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Newswise: Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs

Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs

Washington University in St. Louis

Artificial light at night negatively impacts thousands of species: beetles, moths, wasps and other insects that have evolved to use light levels as cues for courtship, foraging and navigation. Writing in Biological Conservation, Brett Seymoure, the Grossman Family Postdoctoral Fellow of the Living Earth Collaborative at Washington University in St.

Channels: Agriculture, All Journal News, Food and Water Safety, Nature, Wildlife, Pollution,

Released:
18-Nov-2019 2:35 PM EST
Embargo will expire:
20-Nov-2019 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
13-Nov-2019 2:05 PM EST

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Research Results
Newswise: Uncover Secrets of Nesting Birds With “Nest Quest Go!”

Uncover Secrets of Nesting Birds With “Nest Quest Go!”

Cornell University

Secrets hidden in more than 300,000 index cards with hand-written information about nesting birds are gradually being revealed. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is partnering with Zooniverse, an online people-powered research tool, to digitize this valuable collection and create the largest database of nesting bird information in the U.S. This new effort is called "Nest Quest Go!"

Channels: Birds, Environmental Science, Nature,

Released:
13-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: New fossil pushes back physical evidence of insect pollination to 99 million years ago
  • Embargo expired:
    11-Nov-2019 3:00 PM EST

New fossil pushes back physical evidence of insect pollination to 99 million years ago

Indiana University

A study co-led by researchers at Indiana University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has pushed back the first-known physical evidence of insect flower pollination to 99 million years ago, during the mid-Cretaceous period.

Channels: All Journal News, Geology, History, Nature, Paleontology, Plants,

Released:
11-Nov-2019 1:20 PM EST
Feature
Newswise: UCI-led study reveals non-image light sensing mechanism of circadian neurons in fruit flies

UCI-led study reveals non-image light sensing mechanism of circadian neurons in fruit flies

University of California, Irvine

University of California, Irvine researchers reveal how an ancient flavoprotein response to ultra violet (UV), blue and red light informs internal circadian processes about the time of day.

Channels: All Journal News, Environmental Science, Nature, Neuro,

Released:
7-Nov-2019 2:35 PM EST
Research Alert
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2019 1:00 PM EST

Quantitative Biology Opens Trail to Ecological Exploration, Evolutionary Prediction

University of California San Diego

New papers published in Nature uncover surprising new findings on bacterial chemotaxis—the movement of bacterial cells in response to chemical stimuli. The results open the door to a more comprehensive understanding of fundamental questions of ecological exploration and evolutionary prediction.

Channels: All Journal News, Cell Biology, Microbiome, Nature, Nature (journal),

Released:
5-Nov-2019 3:15 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Pharmacy in the Jungle Study Reveals Indigenous People’s Choice of Medicinal Plants

Pharmacy in the Jungle Study Reveals Indigenous People’s Choice of Medicinal Plants

Florida Atlantic University

In one of the most diverse studies of the non-random medicinal plants selection by gender, age and exposure to outside influences from working with ecotourism projects, researchers worked with the Kichwa communities of Chichico Rumi and Kamak Maki in the Ecuadorian Amazon. They discovered a novel method to uncover the intracultural heterogeneity of traditional knowledge while testing the non-random selection of medicinal plants and exploring overuse and underuse of medicinal plant families in these communities.

Channels: All Journal News, Alternative Medicine, Complementary Medicine, Nature, Plants, South America News,

Released:
6-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST
Research Results

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