Feature Channels: Poverty

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Embargo will expire: 18-Jan-2022 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 15-Jan-2022 11:00 AM EST

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Released: 13-Jan-2022 5:15 PM EST
Advance child tax credits reduced us food insufficiency by 26 percent
Boston University School of Medicine

January 15 will mark the first time in seven months that the families of more than 61 million children in the United States will not receive a monthly payment of the advance Child Tax Credit (CTC), after Congress failed to pass the Build Back Better Act, which would extend this benefit enacted last spring as part of the Biden administration’s COVID-19 relief package.

Newswise: New JAMA Study on COPD Detection in Lower Income Countries
Released: 11-Jan-2022 11:55 AM EST
New JAMA Study on COPD Detection in Lower Income Countries
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

How to better detect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in low- and middle-income countries is a question that has long plagued the global medical community.

21-Dec-2021 3:20 PM EST
Homelessness Increases Serious Illness, Emergency Room Visits During Heat Waves
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego researchers in the Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health, Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Department of Emergency Medicine, discuss the health impacts of heat waves on people experiencing homelessness, emergency department visits and which characteristics make them at-risk.

Released: 13-Dec-2021 12:15 PM EST
Exploring the link between access to electricity and fertility
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

Access to electricity and modern cooking fuels increases the wellbeing of women and allow them to make informed reproductive choices, according to a new study just published in Nature Sustainability.

13-Dec-2021 10:05 AM EST
Chicago study finds individual housing dramatically reduced coronavirus rates in at-risk people experiencing homelessness
University of Chicago Medical Center

Providing individual hotel rooms with supports to people experiencing homelessness who were at high risk of severe COVID-19 led to a 2.5-fold decrease in SARS-CoV-2 rates compared to rates seen in Chicago city shelters, as well as improvements in other health measures and housing outcomes.

Newswise: What Will It Take to Nourish Everyone on the Planet?
Released: 1-Dec-2021 11:20 AM EST
What Will It Take to Nourish Everyone on the Planet?
Tufts University

Tufts' Patrick Webb talks about the major food security and nutrition challenges around the world, how his new lab plans to address those needs, and how even small choices by individuals can make a difference.

Newswise: The Challenge Before Us
Released: 30-Nov-2021 12:05 PM EST
The Challenge Before Us
Rutgers School of Public Health

Rutgers School of Public Health alum, Molly McCauley GSNB’89, MPH’89, reflects on the pandemic and steps that need to be taken to eliminate health disparities.

Released: 30-Nov-2021 7:05 AM EST
Climate action can lessen poverty and inequality worldwide
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

A new international study shows that the redistribution of revenues from a carbon tax can promote equity and protect marginalized populations.

Released: 29-Nov-2021 11:00 AM EST
Climate action can lessen poverty and inequality worldwide
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

According to a Rutgers study, if all countries adopted the same tax on carbon emissions and returned the revenues to their citizens, it is possible to keep the global temperature from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius while also benefiting wellbeing, reducing inequality, and alleviating poverty.

Released: 25-Nov-2021 2:30 PM EST
Crowdsourcing data to monitor progress on the SDGs
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

A new IIASA-led study explored the use of a citizen science tool known as Picture Pile to see how it could contribute to monitoring progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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Released: 23-Nov-2021 8:15 AM EST
Harnessing the Power of CRISPR to Reduce Poverty and Malnutrition
Innovative Genomics Institute

A new partnership between the IGI and CGIAR will ensure that the latest genomic innovations in agriculture will reach those who can most benefit around the world.

Released: 18-Nov-2021 8:00 AM EST
Study: Low income, male gender or urban setting each tied to higher risk of hospital readmission
University at Buffalo

University at Buffalo research found that patients who earn less than $38,000 per year, identify as male or were treated in an urban hospital have a higher risk of being readmitted to a hospital within a month of discharge. The factors were associated with increased readmissions for patients treated for heart failure, pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction, and acute exacerbation of COPD.

Released: 11-Nov-2021 3:10 PM EST
Poverty, racism and the public health crisis in America
University of Houston

Although extreme poverty in the United States is low by global standards, the U.S. has the worst index of health and social problems as a function of income inequality.

Newswise: Environmental policy expert explores the promise of forests to alleviate poverty
Released: 4-Nov-2021 4:50 PM EDT
Environmental policy expert explores the promise of forests to alleviate poverty
University of Notre Dame

Notre Dame's Daniel C. Miller and his colleagues highlight the uneven distribution of the harmful effects that deforestation has on local people who rely on forests.

Newswise: Mini ‘mod’ homes can help rough sleepers get off the streets for good – UK study
Released: 19-Oct-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Mini ‘mod’ homes can help rough sleepers get off the streets for good – UK study
University of Cambridge

A new study on the first modular mini-homes in England created for those experiencing homelessness has found that – combined with “wraparound support” – these small, inexpensive units made from factory-built components help to restore the health, relationships and finances of residents.

