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Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Archaeology, Australia, Anthropology

Artifacts Suggest Humans Arrived in Australia Earlier Than Thought

A team of researchers, including a faculty member and seven students from the University of Washington, has found and dated artifacts in northern Australia that indicate humans arrived there about 65,000 years ago — more than 10,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Science

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Dogs, Reseach, Animals

Study Reveals Origin of Modern Dog Has a Single Geographic Origin

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By analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team led by Krishna R. Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor of Ecology & Evolution in the College of Arts & Sciences at Stony Brook University, has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The finding, to be published in Nature Communications, suggests a single domestication event of modern dogs from a population of gray wolves that occurred between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.

Medicine

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Skeletons, Anthropology, D, Social inequality, Poverty, Health, Sickness, Syphilis, Tuberculosis, Pneumonia, Infectious Diseases, Mississippi State University

MSU Anthropology Professor Looks to the Past to Understand Modern Disease Transmission

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A fascination with skeletons and the clues they provide about those who lived in the past led Molly Zuckerman to pursue a career in anthropology. Now an associate professor in Mississippi State University’s Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures, Zuckerman is using lessons from ancient skeletal remains to guide insight into the spread of diseases today.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York, Carl Lipo, Lipo, Easter Island, Rapu Nui, Chile, Anthropology, Anakena, Ahu Tepeu

Easter Island Not Victim of ‘Ecocide’, Analysis of Remains Shows

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Analysis of remains found on Rapa Nui, Chile (Easter Island) provides evidence contrary to the widely-held belief that the ancient civilization recklessly destroyed its environment, according to new research co-conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Archaeology, phenomenology, GIS techology, Chaco Canyon , Pueblo Bonito, Sound, landscape studies, Hearing

Archaeologists Put Sound Back Into a Previously Silent Past

Many attempts to explain how past people experienced their wider world have focused on sight at the expense of sound, but researchers from the University at Albany and the University at Buffalo have developed a tool that puts sound back into the ancient landscape.

Science

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Anthropology, Archaeology, Conservation Biology, Plants, ancient diet, Agriculture, Native American, Potato

Utah Is Home to Earliest Use of a Wild Potato in North America

Researchers have discovered the earliest evidence of wild potato use in North America. This is the first archaeological study to identify a spud-bearing species native to the southwestern United States, the Four Corners potato (S. jamesii), as an important part of ancient human diets.

Science

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Archaeology, ROME, cement production, Construction material, Corrosion

How Seawater Strengthens Ancient Roman Concrete

While modern marine concrete structures crumble within decades, 2,000-year-old Roman piers and breakwaters endure to this day, and are stronger now than when they were first constructed. University of Utah geologist Marie Jackson studies the minerals and microscale structures of Roman concrete as she would a volcanic rock. She and her colleagues have found that seawater filtering through the concrete leads to the growth of interlocking minerals that lend the concrete added cohesion.

Science

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Roman, Roman concrete, Concrete, Cement, Berkeley, University of California, Berkeley, UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL, Berkeley Lab, Chemistry, pumice, Volcanology, Earth Science, Volcano, Italy, Ancient, Archaeology

New Studies of Ancient Concrete Could Teach Us to Do as the Romans Did

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A new look inside 2,000-year-old Roman concrete has provided new clues to the evolving chemistry and mineral cements that allow ancient harbor structures to withstand the test of time.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Acoustics, cave paintings, acoustic study, Resonance, reverberation, Paleolithic, cave art, David Lubman, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Acoustic Scientist Sounds Off About the Location of Cave Paintings

One popular theory about the Paleolithic cave paintings proposes that sites were chosen based on the acoustics in the caves. The originators of the theory reported a causal connection between the “points of resonance” in three French caves and the position of Paleolithic cave paintings. David Lubman, an acoustic scientist and fellow of ASA, will share some of the insights from his research during Acoustics ’17 Boston, held June 25-29, in Boston, Massachusetts.

Medicine

Channels:

Nature, Anthropology, Animal Research

Wild Monkeys Use Loud Calls to Assess the Relative Strength of Rivals

Gelada males—a close relative to baboons—pay attention to the loud calls of a rival to gain information about his relative fighting ability compared to themselves, a new study indicated.







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