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The Business-Minded Veterinarian

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The interaction between animals and humans secures the continuous demand for practicing veterinarians, and the fewer veterinarians we have, the larger potential for catastrophic disease. But, newly practicing veterinarians are facing financial struggles today, due to high student loan debt and low starting salaries. Additionally, experts say some rural areas are in need of veterinarians but do not have enough animals to financially support a full-veterinarian for that particular area.

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Cancer Prevalent in Pets but Treatable, Says Veterinarian

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Common cancers in humans are also common cancers in pets. A Kansas State University veterinarian lays out the warning signs that could indicate your dog or cat has cancer.

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When Dogs Drink Water

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If you've ever watched a dog drink water, you know that it can be a sloshy, spilly, splashy affair -- in other words, adorable. Behind all of the happy, wet messes, however, lies the mechanical logic of carnivorous compensation -- dogs splash when they drink because they have the cheeks of a predatory quadruped. By studying the drinking habits of various dog breeds and sizes, researchers have recently identified and modeled the fluid dynamics at play when dogs drink water.

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Duquesne Biology Professor Volunteers Her Skills and “Cattitude,” One Feral Colony at a Time

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Becky Morrow, assistant professor of biological sciences at Duquesne University, a licensed veterinarian and a scholar who gets her hands dirty helping communities from Clarion to the West Virginia border control feral cat colonies.

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Cats and Athletes Teach Robots to Fall

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Georgia Tech studies mid-air orientation and impact behavior in both cats and humans as it applies to reduced impact in falling robots, especially those that one day may be used for search-and-rescue missions in hazardous conditions.

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The Cat’s Meow: Genome Reveals Clues to Domestication​​

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Cats and humans have shared the same households for at least 9,000 years, but we still know very little about how our feline friends became domesticated. An analysis of the cat genome led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reveals some surprising clues. The research appears Nov. 10 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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New Natural Supplement Relieves Canine Arthritis

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Arthritis pain in dogs can be relieved, with no side effects, by a new product based on medicinal plants and dietary supplements that was developed at the University of Montreal’s Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.

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For Tiger Populations, a New Threat

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Along with the pressures of habitat loss, poaching and depletion of prey species, a new threat to tiger populations in the wild has surfaced in the form of disease, specifically, canine distemper virus (CDV). According to a new study from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and its partners, CDV has the potential to be a significant driver in pushing the animals toward extinction.

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New Tech Aims to Improve Communication Between Dogs and Humans

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NC State researchers have developed a suite of technologies that can be used to enhance communication between dogs and humans, which has applications in everything from search and rescue to service dogs to training our pets.

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Strong Bonds with Pets May Help Foster Resiliency in Military-Connected Children

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Developing resiliency has important benefits for children, especially those from military families faced with significant challenges such as parental deployment and frequent moves. New Tufts University research published online in Applied Developmental Science supports the idea that, along with other key resources, strong attachments to animals may help military-connected children develop resiliency and other positive developmental traits.