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Released: 14-Sep-2020 12:50 PM EDT
UCI is ranked among nation’s top 10 public universities for sixth year in a row
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 14, 2020 — The University of California, Irvine has been ranked eighth among the nation’s public universities in U.S. News & World Report’s 2021 list of “Best Colleges,” released today. This is the sixth consecutive year in which UCI has placed in the top 10. UCI placed 35th among all American universities – public and private – and rose to second in the subcategory of social mobility, which takes into account the graduation rate of students awarded Pell Grants.

Newswise: Digging into soil organic matter
Released: 14-Sep-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Digging into soil organic matter
Iowa State University

A new study found patterns in how soil organic matter forms across a wide range of climate types. Understanding how soils break down or preserve organic matter is important because organic matter plays a central role in the kind of services soils can provide, such as whether they make good agricultural soils or if they can sequester carbon to slow climate change.

Newswise: Wistar Appoints Ami Patel as Caspar Wistar Fellow
Released: 14-Sep-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Wistar Appoints Ami Patel as Caspar Wistar Fellow
Wistar Institute

The Wistar Institute announces the appointment of Ami Patel, Ph.D., as a Caspar Wistar Fellow in the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center.

Newswise: Immune system affects mind and body, study indicates
Released: 14-Sep-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Immune system affects mind and body, study indicates
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that a molecule produced by the immune system acts on the brain to change the behavior of mice.

Released: 14-Sep-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Doctors Get Plenty of Advice on Starting Treatment. This Could Help Them Know When to Stop.
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Decades of effort have improved the chances that patients will get the scans, routine tests and medicines that can do them the most good – and avoid the ones that won’t help them at all. But in the push toward evidence-based medicine, a new study says, a key step has mostly gotten overlooked: helping doctors stop or scale back – or deintensify – treatment once it has started.

Released: 14-Sep-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Neural Cartography
Harvard Medical School

Researchers have demonstrated that a new x-ray microscopy technique could help accelerate efforts to map neural circuits and ultimately the brain itself.

Newswise: Real-time estimates show poverty rose after government benefits expired
Released: 14-Sep-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Real-time estimates show poverty rose after government benefits expired
University of Notre Dame

Research from Notre Dame shows poverty rose a full percentage point from 9.4 percent in the period from April to June to 10.4 percent for July and August.

Released: 14-Sep-2020 11:40 AM EDT
UCLA joins nationwide clinical trial to study course of COVID-19 in people with cancer
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

To help better understand the impact and outcomes of COVID-19 in people undergoing cancer treatment, UCLA are participating in a NCI study with cancer centers across the country.

Newswise: Michigan Tech expert available: Mega wildfires release soil carbon into the atmosphere
Released: 14-Sep-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Michigan Tech expert available: Mega wildfires release soil carbon into the atmosphere
Michigan Technological University

Evan Kane, soil carbon expert, is available to speak about how increasingly severe wildfires are accelerating the climate change feedback loop.

14-Sep-2020 8:55 AM EDT
ARPA-Type Funding Gives Green Technology an ‘Innovation Advantage’, Study Finds
University of Cambridge

• Startups funded by US energy agency ARPA-E file patents at twice the rate of similar cleantech firms, according to latest research. • UK should trial its own climate-focused ARPA as part of Covid-19 recovery package, argues Cambridge researcher. • Learn lessons from US by supporting startups through “valley of death” to boost productivity and innovation in green tech.

Newswise: Twist on CRISPR Gene Editing Treats Adult-Onset Muscular Dystrophy in Mice
11-Sep-2020 3:20 PM EDT
Twist on CRISPR Gene Editing Treats Adult-Onset Muscular Dystrophy in Mice
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers demonstrate that one dose of their version of CRISR gene editing can chew up toxic RNA and almost completely reverse symptoms in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy, a type of adult-onset muscular dystrophy.

11-Sep-2020 8:10 AM EDT
Climate change triggers migration
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

According to a new study, environmental hazards affect populations worldwide and can drive migration under specific conditions, especially in middle-income and agricultural countries.