Released: 19-Oct-2021 11:45 AM EDT
People love the billionaire, but hate the billionaires’ club
Ohio State University

Americans may respect and admire how individual billionaires – think Oprah Winfrey or Bill Gates – made their fortunes, even as they rage against the “top 1%” as a group, new research finds.

18-Oct-2021 5:30 PM EDT
People with cancer and cancer survivors in low-income and rural areas face greater risk of suicide
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Cancer is an unwelcome blow for anyone, but those diagnosed with cancer who live in low-income and rural areas face an increased risk of suicide compared with those living in high-income and urban areas, according to a study by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston).

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Released: 5-Oct-2021 8:50 AM EDT
Using data science to combat poverty
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

In January 2021, Empa and BASE (Basel Agency for Sustainable Energy) were among the winners of the prestigious Inclusive Growth and Recovery Challenge by data.org, a platform for partnerships committed to build the field of data science for social impact. In their project, the team is developing a mobile app that aims to give smallholder farmers in rural India advice on how to better store their fresh foods and when to sell them. Eight months into the project, the team has forged partnerships with cooling solution providers, collected open-source data for India, and developed digital food twins.

4-Oct-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Medicaid expansion closed health gaps for low-income adults across racial and ethnic groups, study shows
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Michiganders from multiple racial and ethnic backgrounds say their health has improved and they have access to regular care through a doctor’s office, after enrolling in the state’s Medicaid expansion for low-income adults, a new study finds.

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Released: 1-Oct-2021 5:40 PM EDT
2021 E.R. Brown Symposium | "Opening Doors for All: Improving Health in Housing and Homelessness"
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Join the Fielding School's UCLA Center for Health Policy Research (UCLA CHPR) as the center brings together public health leaders, community advocates, policymakers, and other thought leaders to help identify past successes and lessons learned, so that California can invest effectively with evidence-based solutions to creating a healthier, more prosperous California for all.

Newswise: Tufts University Receives $25 Million Challenge Grant from Schuler Education Foundation to Increase Number of Pell Grant-Eligible Students and Students with Undocumented Status
Released: 28-Sep-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Tufts University Receives $25 Million Challenge Grant from Schuler Education Foundation to Increase Number of Pell Grant-Eligible Students and Students with Undocumented Status
Tufts University

Tufts University has received a $25 million challenge grant from the Schuler Education Foundation, co-founded by Tufts alumni Jack Schuler and his daughter, Tanya Schuler Sharman, to expand its financial aid support of low-income students, including those whose family income qualifies them for federal Pell Grants, and students with undocumented status.

Released: 24-Sep-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Child abuse and neglect linked to early death in adulthood
University College London

Children who experience sexual or physical abuse or are neglected are more likely to die prematurely as adults, according to a new study analysing data from the 1950s to the present by researchers at UCL and the University of Cambridge.

Released: 15-Sep-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Dying at home, lack of healthcare contribute to COVID’s hidden death toll
Boston University School of Medicine

The official US death count for COVID-19 has now surpassed 650,000, but the true death toll is likely much higher.

Newswise: Green Bronx Machine's Stephen Ritz to Testify Before the U.S. Congress About Ending Hunger in America
Released: 14-Sep-2021 5:30 PM EDT
Green Bronx Machine's Stephen Ritz to Testify Before the U.S. Congress About Ending Hunger in America
Green Bronx Machine

Stephen Ritz, acclaimed teacher, founder of Green Bronx Machine and best-selling author of The Power of a Plant: A Teacher’s Odyssey to Grow Healthy Minds and Schools, has been invited by United States Congressman James P. McGovern (MA-02), Chairman of the House Rules Committee, to testify before Congress on the role of schools in ending hunger and improving nutrition. Ritz will testify on Wednesday, September 15 at 11:00 a.m. His testimony can be viewed live at: https://youtu.be/AoB13ifdO6I.

Released: 2-Sep-2021 8:55 AM EDT
How Much Energy Do We Need to Achieve a Decent Life for All?
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

IIASA researchers have assessed how much energy is needed to provide the global poor with a decent life and have found that this can be reconciled with efforts to meet climate targets.

Released: 1-Sep-2021 12:20 PM EDT
UA Little Rock researchers explore challenges faced by homeless LGBTQ adults in Arkansas
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Criminal justice researchers at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock are investigating the unique challenges and barriers faced by homeless LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning) adults in Arkansas. LGBTQ adults experience a number of negative obstacles in life, such as discrimination, stigmatization, and victimization, that make the population especially vulnerable to experiencing homelessness.

Released: 1-Sep-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Food Insecurity During College Years Linked to Lower Graduation Rate
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A study led by a researcher at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that food insecurity among college students is associated with lower college graduation rates and lower chances of obtaining a bachelor’s or advanced degree

Released: 27-Aug-2021 4:30 PM EDT
New study shows rundown neighborhoods not slated to go into a steep decline
University of California, Davis

Scholars and criminologists have examined the relationship between urban decay and violent crime for decades.

