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Information Storage for the Next Generation of Plastic Computers

Inexpensive computers, cell phones and other systems that substitute flexible plastic for silicon chips may be one step closer to reality, thanks to research published on April 16 in the journal Nature Communications.

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Sloan Foundation Grant Helps Globus Democratize Data Science

A $500,000 grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation will help Globus deliver on its mission to accelerate discovery by making advanced research data management infrastructure available to small laboratories and individual researchers around the world.

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Computer Software Accurately Predicts Student Test Performance

The University of California, San Diego and Emotient, the leading provider of facial expression recognition data and analysis, announced publication of a joint study by two Emotient co-founders affiliated with UC San Diego, together with researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University and Virginia State University.

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UW Graduate's Lens Turns Any Smartphone Into a Portable Microscope

The Micro Phone Lens, developed by UW mechanical engineering alumnus Thomas Larson ('13), can turn any smartphone or tablet computer into a hand-held microscope. The soft, pliable lens sticks to a device's camera without any adhesive or glue and makes it possible to see things magnified dozens of times on the screen.

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Device Turns Flat Surface into Spherical Antenna

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By depositing an array of tiny, metallic, U-shaped structures onto a dielectric material, a team of researchers in China has created a new artificial surface that can bend and focus electromagnetic waves the same way an antenna does.

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New Technique Takes Cues from Astronomy and Ophthalmology to Sharpen Microscope Images

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The complexity of biology can befuddle even the most sophisticated light microscopes. Biological samples bend light in unpredictable ways, returning difficult-to-interpret information to the microscope and distorting the resulting image. New imaging technology developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus rapidly corrects for these distortions and sharpens high-resolution images over large volumes of tissue. The approach, a form of adaptive optics, works in tissues that do not scatter light, making it well suited to imaging the transparent bodies of zebrafish and the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, important model organisms in biological research. Janelia group leader Eric Betzig says his team developed the new technology by combining adaptive optics strategies that astronomers and ophthalmologists use to cancel out similar distortions in their images.

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Bio-Engineered Vaginas, How Do They Work? UPDATE: Watch Pre-Recorded Q&A

Newswise hosts the first live, interactive virtual event for major research finding for journalists. Newswise and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center are collaborating to offer direct access to the investigator via Newswise Live, an interactive virtual event.

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Researchers Bolster Development of Programmable Quantum Computers

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University of Chicago researchers and their colleagues at University College London have performed a proof-of-concept experiment that will aid the future development of programmable quantum computers.

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See What a Child Will Look Like Using Automated Age-Progression Software

University of Washington researchers have developed software that automatically generates images of a young child's face as it ages through a lifetime. The technique is the first fully automated approach for aging babies to adults that works with variable lighting, expressions and poses.

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Scientists in Singapore Develop Novel Ultra-Fast Electrical Circuits Using Light-Generated Tunneling Currents

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Assistant Professor Christian A. Nijhuis of the Department of Chemistry at the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Faculty of Science, in collaboration with researchers from the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), namely Dr Bai Ping of the Institute of High Performance Computing and Dr Michel Bosman of the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, has successfully designed and fabricated electrical circuits that can operate at hundreds of terahertz frequencies, which is tens of thousands times faster than today’s state-of-the-art microprocessors.

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