Newswise: UC San Diego Health Continues Regional Growth with New Clinic in Carmel Valley
Released: 14-Sep-2020 10:50 AM EDT
UC San Diego Health Continues Regional Growth with New Clinic in Carmel Valley
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego Health continues to expand health care services by opening a new clinic located at 6030 Village Way in Pacific Highlands Ranch. The clinic offers primary care and women’s health services.

Newswise: First fiber-optic nanotip electron gun enables easier nanoscale research
Released: 14-Sep-2020 10:25 AM EDT
First fiber-optic nanotip electron gun enables easier nanoscale research
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Nebraska have developed an easier way to generate electrons for nanoscale imaging and sensing, providing a useful new tool for material science, bioimaging and fundamental quantum research.

Released: 14-Sep-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Rheumatology Leaders and Patient Advocates Urge Congress to Address Care Challenges Exacerbated by COVID-19 During Advocates for Arthritis
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will hold its first virtual Advocates for Arthritis event on Tuesday, Sept. 15, where more than 120 rheumatologists, rheumatology health professionals, and patient advocates will meet with lawmakers via video to discuss the healthcare challenges they are facing in the midst of COVID-19.

Newswise: DNA webs may drive lung pathology in severe COVID-19
Released: 14-Sep-2020 10:10 AM EDT
DNA webs may drive lung pathology in severe COVID-19
The Rockefeller University Press

Sticky webs of DNA released from immune cells known as neutrophils may cause much of the tissue damage associated with severe COVID-19 infections, according to two new studies published September 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM). The research, conducted by independent groups in Belgium and Brazil, suggests that blocking the release of these DNA webs could be a new therapeutic target for the management of severe forms of COVID-19.

Newswise: UIC continues climb in US News & World Report rankings
Released: 14-Sep-2020 10:05 AM EDT
UIC continues climb in US News & World Report rankings
University of Illinois at Chicago

UIC climbed by eight spots this year to rank 52nd among public national universities.

Newswise: National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership names Bethany Hamilton as new Director
Released: 14-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership names Bethany Hamilton as new Director
George Washington University

The National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership (NCMLP) at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH) is thrilled to announce the selection of Bethany Hamilton as its new Director.

Released: 14-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
As Domestic Violence Spikes, Many Victims and Their Children Have Nowhere to Live
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

COVID-19 has left many victims of domestic violence facing difficulties feeding their children and accessing services for safe housing, transportation and childcare once they leave shelters, according to a Rutgers study published in the journal Violence Against Women.

11-Sep-2020 4:55 PM EDT
New study from MD Anderson and BridgeBio’s Navire Pharma shows SHP2 inhibition overcomes multiple therapeutic-resistance mechanisms in lung cancer
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

New preclinical research from MD Anderson and Navire finds a novel drug targeting SHP2 can overcome multiple paths of therapeutic resistance in lung cancer. Navire will launch a clinical trial of SHP2 inhibitors by the end of 2020.

Newswise: Cigarette smoking associated with worse outcomes for bladder cancer patients after surgery
Released: 14-Sep-2020 9:05 AM EDT
Cigarette smoking associated with worse outcomes for bladder cancer patients after surgery
Keck Medicine of USC

Study from Keck Medicine of USC links smoking with a higher risk of death and cancer recurrence, and less responsiveness to chemotherapy

Newswise: New Pediatric Heart Failure and Transplant Program Launches at Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone
Released: 14-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
New Pediatric Heart Failure and Transplant Program Launches at Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone
NYU Langone Health

NYU Langone Transplant Institute and Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital launch a new Pediatric Heart Failure and Transplant Program, expanding regional access to specialized care for children with complex cardiac needs

Newswise: You can train your brain to reduce motion sickness
Released: 14-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
You can train your brain to reduce motion sickness
University of Warwick

Everyone can suffer from motion sickness, and around one in three are known to be highly susceptible to motion sickness

