Feature Channels:

Archaeology and Anthropology

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Nature, Anthropology, Animal Research

Wild Monkeys Use Loud Calls to Assess the Relative Strength of Rivals

Gelada males—a close relative to baboons—pay attention to the loud calls of a rival to gain information about his relative fighting ability compared to themselves, a new study indicated.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Anthroplogy, Consolation, post-aggression, Chimpanzee, human consolation , Aggression, Bystander, Victim, Robbery, Peace Studies

Study Finds Chimpanzees and Humans Console Victims of Aggression in Similar Ways

The new study is the first to observe consolation in adult humans. Researchers analyzed surveillance camera footage of the immediate aftermath of 22 nonfatal robberies to observe the behaviors and characteristics of victims and bystanders — knowledge that helps correct the impression that humans are aggressive by nature and peaceful by culture.

Life

Arts and Humanities

Channels:

Acoustics, cave paintings, acoustic study, Resonance, reverberation, Paleolithic, cave art, David Lubman, Acoustics ’17 Boston

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Jun-2017 2:30 PM EDT

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Researchers Pinpoint How Detecting Social Signals May Have Affected How We See Colors

Higham2017Web.jpg

The arrangement of the photoreceptors in our eyes allows us to detect socially significant color variation better than other types of color vision, a team of researchers has found. Specifically, our color vision is superior at spotting “social signaling,” such as blushing or other facial color changes—even when compared to the type of color vision that we design for digital cameras and other photographic devices.

Science

Channels:

Dinosaur, Paleontology, Paleontologist, dinosaur discovery, Dinosaurs, Fossil, Technology, Scanning, CT, 3D, Teeth, Discovery, Prehistoric, dino, WMG, Warwick, Research, Engineering, Tech

World’s ‘First Named Dinosaur’ Reveals New Teeth with Scanning Tech

Megalosaurusresized-creditUniversityofWarwickMarkGarlick.jpg

Pioneering technology has shed fresh light on the world’s first scientifically-described dinosaur fossil – over 200 years after it was first discovered - thanks to research by WMG at the University of Warwick and the University of Oxford’s Museum of Natural History.

Science

Channels:

UNLV Human Paleontology Expert Available to Discuss Discovery of 300,000 Year Old Human Remains

D70083_48DL.jpg

Science

Channels:

Discovery in Morocco Points to Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils

BaileyNature2017.png

An international research team has uncovered 300,000 year-old fossil bones of Homo sapiens, a find that represents the oldest reliably dated fossil evidence of our species.

Science

Channels:

Archaeology, Marine Archaeology, Climate Science, Climate Change, environmental archaeology, Underwater Archaeology

UC San Diego Launches Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology

Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Department of Anthropology have recently joined efforts within the University of California San Diego to launch the Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology (SCMA). Researchers with the Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology will conduct fieldwork at key underwater and coastal archaeological sites around the world, studying the influence of marine environments on human cultures.

Science

Channels:

Human Evolution, Evolution, Biology, Science, Water, Groundwater, Springs, Early Humans, Africa, East Africa, Hominins, Climate, Climate Change, East African Rift Valley, East African Rift, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Geology, Rutgers, Rutgers University, New Jersey, NJ

Springs Were Critical Water Sources for Early Humans in East Africa, Rutgers Study Finds

HomininSpringsHighRes.jpg

About 1 to 2 million years ago, early humans in East Africa periodically faced very dry conditions, with little or no water in sight. But they likely had access to hundreds of springs that lingered despite long dry spells, allowing our ancestors to head north and out of Africa, according to a groundbreaking study by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other institutions. The international team showed that climate may not play such a primary role in human evolution as is commonly asserted.

Life

Arts and Humanities

Channels:

Anthropology, Archaeology, PERU, South America, Pleistocene, Holocene, Early Americans, Ice Age

Northern Coast of Peru Was a Hospitable Rest Stop for Early Americans

HuacaPrietarushmatting.jpg

An exceptionally well-preserved site in northern Peru suggests that early Americans migrating south along the Pacific coast may not have always moved as quickly as we thought--instead, they may have stopped and "settled in for a good long while" along the way.







Chat now!