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Life

Arts and Humanities, Education

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Guggenheim Fellowships, Guggenheim Fellow, Skidmore College, Archaeologist, ancient Mesoamerica, Maya murals , Maya culture

Skidmore College Professor Honored with Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship

Skidmore College faculty member and alumna is honored with prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship, Associate Professor Heather Hurst is one of 173 scholars, artists, and scientists chosen for the 2017 Guggenheim Award from nearly 3,000 applicants. Hurst’s specialization in ancient Mesoamerica research and her interdisciplinary work involving archaeologists, materials scientists, conservators, and art historians has contributed to cultural heritage preservation in the study of Maya culture.

Science

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polluted water, Chesapeake Bay, Chesapeake oysters, Environment

Chesapeake Bay Pollution Extends to Early 19th Century

Humans began measurably and negatively impacting water quality in the Chesapeake Bay in the first half of the 19th century, according to a study of eastern oysters by researchers at The University of Alabama.

Life

Education

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Wichita State University Professor, Students Continue Research on Archaeological Discovery

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Donald Blakeslee, professor of archaeology at Wichita State University, presented in March at the annual conference of the Society for American Archaeology discussing recent archaeological evidence that shows a thriving ancestral Wichita Indian town of more than 20,000 residents near Arkansas City, Kansas.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Living Dead, Historic England, University of Southampton, Alistair Pike, Wharram Percy

New Archaeological Evidence Throws Light on Efforts to Resist ‘the Living Dead’

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A new scientific study of medieval human bones, excavated from a deserted English village, suggests the corpses they came from were burnt and mutilated. Researchers from the University of Southampton and Historic England believe this was carried out by villagers who believed that it would stop the corpses rising from their graves and menacing the living.

Science

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Archaeology, Anthropology, hunter-gatherer, Domestication, Jordan Valley, Maasai, mice

Mouse in the House Tells Tale of Human Settlement

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Long before the advent of agriculture, hunter-gatherers began putting down roots in the Middle East, building more permanent homes and altering the ecological balance in ways that allowed the common house mouse to flourish, new research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates.Findings suggest the roots of animal domestication go back to human sedentism thousands of years prior to what has long been considered the dawn of agriculture.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropolgy, Professor, cave of hands, South America, Travel

Anthropology Professor Shares Life in the Field in South America in Latest Book

Jerry Moore, professor and chair of the Department of Anthropology at California State University, Dominguez Hills (CSUDH), has authored the book “Incidence of Travel: Recent Journeys in Ancient South America.”

Life

Arts and Humanities

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museum collections, Anthropology, Smithsonian, Culture, African Diaspora

Mark Auslander Named MSU Museum Director

Mark Auslander, a sociocultural anthropologist, has been appointed director of the Michigan State University Museum. He will lead one of the earliest established museums in the nation, and the state’s first museum to receive Smithsonian affiliate status. “I’m honored to join the MSU Museum, a museum known for the remarkable depth and breadth of its scientific and cultural collections and for its innovative exhibits and public programs,” said Auslander, who will begin his position on July 1.

Science

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University Of Texas At Austin, Chris Kirk, Gabrielle Russo, Anthropology, Human Evolution, evolutionary anthropology, foramen magnum, Bipedal, Bipedalism

Human Skull Evolved Along with Two-Legged Walking, Study Confirms

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The evolution of bipedalism in fossil humans can be detected using a key feature of the skull — a claim that was previously contested but now has been further validated by researchers at Stony Brook University and The University of Texas at Austin.

Science

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Fossil, human remains, Cranium, Fossils, Anthroplogy, Archaelogy, Evolution, anthropologists, Binghamton University, Binghamton, SUNY Binghamton, Humans, Neandertal, Middle Pleistocene, Portugal, Ancestors, aroeira, iberian peninsula, Anatomy, Human Fossils, Antiquity, hominim

400,000-Year-Old Fossil Human Cranium Is Oldest Ever Found in Portugal

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A large international research team, directed by the Portuguese archaeologist João Zilhão and including Binghamton University anthropologist Rolf Quam, has found the oldest fossil human cranium in Portugal, marking an important contribution to knowledge of human evolution during the middle Pleistocene in Europe and to the origin of the Neandertals.

Medicine

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Neandertal, dental plaque, Teeth, Ancient Dna, Archaelology, Oral Health

Dental Plaque DNA Shows Neandertals Used ‘Aspirin’

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Ancient DNA found in the dental plaque of Neandertals – our nearest extinct relative – has provided remarkable new insights into their behaviour, diet and evolutionary history, including their use of plant-based medicine to treat pain and illness.







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