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Are You a Nomophobe?

Iowa State University researchers have developed a questionnaire to help you determine if you suffer from nomophobia or a fear of being without your mobile phone.

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Researcher Employing New Technology to Study Public Health Data

Faculty in UNC Charlotte College of Health and Human Services have published a paper in the American Journal of Preventative medicine that outlines a novel approach to studying public health data.

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Transforming Behavioral Therapy with Technology

Using computer vision, signal processing and privacy protection, University of Kentucky doctoral student Nkiruka Uzuegbunam, along with electrical and computer engineering Associate Professor Sen-ching Samson Cheung, have developed "MEBook," a combination of a social narrative and gaming system that psychologists and parents can use as behavioral therapies for autistic children.

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‘Diamonds From the Sky’ Approach Turns CO₂ Into Valuable Products

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Finding a technology to shift carbon dioxide (CO2), the most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gas, from a climate change problem to a valuable commodity has long been a dream. Now, a team of chemists says they have developed a technology to economically convert atmospheric CO2 directly into highly valued carbon nanofibers for industrial and consumer products. They will present the research at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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New Technology Can Expand LED Lighting, Cutting Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

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Highly efficient, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) could slash the world’s electricity consumption. They are already sold in stores, but are expensive, and many of them give off “harsh” light. But researchers will report today that they have developed a less expensive, more sustainable white LED with a warm glow. The scientists will discuss their research at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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Solar Cell Efficiency Could Double with Novel ‘Green’ Antenna

The use of solar energy in the U.S. is growing, but panels on rooftops are still a rare sight. They cost thousands of dollars, and homeowners don’t recoup costs for years. But scientists may have a solution. At the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, they report the development of a unique, “green” antenna that could potentially double efficiencies of certain solar cells and make them more affordable.

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Scientists Discover Atomic-Resolution Details of Brain Signaling

Scientists have revealed never-before-seen details of how our brain sends rapid-fire messages between its cells. They mapped the 3-D atomic structure of a two-part protein complex that controls the release of signaling chemicals, called neurotransmitters, from brain cells. Understanding how cells release those signals in less than one-thousandth of a second could help launch a new wave of research on drugs for treating brain disorders.

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How to Preserve Fleeting Digital Information with DNA for Future Generations

Hand-written letters and old photos seem quaint in today’s digital age. But there’s one thing traditional media have over hard drives: longevity. Scientists are turning to nature’s master of information storage to save data. One team demonstrated that synthetic DNA can last 2,000 years, and they’re now working to index the system to make it easier to navigate. They present their work today at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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New Method Could Detect Blood Clots Anywhere in the Body with a Single Scan

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A blood clot can potentially trigger heart attacks, strokes and other medical emergencies. Treatment requires finding its exact location, but current techniques can only look at one part of the body at once. Now, researchers are reporting a method, tested in rats, that may someday allow physicians to quickly scan the entire body for a blood clot. The team will describe their approach at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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A Thin Ribbon of Flexible Electronics Can Monitor Health, Infrastructure

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A new world of flexible, bendable, even stretchable electronics is emerging from research labs to address a wide range of potentially game-changing uses. Over the last few years, one team of chemists and materials scientists has begun exploring military applications in harsh environments for aircraft, explosive devices and even combatants themselves. They will present their research at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.