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Article ID: 696269

Researchers Generate Electricity and Hydrogen from Live Bacteria

American Technion Society

Using a family of photosynthetic bacteria that commonly live in lakes and seas, researchers at the Technion have developed a technology to generate electricity and hydrogen energy. The researchers believe their technology can serve as a promising source of clean, environment-friendly energy that will not emit pollutants during production or use (hydrogen fuel).

Released:
18-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696156

New Study Shows Human Activity Creates a More Nocturnal Animal World

Boise State University

Rapid expansion of human activity across the globe is causing wildlife to become more nocturnal, according to a new joint study conducted by researchers at Boise State University and the University of California, Berkley, and published in the journal, Science.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 4:20 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Jun-2018 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 695802

Choice Matters: The Environmental Costs of Producing Meat, Seafood

University of Washington

A new study appearing online June 11 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment considers which food type is more environmentally costly to produce: livestock, farmed seafood or wild-caught fish.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 3:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695788

Hurricanes Are Slowing Down, and That’s Bad News

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Some hurricanes are moving more slowly, spending increased time over land and leading to catastrophic local rainfall and flooding, according to a new study published Wednesday (June 6) in the journal Nature.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695756

Satellite sensors track spring greenup, fall leaf-off

South Dakota State University

Spring came later this year, but high inter-annual variability is not unusual, according to geospatial scientists who been tracking the growing season since 2000 using environmental satellite data.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695285

Core Arboretum Nature Connection Series Begins Early June

West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

West Virginia University’s Core Arboretum will bring local and regional nature experts to campus this summer in its annual Nature Connection Series.

Released:
30-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695186

New Research Finds Tall and Older Amazonian Forests More Resistant to Droughts

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

A new Columbia Engineering study shows that photosynthesis in tall Amazonian forests--forests above 30m--is 3x less sensitive to precipitation variability than in shorter forests of less than 20m. Taller Amazonian forests were also found to be older, have more biomass and deeper rooting systems that enable them to access deeper soil moisture, making them more resilient to drought. The findings suggest that forest height + age are an important regulator of photosynthesis in response to droughts.

Released:
30-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695267

Bees Adjust to Seasons with Nutrients in Flowers and ‘Dirty Water’

Tufts University

Researchers discovered that honey bees alter their diet by the season. A spike in calcium consumption in the fall, and high intake of potassium, help prepare the bees for colder months when they likely need those minerals to generate warmth. Limitations in nutrient availability can have implications for the health of both managed and wild colonies.

Released:
29-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695256

Biology Student Links Clean Air Act to Red Spruce Recovery in Appalachia

West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

A dramatic recovery of red spruce trees in the central Appalachian Mountains led West Virginia University researchers to pursue the driving factors behind improved forest health.

Released:
29-May-2018 3:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695223

New Map Shows Many Old-growth Forests Remain In Europe

University of Vermont

A team of researchers created the first map of Europe’s last wild forests. The map identifies more than 3.4 million acres in 34 European countries, showing that more old growth remains than previously understood.

Released:
29-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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