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Rising from the ashes: volunteers and good science will be vital to bush recovery after catastrophic fires

University of South Australia

University of South Australia ecologist Joan Gibbs describes the day that fires tore through her property in the Adelaide Hills, leaving a trail of devastation. One month on, there are signs of recovery.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, Nature, Plants, Wildfires,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST

Sleet? Freezing rain? Polar vortex? Veteran meteorology expert can explain winter weather forecast terms

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Paul Roebber is one of the leading forecasting experts in the United States and the world. He’s a leader in bringing new approaches to meteorology, and his research has changed how experts around the world forecast weather.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, Meteorology, Nature,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 8:20 AM EST
Feature

Researcher looking for clues in the mystery of the Grand Canyon’s water supply

Northern Arizona University

Research technician Natalie Jones is the lead author on a paper that looked at how scientists model the vulnerability of karst formations around the Grand Canyon. Along with professor Abe Springer, she created a new model that can give land and water managers more information so they can better protect the water system.

Channels: All Journal News, Environmental Science, Food and Water Safety, Geology, Nature,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 4:35 PM EST
Feature Expert
Newswise: 222393_web.jpg

Plane travel destroys polar bear habitat

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

We all know we should fly less as a way to reduce our individual and collective effect on the global climate. But transforming that vague understanding into concrete reasons for action can be difficult -- until now.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Nature, Travel and Transportation,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 3:10 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: For now, river deltas gain land worldwide

For now, river deltas gain land worldwide

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Researchers from Utrecht University in the Netherlands, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), and colleagues found that delta areas worldwide have actually gained land in the past 30 years, despite river damming. However, recent land gains are unlikely to last throughout the 21st century due to expected, accelerated sea level rise. The researchers published their findings in the journal Nature.

Channels: Environmental Science, Geology, Nature, All Journal News, Nature (journal),

Released:
23-Jan-2020 10:25 AM EST
Research Results

Report reveals ‘unseen’ human benefits from ocean twilight zone

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new report from researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals for the first time the unseen—and somewhat surprising—benefits that people receive from the ocean’s twilight zone. Also known as the “mesopelagic,” this is the ocean layer just beyond the sunlit surface.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Nature,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 3:30 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Global river deltas increasingly shaped by humans, study says

Global river deltas increasingly shaped by humans, study says

Tulane University

The study by current and former researchers at Tulane University looked at nearly every delta in the world.

Channels: Environmental Science, Geology, Nature, Nature (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 3:15 PM EST
Feature

Walking sharks discovered in the tropics

University of Queensland

Four new species of tropical sharks that use their fins to walk are causing a stir in waters off northern Australia and New Guinea.

Channels: Environmental Science, Marine Science, Nature, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 1:40 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: 222174_web.jpg

Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events

University of Nevada, Reno

Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity and density that are paralleled by losses in an important ecosystem service: biocontrol of herbivores by parasitoids.

Channels: Agriculture, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Nature, Plants, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 1:20 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Most Rehabilitating Sea Turtles with Infectious Tumors Don’t Survive

Most Rehabilitating Sea Turtles with Infectious Tumors Don’t Survive

Florida Atlantic University

Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. FB leads to tumors on the turtles’ eyes, flippers and internal organs and is widespread in warmer climates like Florida. A large-scale study evaluated tumor score, removal and regrowth in rehabilitating green sea turtles with FP in the southeastern U.S. from 2009 to 2017, and found that 75 percent did not survive following admission into a rehabilitation facility, irrespective of whether or not tumor regrowth occurred after surgery.

Channels: All Journal News, Infectious Diseases, Marine Science, Nature, Veterinary Medicine, Wildlife,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 11:30 AM EST
Research Results


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