplay between race/ethnicity and income on COVID-19 cases and related deaths in 10 major U.S. cities. The researchers found that non-white counties had higher cumulative incidences and deaths compared to predominantly white counties—and this was true for both low-income and high-income communities.

22-Jul-2020 1:00 PM EDT
COVID-19 and Health Equity: Time to Think Big
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Authors of a new perspective on health inequities say that, in addition to health policy and individual-level efforts, social policy solutions are needed. They identify two key lessons from the pandemic: public policy enables public health and health equity requires big investments in public policy.

Newswise: Faculty Receive Grant to Examine the Economic and Social Impacts of COVID-19 Public Health Policies in Uganda
Released: 16-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Faculty Receive Grant to Examine the Economic and Social Impacts of COVID-19 Public Health Policies in Uganda
Rutgers School of Public Health

Rutgers faculty receive grant to study how COVID-19 policies affect health care utilization, food security, and mental health in sub-Saharan Africa.

9-Jul-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Mind the gap: Even the richest Americans lag the English on health, study finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study shows that middle-aged people living in the U.S. today have worse health than their English counterparts – and that the difference in health between rich and poor is much larger on the American side of the Atlantic.

9-Jul-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Medicaid expansion meant better health for the most vulnerable low-income adults, study finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The most vulnerable residents of Michigan say their health improved significantly after they enrolled in the state’s expanded Medicaid program, a new study finds. Those with extremely low incomes or multiple chronic health problems, and those who are Black, got the biggest health boosts. But participants of all backgrounds reported improvements.

Newswise: sharon-mccutcheon-8lnbXtxFGZw-unsplash-1024x683.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
COVID-19 demonstrates why wealth matters
Washington University in St. Louis

While COVID-19 has impacted all individuals, the impact has not been equal. In a new national Socioeconomic Impact of COVID-19 survey, the Social Policy Institute at Washington University in St. Louis found that liquid assets increased the likelihood that an individual could practice social distancing. However, Black individuals were least likely to afford social distancing.

Released: 26-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Helping consumers in a crisis
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

A new study shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn -- a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy.

Newswise: New poverty measure confirms coronavirus-driven federal stimulus measures were effective
Released: 22-Jun-2020 8:40 AM EDT
New poverty measure confirms coronavirus-driven federal stimulus measures were effective
University of Notre Dame

Notre Dame research finds that the poverty rate fell by 2.3 percentage points from 10.9 percent in the months leading up to the COVID-19 pandemic (January and February) to 8.6 percent in the two most recent months (April and May).

Released: 18-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Homeless Patients Are More Likely to be Readmitted to a Hospital Within 30 Days of Discharge
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Patients who are homeless are far more likely than housed individuals to be readmitted to a hospital within 30 or 90 days of their discharge, according to a new multi-center analysis of inpatient data from Florida, Massachusetts and New York.

Newswise: Homeless people are more likely to be put on ventilators for respiratory infections than non-homeless
Released: 17-Jun-2020 5:40 PM EDT
Homeless people are more likely to be put on ventilators for respiratory infections than non-homeless
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Researchers from UCLA, Harvard Medical School and the University of Tokyo found that during a recent six-year period, homeless people in New York state were more likely to hospitalized and treated with mechanical ventilators for respiratory infections than people who are not homeless. These findings have implications for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Released: 17-Jun-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Association between morbidity and poverty reversed during early US COVID-19 epidemic
Frontiers

The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the USA was on January 20, 2020 in Washington State. Since then, there have been over two million confirmed cases and 113,000 deaths in the country.