Newswise:Video Embedded breakthrough-cases-and-covid-boosters-live-expert-panel-for-august-18-2021
VIDEO
Released: 19-Aug-2021 3:00 PM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Breakthrough Cases and COVID Boosters: Live Expert Panel for August 18, 2021
Newswise

Expert Q&A: Do breakthrough cases mean we will soon need COVID boosters? The extremely contagious Delta variant continues to spread, prompting mask mandates, proof of vaccination, and other measures. Media invited to ask the experts about these and related topics.

Newswise: Research Finds Hundreds of Millions of Africans Lack Basic Means of Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Transmission
Released: 19-Aug-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Research Finds Hundreds of Millions of Africans Lack Basic Means of Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Transmission
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Research team led by Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, finds almost 900 million Africans live without on-site water, while 700 million people lack in-home soap/washing facilities

Released: 18-Aug-2021 1:30 PM EDT
New Study Planned to Help Understand Oral Health Outcomes for Children in Low-Income Areas
University of Illinois Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago researchers have received funding from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, a branch of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, for a five-year study to understand the oral health of children in low-income communities. Caries — or cavities — is the most common disease of childhood and can result in serious health issues including pain, difficulty eating, speech problems, and infections which can lead to hospitalization and surgeries for tooth extractions.

Newswise: Study: As cities grow in size, the poor 'get nothing at all'
Released: 17-Aug-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Study: As cities grow in size, the poor 'get nothing at all'
Santa Fe Institute

On average, people in larger cities are better off economically. But a new study published in the Royal Society Interface builds on previous research that says, that’s not necessarily true for the individual city-dweller. It turns out, bigger cities also produce more income inequality.

Released: 13-Aug-2021 10:20 AM EDT
The Covid-19 pandemic has widened the gap between the rich and the poor, and it's not finished yet
University of Sheffield

New study from University of Sheffield highlights how the pandemic continues to widen the gap between the rich and the poor

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Released: 11-Aug-2021 4:55 PM EDT
17-Year Study of Children Associates Poverty with Smaller, Slower-Growing Subcortical Regions
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from the lab of Deanna Barch and Joan Luby shows a lasting relationship between childhood poverty, brain development.

Released: 2-Aug-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Less Trade-Offs, More Synergies: New Pathway to Mitigate Climate Change and Boost Progress on UN Sustainable Development Goals
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

A world that combats climate change while simultaneously improving on all 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is possible, a new study finds.

Newswise: Public
Released: 28-Jul-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Why Lockdown in Africa Does Not Work as a First COVID-19 Pandemic Response
University of Johannesburg

In an African pandemic it is more productive to consider lockdowns, after using other non-medical measures first, Especially in countries with high levels of poverty and corruption, says Prof Nicholas Ngepah, a Professor of Economics at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa.

Released: 23-Jul-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Americans with Higher Net Worth at Midlife Tend to Live Longer
Northwestern University

One of the keys to a long life may lie in your net worth.

Released: 22-Jul-2021 2:40 PM EDT
New Map Shows Where Millions of UK Residents Struggle to Access Food
University of Sheffield

In one out of every six local authorities, rates of hunger are more than 150 per cent (one and a half times) the national average.

Released: 22-Jul-2021 9:45 AM EDT
Informing Policy for Long-Term Global Food Security
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

The results of a new IIASA-led study can be used to benchmark global food security projections and inform policy analysis and public debate on the future of food.

20-Jul-2021 7:00 PM EDT
City-Funded Housing Repairs in Low-Income Neighborhoods Associated with Drop in Crime
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In Philadelphia, when a home received repairs through a city-funded program, total crime dropped by 21.9% on that block, and as the number of repaired houses on a block increased, instances of crime fell even further, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published today in JAMA Network Open.

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Released: 20-Jul-2021 5:25 PM EDT
A Machine Learning Breakthrough: Using Satellite Images to Improve Human Lives
University of California, Berkeley

More than 700 imaging satellites are orbiting the earth, and every day they beam vast oceans of information -- including data that reflects climate change, health and poverty -- to databases on the ground.

Released: 20-Jul-2021 5:10 PM EDT
Vaccine acceptance higher in developing nations than U.S.
Cornell University

Willingness to get a COVID-19 vaccine was considerably higher in developing countries than in the United States and Russia, according to new research.

Newswise: COVID-19 Shutdowns Reveal Racial Disparities in Exposure to Air Pollution
Released: 20-Jul-2021 3:20 PM EDT
COVID-19 Shutdowns Reveal Racial Disparities in Exposure to Air Pollution
George Washington University

A new GW study of COVID-19 shutdowns in the United States reveals pronounced disparities in air pollution — with disenfranchised, minority neighborhoods still experiencing more exposure to a harmful air pollutant compared to wealthier, white communities.


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