Released: 14-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Early Steroids Improve Outcomes in Patients with Septic Shock
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Some critically ill patients with septic shock need medications called vasopressors to correct dangerously low blood pressure. When high doses of vasopressors are needed or blood pressure isn’t responding well, the steroid hydrocortisone is often used. In this situation, earlier treatment with hydrocortisone reduces the risk of death and other adverse outcomes, reports a study in SHOCK®: Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis: Laboratory and Clinical Approaches, Official Journal of the Shock Society. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: ChopChop Family partners with The Kids Cook Monday and UF/IFAS to offer webinar series
Released: 14-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
ChopChop Family partners with The Kids Cook Monday and UF/IFAS to offer webinar series
Monday Campaigns

ChopChop Family, The Kids Cook Monday, and University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are partnering to produce a series of free webinars, through the Community of Practice Healthy Food Choices in Schools eXtension, for educators to help support families in making healthful and cost-effective food choices.

Newswise: Some but not all U.S. metro areas could grow all needed food locally, estimates study
9-Sep-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Some but not all U.S. metro areas could grow all needed food locally, estimates study
Tufts University

How local could food be in the U.S.? A modeling study estimates the distance within which metro centers could meet food needs if they tried to feed themselves locally. Some—but not all—could rely on nearby agricultural land, and dietary changes would increase local potential, according to the study.

Newswise: Helping Future-Proof the Wine Sector
Released: 14-Sep-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Helping Future-Proof the Wine Sector
University of Adelaide

Winegrape growers around the world will be better able to navigate future global markets and the impacts of climate change with a new book available free online. Which Winegrape Varieties are Grown Where? A Global Empirical Picture provides snapshots from 1990 to 2016 of the world’s vineyard bearing areas of more than 1700 prime grape varieties in over 700 wine regions.

Newswise: Georgetown Global Health Center Issues Pandemic Preparedness Report and COVID-19 Lessons
Released: 14-Sep-2020 8:35 AM EDT
Georgetown Global Health Center Issues Pandemic Preparedness Report and COVID-19 Lessons
Georgetown University Medical Center

In a new report commissioned by the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB), Georgetown global health experts say the success of any effort to redress pandemic preparedness failures demonstrated by COVID-19 requires a re-centering of governance that would include greater accountability, transparency, equity, participation and the rule of law.

Newswise: High-risk Patients for Colorectal Cancer Lack Knowledge About Colonoscopy
Released: 14-Sep-2020 8:30 AM EDT
High-risk Patients for Colorectal Cancer Lack Knowledge About Colonoscopy
Florida Atlantic University

Many clinicians rely on self-reports from their high-risk patients about their need and proper interval for repeat surveillance colonoscopy. Researchers analyzed data over four years to explore the knowledge of these high-risk patients. Twenty-eight percent were unaware of either the need for a repeat colonoscopy or the proper surveillance interval. Of these, 16.6 percent were unaware of the proper three-year interval to obtain a follow-up surveillance colonoscopy. Also, 12 percent were not even aware that they required a follow-up surveillance colonoscopy.

Newswise:  57% of Parents Say Students Aren’t Getting Enough Sleep
Released: 14-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
57% of Parents Say Students Aren’t Getting Enough Sleep
American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

n a new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), more than half of parents said they have a child or teenager who does not get enough sleep. To highlight the importance of healthy sleep, the AASM is conducting the first-ever Student Sleep Health Week, Sept. 14-20, 2020.

Newswise: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to Begin Constructing New Patient Housing Facility
14-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to Begin Constructing New Patient Housing Facility
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital will begin constructing The Domino’s Village, a new housing facility for patients and their families, this fall at 361 N. Third Street in Memphis, Tennessee.

Newswise: Loneliness doubled among older adults in first months of COVID-19, poll shows
10-Sep-2020 7:05 AM EDT
Loneliness doubled among older adults in first months of COVID-19, poll shows
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Staying close to home can help older adults reduce their risk of COVID-19. But a new national poll suggests it comes with a cost. In June of this year, 56% of people over the age of 50 said they sometimes or often felt isolated from others – more than double the 27% who felt that way in a similar poll in 2018.

