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Study Shows Role of Media in Sharing Life Events

To share is human. And the means to share personal news — good and bad — have exploded over the last decade, particularly social media and texting. But until now, all research about what is known as “social sharing,” or the act of telling others about the important events in our lives, has been restricted to face-to-face interactions.

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We, Robot: AU Prof. Despina Kakoudaki Available for Comment

Robots and androids hold a powerful sway on our cultural imagination. Countless science fiction books and films have depicted artificial intelligence. Why do we find artificial people fascinating?

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A New Multi-Bit 'Spin' for MRAM Storage

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Interest in magnetic random access memory (MRAM) is escalating, thanks to demand for fast, low-cost, nonvolatile, low-consumption, secure memory devices. MRAM boasts all of these advantages as an emerging technology, but so far it hasn't been able to match flash memory in terms of storage density. In Applied Physics Letters, a France-U.S. research team reports an intriguing new multi-bit MRAM storage paradigm with the potential to rival flash memory.

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Ultrafast X-Ray Laser Sheds New Light on Fundamental Ultrafast Dynamics

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Physics researchersstudied how an electron moves between different atoms in an exploding molecule.

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The Connection Between Human Translation and Computerized Translation Programs

A new study that was conducted by the Department of Computer Science at the University of Haifa suggests a number of new discoveries relating to the unique linguistic features of text that has been translated by a person that can significantly improve the capabilities of computerized translation programs

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Your Next Angry Birds Opponent Could Be a Robot

With the help of a smart tablet and Angry Birds, children can now do something typically reserved for engineers and computer scientists: program a robot to learn new skills. The Georgia Institute of Technology project is designed to serve as a rehabilitation tool and to help kids with disabilities.

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Agile Aperture Antenna Tested on Aircraft to Survey Ground Emitters, Maintain Satellite Connection

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The Georgia Tech Research Institute’s software-defined, electronically-reconfigurable Agile Aperture Antenna (A3) has now been tested on the land, sea and air.

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Making Quantum Connections

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Physicists are pretty adept at controlling quantum systems and even making certain entangled states. JQI researchers are putting these skills to work to explore the dynamics of correlated quantum systems. Their recent results investigating how information flows through a quantum many-body system are published this week in the journal Nature (10.1038/nature13450), and in a second paper to appear in Physical Review Letters.

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New Chocolate-Flavored Soft Chews Good for Your Teeth

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A dream come “chew” for your teeth? Researchers at Stony Brook University School of Dental Medicine and Ortek Therapeutics, Inc., have developed a chocolate-flavored soft chew that is actually beneficial for your teeth. BasicBites™ is a sugar-free chewy that helps maintain healthy teeth by supporting the normal acid-base (pH) levels that exist on tooth surfaces while coating the teeth with a mineral source.

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Better Visualizing of Fitness-App Data Helps Discover Trends, Reach Goals

University of Washington researchers have developed visual tools to help self-trackers understand their daily activity patterns over a longer period and in more detail. They found people had an easier time meeting personal fitness and activity goals when they could see their data presented in a broader, more visual way.

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