Newswise:Video Embedded black-lives-matter-and-de-funding-the-police-newswise-live-event-for-june-16-2pm-edt
VIDEO
Released: 17-Jun-2020 8:40 AM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Defund or Reform? BLM and Policing Expert Panel: Newswise Live Event for June 16, 2PM EDT
Newswise

Black Lives Matter and "De-funding the Police": Newswise Live Event for June 16, 2PM EDT

Newswise: Survey: In Vermont, Pandemic’s Impact Falling Disproportionately on Lower Income Groups
Released: 15-Jun-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Survey: In Vermont, Pandemic’s Impact Falling Disproportionately on Lower Income Groups
University of Vermont

High percentages of Vermonters agree with the state's pandemic-inspired social distancing measures and have complied with them. But their actions have come at a significant economic cost, especially for low income Vermonters, one of several ways this group has been disproportionately affected.

Newswise:Video Embedded cash-me-outside-transfers-to-the-poor-linked-to-eco-benefits
VIDEO
9-Jun-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Cash Me Outside: Transfers to the Poor Linked to Eco-Benefits
Johns Hopkins University

In a new study, researchers recently discovered that Indonesia’s national anti-poverty program reduced deforestation by about 30%.

Released: 11-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Nurseries Forced to Support Families in Poverty Through Coronavirus Crisis, Research Shows
University of Sheffield

Nursery staff are having to provide food and help families with benefit claims as the coronavirus pandemic impacts parents with young children, according to new research by the University of Sheffield and Early Education, an early years providers’ membership body.

Released: 11-Jun-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Food for Thought
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

Some people must make the difficult decision whether to put food on the table or spend money on other necessities, such as a utility bill or rent. In a recently published paper, Jean McDougall, PhD, and colleagues report the results of a 400-person survey that assesses food insecurity before and after cancer diagnosis

Newswise: What are smallholder farms?
Released: 8-Jun-2020 8:00 AM EDT
What are smallholder farms?
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Smallholder farms supply majority of world’s food supply but still face poverty.

Newswise: Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities
Released: 28-May-2020 8:10 AM EDT
Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities
Ohio State University

New research provides insight into how housing prices and neighborhood values have become polarized in some urban areas, with the rich getting richer and the poor becoming poorer.

Newswise: UniSA brings industry expertise and research together 
to strive for Zero homelessness
Released: 28-May-2020 4:45 AM EDT
UniSA brings industry expertise and research together to strive for Zero homelessness
University of South Australia

The pursuit of zero homelessness in Australia is one step closer this week as renowned social change expert and Industry Adjunct with the University of South Australia, David Pearson, is appointed as the first CEO for the Australian Alliance to End Homelessness.

Released: 27-May-2020 4:45 PM EDT
Anxiety needs global health attention
King's College London

Led by King's College London in collaboration with the University of Zimbabwe and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and published in The Lancet's EClinicalMedicine journal, the research examined a group of people with depression in Zimbabwe and found that people are nearly three times more likely to suffer this illness long-term if they also have a high level of anxiety.

Newswise: New Study Finds That Access to Education and Markets Vital for Coastal Fishing Communities Adapting to a Warming and Changing World
Released: 21-May-2020 5:40 PM EDT
New Study Finds That Access to Education and Markets Vital for Coastal Fishing Communities Adapting to a Warming and Changing World
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study investigating the links between coastal communities and coral reefs in Kenya and Madagascar has found that access to education and markets can help mitigate acute vulnerabilities for communities struggling with poverty and reliant on ecosystems degraded by overfishing.

Newswise: $5 Million Grant from Oprah Winfrey Accelerates Rush and City’s COVID-19 Prevention Efforts on West, South Sides
Released: 20-May-2020 4:55 PM EDT
$5 Million Grant from Oprah Winfrey Accelerates Rush and City’s COVID-19 Prevention Efforts on West, South Sides
Rush University Medical Center

Oprah Winfrey Charitable Foundation has donated $5M to accelerate Rush and West Side United-led efforts to help West Side neighborhoods prevent and battle COVID-19

Newswise: Surviving the coronavirus while black: Pandemic's heavy toll on African American mental health
Released: 20-May-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Surviving the coronavirus while black: Pandemic's heavy toll on African American mental health
University of Michigan

ANN ARBOR—Black communities in the United States have been disproportionately affected by the number of coronavirus cases and deaths. At the same time, white nationalist activities have increased in the last months.Riana Elyse AndersonRiana Anderson, assistant professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, discusses how these trends are affecting the mental health of African Americans.