Newswise: UC Campuses Pilot Google-Apple Notification Technology to Help Prevent COVID-19 Outbreaks
Released: 11-Sep-2020 8:05 PM EDT
UC Campuses Pilot Google-Apple Notification Technology to Help Prevent COVID-19 Outbreaks
University of California San Diego Health

Today, California approved a new voluntary pilot program that uses Apple and Google smartphone technology to help rapidly control COVID-19 outbreaks. The program will launch on the campus of UC San Diego for any students and employees who opt in.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 7:05 PM EDT
Imaging agent developed at Washington University spotlights inflammation
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a new PET imaging agent that detects signs of inflammation. Such a tracer could aid diagnosis and study of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer to COVID-19.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 6:15 PM EDT
Welcome Letter from ACTRIMS President on MSVirtual2020
Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS)

It is with great pleasure that I welcome you to the 8th joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS conference. This conference, MSVirtual2020, is the largest conference dedicated to multiple sclerosis (MS) research and our first virtual conference.

Newswise: 242690_web.jpg
Released: 11-Sep-2020 5:40 PM EDT
Netflix - a zebra among horses: QUT researcher
Queensland University of Technology

Media studies expert Professor Amanda Lotz, from QUT’s Digital Media Research Centre, said there is a lot of misunderstanding about the world’s biggest internet-distributed video service.

Newswise: 242530_web.jpg
Released: 11-Sep-2020 5:15 PM EDT
New tracking technology will help fight rhino poaching in Namibia
Duke University

Interactive software that "reads" and analyzes footprints left by black rhinoceroses can be used to monitor the movements of the animals in the wild, giving conservationists a new way to keep watch on the endangered species and help keep it safe from poachers, according to a Duke University-led study.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 5:10 PM EDT
Hoarding and herding during the COVID-19 pandemic
University of Technology, Sydney

Rushing to stock up on toilet paper before it vanished from the supermarket isle, stashing cash under the mattress, purchasing a puppy or perhaps planting a vegetable patch - the COVID-19 pandemic has triggered some interesting and unusual changes in our behavior.

Newswise: High-Performance Computing Helps Grid Operators Manage Increasing Complexity
Released: 11-Sep-2020 5:00 PM EDT
High-Performance Computing Helps Grid Operators Manage Increasing Complexity
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL, in partnership with industry, has developed a computational tool called HIPPO, which accelerates the increasingly complex calculations grid operators must make in scheduling energy resources to meet the next day’s forecasted electricity demand.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Ingalls Memorial Behavioral Health Services Expand to Calumet City
University of Chicago Medical Center

UChicago Medicine Ingalls Memorial Hospital will expand its behavioral health services to Calumet City, Illinois in September 2020, providing essential outpatient mental healthcare to Southland residents.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 4:45 PM EDT
Perception matters: Consumers prefer "natural" prevention options
Washington University in St. Louis

New research shows consumers strongly prefer "natural," not synthetic, products to prevent ailments. That presents a dilemma. Medical researchers are racing to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. When they do, how receptive will consumers be?

Released: 11-Sep-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Rigged election? Partisans view threats to election integrity differently
Washington University in St. Louis

Even before they cast their votes, partisans of different stripes are poised to question the legitimacy of the election outcome, but for different reasons. According to The American Social Survey, sponsored by the Weidenbaum Center at Washington University in St. Louis, nine out of 10 Trump supporters are very or somewhat concerned about fraud in mail-in voting.

Newswise: Novel Discovery Challenges a Current Kidney Cancer Paradigm
Released: 11-Sep-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Novel Discovery Challenges a Current Kidney Cancer Paradigm
Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

Newly published research has reversed our understanding of an aspect of kidney tumor growth. Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah discovered that two key proteins have opposite roles than what was previously believed.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Jupiter's moons could be warming each other
University of Arizona

Jupiter's moons are hot. Well, hotter than they should be, for being so far from the sun.


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