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Instant-Start Computers Possible with New Breakthrough

If data could be encoded without current, it would require much less energy and make things like low-power, instant-on computing a ubiquitous reality. A team at Cornell University has made a breakthrough in that direction with a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device. Equivalent to one computer bit, it exhibits the holy grail of next-generation nonvolatile memory: magnetic switchability, in two steps, with nothing but an electric field. Their results were published online Dec. 17 in Nature.

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Getting Bot Responders Into Shape

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Sandia National Laboratories is tackling one of the biggest barriers to the use of robots in emergency response: energy efficiency. Through a project supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Sandia is developing technology that will dramatically improve the endurance of legged robots, helping them operate for long periods while performing the types of locomotion most relevant to disaster response scenarios.

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Professor’s Weather Nowcasting Company Advances in Launchpad Competition

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NextStorm Inc., a University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) professor’s startup weather nowcasting company, has advanced to the second round of Alabama Launchpad startup business competition.

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Startup Seamless Devices Launches from Prof. Peter Kinget’s Lab

Innovative technology developed in Electrical Engineering Professor Peter Kinget’s lab is at the core of Seamless Devices, a startup co-founded by Kinget and his former student Jayanth Kuppambatti PhD’14. Seamless Devices aims to address critical limitations faced by semiconductor technologies striving to meet the demands of performance and power efficiency required by the next-generation of electronic devices and sensors.

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Medicine

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UCLA Researcher Advances Robotic Surgery Technique to Treat Previously Inoperable Head and Neck Cancer Tumors

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In a groundbreaking new study, UCLA researchers have for the first time advanced a surgical technique performed with the help of a robot to successfully access a previously-unreachable area of the head and neck.

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Medicine

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Technology Breakthrough Reveals Cellular Transcription Process

“This new research tool offers us a more profound view of the immune responses that are involved in a range of diseases, such as HIV infection. At the level of gene transcription, this had been difficult, complex and costly to do with current technologies, such as microscopy” - Dr. Daniel Kaufmann, University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre

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Smaller Lidars Could Allow UAVs to Conduct Underwater Scans

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A research team has designed a new approach that could lead to underwater imaging lidars that are much smaller and more efficient than the current full-size systems. The new technology would allow modest-sized unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) carry bathymetric lidars, lowering costs substantially.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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New Study Shows Computer-Based Approach to Treating Anxiety May Reduce Suicide Risk

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A group of psychology researchers at Florida State University have developed a simple computer-based approach to treating anxiety sensitivity, something that could have major implications for veterans and other groups who are considered at risk for suicide.

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You’re Not Paying Attention!

A study focuses on the fact that the average American receives more than 15 hours a day of digital media, the public's attention span for media and the ways the media is keeping us engaged.

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World’s Fastest 2-D Camera May Enable New Scientific Discoveries

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A team of biomedical engineers at Washington University in St. Louis, led by Lihong Wang, PhD, has developed the world’s fastest receive-only 2-D camera, a device that can capture events up to 100 billion frames per second.

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