Released: 20-May-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Inspiring stories from women like themselves helped these moms improve their diet
Ohio State University

When researchers asked overweight low-income moms who should be in study videos promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors, moms said they wanted to see themselves. The researchers obliged. And the intervention they designed produced the desired results when it came to improving participants’ diet.

Released: 14-May-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Launches New Institute for Health Equity Research
Mount Sinai Health System

COVID-19 Crisis Spurs Institute to Understand and Combat Health Disparities in Underserved Communities. Earvin “Magic” Johnson, five-time NBA champion, and New York State Senator Brian Benjamin Among Industry and Public Health Leaders to Join Institute Task Force.

Newswise: New Data-Driven Approach for Communities At Risk for Severe COVID-19 Outcomes
Released: 8-May-2020 12:00 PM EDT
New Data-Driven Approach for Communities At Risk for Severe COVID-19 Outcomes
LifeBridge Health

A Maryland Taskforce on Vulnerable Populations for COVID-19 this week began implementing a data-driven approach to identifying communities and individuals at highest risk for severe outcomes from COVID-19. They are using this data and mapping to guide the deployment of outreach and resources to vulnerable populations including homeless, elderly living in congregate dwellings and those with limited healthcare access. This is a unique approach to battling COVID-19 that could be adopted nationally.

Released: 4-May-2020 8:15 AM EDT
FIELDING FOCUS | Public Health in a Pandemic: COVID-19 & Vulnerable Populations
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health has launched FIELDING FOCUS, a webinar discussion series that has begun with weekly curated conversations addressing public health and COVID-19. During upcoming sessions, we will explore the impact that the current pandemic is having on vulnerable populations (May 5) and on wellness and healthy living (May 12). Additional sessions are in the planning stages.

Newswise:Video Embedded fau-nurses-provide-ppe-for-homeless-low-income-individuals-during-pandemic
VIDEO
Released: 30-Apr-2020 8:30 AM EDT
FAU Nurses Provide PPE for Homeless, Low Income Individuals During Pandemic
Florida Atlantic University

A team of FAU nurses is addressing the dire needs of a low income neighborhood in West Palm Beach by spearheading programs to provide lifesaving PPE such as face masks for those in need during the COVID-19 pandemic. People living in poverty as well as homeless individuals and those struggling with social determinants of health are at a higher risk of contracting COVID-19 and dying from it.

Newswise: 230302_web.jpg
Released: 28-Apr-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Urban slums are uniquely vulnerable to COVID-19. Here's how to help.
University of California, Berkeley

Government-enforced social isolation may help relatively affluent populations limit the spread of COVID-19, but these measures can be devasting for the nearly 1 billion people around the globe currently dwelling in urban slums, where physical space is scarce, and many rely on daily wage labor for survival.

Newswise: 230257_web.jpg
Released: 27-Apr-2020 5:15 PM EDT
COVID-19 could spell the end of an egalitarian National Health Service
City University London

Dr Sabrina Germain, a Senior Lecturer in The City Law School, says the COVID-19 pandemic could signal the end of the National Health Service based on the liberal egalitarian conception of distributive justice.

Newswise: Identifying the Dark Matter of the Molecular World
Released: 20-Apr-2020 12:00 AM EDT
Identifying the Dark Matter of the Molecular World
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scientists have deployed artificial intelligence to identify more of the billions of metabolites that are currently unknown. The small molecules underlie and inform every aspect of our lives, including energy production, the fate of the planet, and our health. “Beast Mode” helps explain how they did it.

