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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Apr-2018 1:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693147

First Genetic Evidence of Ongoing Mating Between Two Distinct Species of Guenon Monkeys

Florida Atlantic University

A new study of guenon monkeys in Gombe National Park is the first to provide genetic evidence of ongoing mating between two distinct species. These monkeys have successfully been producing hybrid offspring for hundreds maybe even thousands of years. Prior studies have suggested that their different physical characteristics keeps them from interbreeding. So, if their faces don’t match, they shouldn’t be mating, right? Wrong, according to this latest evidence.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Apr-2018 7:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 692675

Human-like Walking Mechanics Evolved Before the Genus Homo

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

A close examination of 3.6 million year old hominin footprints discovered in Laetoli, Tanzania suggests our ancestors evolved the hallmark trait of extended leg, human-like bipedalism substantially earlier than previously thought.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693051

NYITCOM at A-State Professor Lends Anatomy Expertise to Solve Ancient Mystery

New York Institute of Technology

Scientists have long wondered why the physical traits of Neanderthals, the ancestors of modern humans, differ greatly from today’s man. In particular, researchers have deliberated the factors that necessitated early man’s forward-projecting face and oversized nose. As published in the April 4 edition of The Royal Proceedings Society B, an international research team led by a professor at the University of New England in Australia, with the aid of an anatomy and fluid dynamics expert at NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine at Arkansas State University (NYITCOM at A-State), may have the answer.

Released:
18-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692826

Surviving Climate Change, Then and Now

Universite de Montreal

An archeological dig in Italy reveals that prehistoric humans made it through a major natural disaster by cooperating with each other – and that's a lesson for our future.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 5:00 AM EDT
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Arts and Humanities

HiSeq1.jpg

Article ID: 692682

DHS S&T Helps Solve Mystery of 4,000-Year-Old Mummy

Homeland Security's Science & Technology Directorate

DHS S&T recently used advanced DNA sequencing to determine the identity of a 4,000-year-old mummy head found in 1915, when American explorers entered an ancient tomb cut in the parched limestone cliffs of the eastern bank of the Nile River, 155 miles south of Cairo.

Released:
12-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692613

The Skull’s Petrous Bone and What It Can Tell Us About Ancient Humans: Q & A with Genetic Archaeologist David Reich

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Genetic archaeologist David Reich discusses how DNA retrieved from inch-long bone in the skull has accelerated our understanding of ancient humans.

Released:
12-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692389

S&T Historian’s New Book Chronicles America’s First Female Egyptologist

Missouri University of Science and Technology

A Missouri University of Science and Technology historian is telling the seemingly forgotten story of America’s first female Egyptologist.

Released:
6-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Arts and Humanities

Article ID: 691777

New Technology Reveals Secrets of Famous Neandertal Skeleton La Ferrassie 1

Binghamton University, State University of New York

An international team of researchers, led by Dr. Asier Gomez-Olivencia of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and including Binghamton University anthropologist Rolf Quam, has provided new insights on one of the most famous Neandertal skeletons, discovered over 100 years ago: La Ferrassie 1.

Released:
27-Mar-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 691678

The Special Role of Pigeons in Greening the Negev 1,500 Years Ago

University of Haifa

New study at the University of Haifa reveals the first archeological evidence of the role played by pigeons in Byzantine agriculture in the Negev: improving and fertilizing soil in vineyards and orchards

Released:
26-Mar-2018 1:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 691381

Why Aren't Humans ‘Knuckle-Walkers’?

Case Western Reserve University

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have cracked the evolutionary mystery of why chimpanzees and gorillas walk on their knuckles: The short explanation is that these African apes climb trees and they are mobile on the ground.

Released:
20-Mar-2018 9:30 AM EDT
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