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Article ID: 698867

When These Flies Want to Sniff Out Food and Mates, They Wing It

Ohio State University

Fruit flies don’t appear to use their tiny, translucent wings for optimal flight, as one might expect. The speedy appendages seem to be doing double duty, helping the insect sniff out food, mates and other important scents, according to new research from The Ohio State University.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698796

For UW Physicists, the 2-D Form of Tungsten Ditelluride Is Full of Surprises

University of Washington

In a paper published online July 23 in Nature, a UW-led research team reports that the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride can undergo "ferroelectric switching" — a first for a exfoliated 2-D material. Ferroelectric materials can have applications in memory storage, capacitors, RFID card technologies and even medical sensors.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698797

Scientists Discover How to Protect Yeast From Damage in Biofuel Production

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Some chemicals used to speed up the breakdown of plants for production of biofuels like ethanol are poison to the yeasts that turn the plant sugars into fuel. Researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and several Department of Energy laboratories have identified two changes to a single gene that can make the yeast tolerate the pretreatment chemicals.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698724

Is fire the new normal in the American West?

University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin–Madison professor Monica Turner and her research team and colleagues explore how the patterns of fire and recovery are changing, particularly as the climate warms and drought becomes more common.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698383

Combining on and off switches, one protein can control flowering in plants

University of Wisconsin-Madison

New research has discovered a previously unknown mechanism for controlling cellular decisions, one which combines an on-and-off switch in a single protein, either promoting or preventing the transition to flowering in plants.

Released:
1-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698078

Leggy Lizards Don’t Survive the Storm

Washington University in St. Louis

Nobody knows exactly what happens at the eye of the storm. But biologists have published a first-of-its-kind look at the physical characteristics of lizards that seem to make the difference between life and death in a hurricane, as reported on July 25 in the journal Nature. Hint: long, strong back legs do not help like you think they might.

Released:
26-Jul-2018 6:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697728

The Scream: What Were Those Colorful, Wavy Clouds in Edvard Munch’s Famous Painting?

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

What inspired the iconic red-and-yellow sky in The Scream, the painting by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch that sold for a record $119.9 million in 2012? Some say it was a volcanic sunset after the 1883 Krakatau eruption. Others think the wavy sky shows a scream from nature. But scientists at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, University of Oxford and University of London suggest that nacreous, or “mother of pearl,” clouds which can be seen in the southern Norway inspired the dramatic scene in the painting. Their study is published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. “What’s screaming is the sky and the person in the painting is putting his or her hands over their ears so they can’t hear the scream,” said Alan Robock, study co-author and distinguished professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers–New Brunswick. “If you read what Munch wrote, the sky was screaming blood and fire.” There are four known versions of The Scream: an 1893 tempera o

Released:
23-Jul-2018 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 664396

Air Quality in National Parks, Humans Impacting Seasonal Cycles, More Diamonds in the Earth, and More in the Environmental Science News Source

Newswise

The latest research on the environment in the Environmental Science News Source

Released:
21-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697600

Study First to Confirm Where Baby White Sharks ‘Hang Out’ in the North Atlantic

Florida Atlantic University

A team of scientists is the first to confirm the movement patterns and seasonal migrations of baby white sharks in the north Atlantic Ocean. They put the New York Bight shark nursery theory to test by deploying satellite and acoustic tags on 10 baby white sharks (less than 1 year old) off Long Island’s coast. Results provide novel insights into the distribution of this vulnerable early stage of life that complements recent work on larger white sharks.

Released:
18-Jul-2018 12:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697416

The Love Lives of Fruit Flies

Harvard Medical School

New study reveals that a male fruit fly’s decision to court or ignore a female stems from the convergence of motivation, perception and chance that affects the balance of excitatory versus inhibitory signals in the brain to influence decision making. Findings may yield insights about addiction disorders, depression.

Released:
13-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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