Newswise: 229349_web.jpg
Released: 16-Apr-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Harris Poll: Most Americans want government intervention to reduce inequality
Lehigh University

A new poll finds that a majority of Americans now say the federal government should actively seek to reduce inequality, amid the worsening economic crisis produced by Covid-19.

Released: 16-Apr-2020 8:35 AM EDT
تلقى الأشخاص المشردون علاجًا أقل للنوبات القلبية في المستشفيات، ولديهم معدلات أعلى لإعادة القبول في المستشفيات
Mayo Clinic

صار التشرد أزمة اجتماعية ومشكلة صحية عامة حول العالم، ما يؤثر على الناس من جميع الأعمار. معظم المشردين متضررون ويحظون بالقليل من الموارد، وربما يتمتعون أو لا يتمتعون بتأمين صحي كافٍ. المرض العقلي ومعاقرة المخدرات أو الكحول من المشاكل الشائعة في مجتمع المشردين. واحتمالية إصابة من يعيشون في الشوارع بمرض القلب كبيرة. بل وقدرتهم على رعاية صحتهم قليلة كذلك.

10-Apr-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Exploring the link between education and climate change
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

What are the most effective ways to achieve desired sustainable development outcomes? A new study brings together several different connections between education and climate change and evaluates them together.

Newswise: ACA has helped protect low-income patients from catastrophic spending for surgery
Released: 8-Apr-2020 6:25 PM EDT
ACA has helped protect low-income patients from catastrophic spending for surgery
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

n the years after 2014, when the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance marketplaces were established, low-income patients who underwent a surgical procedure saved an average of $601 in out-of-pocket spending and $968 in premium spending per year, compared to before the marketplaces existed. Those low-income patients also had a 35% lower chance of having catastrophic levels of household medical spending. However, for middle-income patients, spending levels were about the same before and after the marketplaces began.

Released: 8-Apr-2020 3:20 PM EDT
Researchers map areas of major Texas cities where residents are most likely to need hospitalization, ICU care for COVID-19
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Areas within Texas’ major metropolitan cities where residents are at the greatest risk for hospitalization and critical care due to COVID-19 have been mapped for the first time by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Released: 6-Apr-2020 8:25 AM EDT
Las personas sin hogar que sufren un ataque cardíaco reciben menos tratamiento en el hospital y muestran tasas mayores de reingreso
Mayo Clinic

El sinhogarismo se ha convertido en una crisis social y un problema de la salud pública en todo el mundo y afecta a gente de toda edad. La mayoría de las personas sin hogar están en desventaja porque tienen menos recursos y, posiblemente, no cuentan con un buen seguro de salud.

Newswise: Making a home among the stacks
Released: 3-Apr-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Making a home among the stacks
West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

Since transferring to WVU in fall 2017, Connecticut native Déja Fleury has found a home-away-from-home in Morgantown. Nearly three years later, the social work major is helping the local library feel more like home for its patrons.

Released: 2-Apr-2020 4:45 PM EDT
Could Intermittent Lockdown Save Us - and the Economy - From the Coronavirus?
Weizmann Institute of Science

Weizmann Institute scientists present a mathematical model for an exit strategy: how to restart the economy after the crisis

27-Mar-2020 10:55 AM EDT
Housing Insecurity May Increase Risk of Kidney Disease
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• In a study of urban-dwelling individuals, housing insecurity was linked with a higher risk of developing albuminuria, a sign of kidney disease.

Newswise: Cedars-Sinai Giving More Than $2M to Help Those Affected by COVID-19
Released: 27-Mar-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Cedars-Sinai Giving More Than $2M to Help Those Affected by COVID-19
Cedars-Sinai

With COVID-19 spreading across the Los Angeles region, Cedars-Sinai is contributing more than $2 million to programs that provide housing, food assistance and access to healthcare for those in need. The immediate funding infusion comes on top of the $15 million Cedars-Sinai committed last year to support safety-net organizations and the communities they serve.


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