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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Dec-2018 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 705162

Shape-Shifting Origami Could Help Antenna Systems Adapt On The Fly

Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have devised a method for using an origami-based structure to create radio frequency filters that have adjustable dimensions, enabling the devices to change which signals they block throughout a large range of frequencies.

Released:
10-Dec-2018 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 704771

National Rheumatology and Psoriasis Organizations Release Joint Guideline for Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) have released a joint treatment guideline for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) that provides evidence-based pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic recommendations on caring for treatment-naïve patients with active PsA and patients who continue to have active PsA despite treatment.

Released:
3-Dec-2018 12:30 PM EST
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Article ID: 704747

Kennesaw State associate professor of exercise science conducts extensive CrossFit injury study

Kennesaw State University

The popular fitness program CrossFit is a safe training method for most people but could result in injuries for those who are new to it or don’t participate often, according to a four-year analysis conducted by Kennesaw State University associate professor of exercise science Yuri Feito.

Released:
1-Dec-2018 6:05 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 704653

Group Acquires Patent for Retrofit Blind Spot Detection System

Kennesaw State University

A team of Kennesaw State University alumni are aiming to make roadways safer after inventing a blind spot detection system that can be retrofitted to older vehicles.

Released:
29-Nov-2018 4:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 704611

Growing Pile of Human and Animal Waste Harbors Threats, Opportunities

Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are highlighting another effect from animals raised for food and the humans who eat them: the waste they all leave behind.

Released:
29-Nov-2018 10:05 AM EST

Article ID: 704548

Swapping Bacteria May Help ‘Nemo’ Fish Cohabitate with Fish-Killing Anemones

Georgia Institute of Technology

The fish killer and the fish live in harmony: But how the clownfish thrive in the poisonous tentacles of the anemone remains a mystery. A new study tackles the iconic conundrum from the microbial side.

Released:
28-Nov-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 704449

Solving a 75-Year-Old Mystery Might Provide a New Source of Farm Fertilizer

Georgia Institute of Technology

The solution to a 75-year-old materials mystery might one day allow farmers in developing nations to produce their own fertilizer on demand, using sunlight and nitrogen from the air.

Released:
27-Nov-2018 9:45 AM EST
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Article ID: 704445

Research on bats funded by National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

Kennesaw State University

Kennesaw State microbiologist Chris Cornelison is among a collaborative team of researchers awarded a $365,000 grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to combat white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease causing the rapid decline of tricolored bats in Texas.

Released:
27-Nov-2018 9:35 AM EST

Article ID: 704272

Complimentary Press Registration Available for 2019 Winter Rheumatology Symposium

American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) welcomes members of the press to write about rheumatology research presented the Winter Rheumatology Symposium in Snowmass Village, CO on January 26 to February 1, 2019.

Released:
21-Nov-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704091

Cotton-Based Hybrid Biofuel Cell Could Power Implantable Medical Devices

Georgia Institute of Technology

A glucose-powered biofuel cell that uses electrodes made from cotton fiber could someday help power implantable medical devices such as pacemakers and sensors. The new fuel cell, which provides twice as much power as conventional biofuel cells, could be paired with batteries or supercapacitors to provide a hybrid power source for the medical devices.

Released:
15-Nov-2018 1:05 PM EST

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