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Yale Puts Prehistoric Mystery Meat to the Test (Spoiler Alert: It’s Not Woolly Mammoth OR Giant Ground Sloth)

Sorry, Explorers Club, but woolly mammoth is no longer on the menu. Neither is the giant ground sloth.

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Reviving Ancient Technology to Save a Monument

See stunning videos and photos from a one-of-a-kind archaeology project in Petra, Jordan.

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New Research Sharpens Understanding of Poison-Arrow Hunting in Africa

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While academic awareness of African peoples' hunting with poison-tipped arrows extends back for centuries, knowledge of the ingenious practice has been scattered among chemistry, entomology and anthropology texts.

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Maya Healers’ Conception of Cancer May Help Bridge Gap in Multicultural Settings Care

Understanding and integrating patients’ cultural beliefs into cancer treatment plans may help improve their acceptance of and adherence to treatment in multicultural settings. Researchers examined traditional Maya healers’ understanding of cancer and published their findings online today in the Journal of Global Oncology.

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Expert Can Comment on Threat to World's Antiquities, Looting

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Modern Technology Brings Ancient History to Columbus State University

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Columbus State University students are busy cataloguing and analyzing one of the oldest and best-preserved Peruvian archeological collections in the world thanks to Facebook and the hard work of a tech-savvy anthropology professor.

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Shared Culture of Nudism in Unified Germany

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While the practice of spending time in nature without clothes had become a major family leisure pursuit in the “repressive” East Germany, nudism remained a fringe and/or counterculture movement for West Germans. After the nation reunited, however, an openness to nudism became one of the few cultural exports from East to West.

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Is Europe Dying?

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More people in Europe are dying than are being born, according to a new report co-authored by a Texas A&M University demographer. In contrast, births exceed deaths, by significant margins, in Texas and elsewhere in the U.S., with few exceptions.

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The First European Farmers Are Traced Back to Anatolia

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Human material from the Anatolian site Kumtepe was used in the study. The material was heavily degraded, but yielded enough DNA for the doctorate student Ayca Omrak to address questions concerning the demography connected to the spread of farming. She conducted her work at the Archaeological Research Laboratory.

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New Research Shows Same Growth Rate for Farming, Non-Farming Prehistoric People

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Prehistoric human populations of hunter-gatherers in a region of North America grew at the same rate as farming societies in Europe, according to a new radiocarbon analysis involving researchers from the University of Wyoming and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

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Scientists Sequence First Ancient Irish Human Genomes

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The genomes show unequivocal evidence for mass migrations into Ireland. These genetic influxes are likely to have brought cultural changes including the transition to agriculture, Bronze metalworking and may have been the origin of western Celtic language.

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Iron-Age Norwegians Liked Their Bling

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Seen from the air, the peninsula that is home to the mid-Norway town of Ørland and the nation’s Main Air Station, looks like the head of a seahorse with its nose pointed south. It didn’t always look this way, though.

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'Red Deer Cave People' Bone Points to Mysterious Species of Pre-Modern Human

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A thigh bone found in China suggests an ancient species of human thought to be long extinct may have survived until as recently as the end of the last Ice Age.

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University of Haifa Excavations Uncover Unique Hebrew Inscription Showing Existence of a Jewish Village at Kursi

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This first evidence of a Jewish village on the site strengthens the hypothesis, that until now was no more than folklore, that this is the “Kursi” mentioned in the New Testament as one of the sites where Jesus performed his miracles

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The Leonard C. Goodman Institute for Investigative Reporting Is Now Accepting Submissions

The deadline for this round of proposals is January 15, 2016. Candidates will be notified of decisions by the end of February 2016. The Institute pays a competitive rate--and covers expenses--for investigative reporting that advances social and economic justice. All stories are published in In These Times magazine and on InTheseTimes.com.

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Antiquity's Hermaphroditus - a Gender Bender

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The view that androgynous individuals are pathologically deviant has caused scholars to reject the possibility that the mythological figure Hermaphroditus could be perceived as erotically attractive. But the Romans had a different view of sexuality and a new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg shows that Hermaphroditus was an object of in particular men's desire.

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Humans Evolved to Get Better Sleep in Less Time

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Insomniacs take heart: Humans get by on significantly less sleep than our closest animal relatives. The secret, according to a new study, is that our sleep is more efficient.

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Millet: The Missing Link in Prehistoric Humans' Transition From Hunter-Gatherer to Farmer

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New research shows a cereal familiar today as birdseed was carried across Eurasia by ancient shepherds and herders laying the foundation, in combination with the new crops they encountered, of 'multi-crop' agriculture and the rise of settled societies. Archaeologists say 'forgotten' millet has a role to play in modern crop diversity and today's food security debate.

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Evidence at Former Quarry Could Help Unlock Secrets of Neanderthal Britain

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Tests carried out by a University of Southampton archaeologist have confirmed a former chalk quarry holds vital clues about prehistoric climate and the early human occupation of the UK.

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