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Science

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Anthropology, Evolution, Paleontology, Biochemistry, Glycobiology, Glycans

When Ancient Fossil DNA Isn’t Available, Ancient Glycans May Help Trace Human Evolution

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Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and collaborators discovered a new kind of glycan (sugar chain) that survives even in a 4 million-year-old animal fossil from Kenya, under conditions where ancient DNA does not. While ancient hominin fossils are not yet available for glycan analysis, this proof-of-concept study, published September 11 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, sets the stage for unprecedented explorations of human origins and diet.

Science

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Anthropocene Epoch, Astrobiology

Earth as Hybrid Planet: New Classification Scheme Places Anthropocene Era in Astrobiological Context

A team of researchers including Marina Alberti of the University of Washington has devised a new classification scheme for the evolutionary stages of worlds based on "non-equilibrium thermodynamics" — a planet's energy flow being out of synch, as the presence of life could cause.

Medicine

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Prof. Danny Rosenberg, Dr. Florian Klimscha, German Archaeological Institute in Berlin, Tel Tsaf, Food Storage, Rituals, Elites

The Connection between an Unusual Pottery vessel and the Development of the Elites

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Researchers from the University of Haifa and the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin have found a unique pottery vessel dating back some 7,200 years ago. The unique vessel was apparently used for ritual purposes, ensuring that certain people or groups could maintain their ability to store large quantities of crops

Science

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Geography, archealogy, energy & environmental research

To Aid Utilities, Researchers Seek Ancient Floods Near Tennessee River

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With funding from energy utilities, researchers from The University of Alabama are leading a study to understand the frequency and possible size of ancient floods along the Tennessee River.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Bible, Gospels, Gospel Commentary, Textual analysis

Rediscovery of the Earliest Latin Commentary on the Gospels, Translated Into English

The earliest Latin Commentary on the Gospels, lost for over 1500 years, has been rediscovered and made available in English for the first time, thanks to research from the University of Birmingham.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Professor of Anthropology Julia King Awarded $240,000 Grant for Native American Study

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St. Mary’s College of Maryland Professor of Anthropology Julia King, in collaboration with the Virginia Department of Historic Resources (DHR), Chesapeake Conservancy, and the state-recognized Rappahannock Tribe of Virginia, have been awarded a $240,000 grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities to trace the history and development of the Rappahannock Indians in early American history (200-1850 AD).

Science

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Grant, Anthropology, art, medieval studies, Philosophy, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, Guilt

Katharina Von Kellenbach, St. Mary's College of Maryland Professor of Religious Studies, to Lead Study of Guilt as a Culturally Productive Force

Katharina von Kellenbach, professor of religious studies and her colleague Matthias Buschmeier (German literature, University of Bielefeld) were awarded a prestigious grant for over €500,000 (about $600,000) by the Center for Interdisciplinary Research (ZIF) at the University of Bielefeld for the 2018-2019 academic year.

Science

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Fossils, Apes and Human Evolution, Apes, Evolution, Science, Environment, Africa, Kenya, Anthropology, Miocene, South Turkana, Napudet, Nyanzapithecus alesi, Nyanzapithecines, Skull, Geology, Humans, Primates, Hominoids, Cranium, lava, volcanic ash, Basalt, Oligocene, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, Rutgers, Rutgers University, RU, New Jersey, NJ, Rutgers Geology Mus

New Ape Species Named After 13-Million-Year-Old Skull Discovery

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A 13-million-year-old infant ape skull – the oldest known fossil of its kind – is a new species that enhances knowledge of ape and human evolution, according to a study by an international team of scientists, including Craig S. Feibel at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

Science

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Apes, Archology, ancestral link, Ancestor, Research, Science, Discovery

New 13 Million-Year-Old Infant Skull Sheds Light on Ape Ancestry

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The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. The find, announced in the scientific journal Nature on August 10th, belongs to an infant that lived about 13 million years ago. The research was done by an international team led by Isaiah Nengo of the​ Stony Brook University-affiliated ​Turkana Basin Institute, Stony Brook University, and De Anza College, U.S.A.

Science

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Evolution, Paleontology, Mammals, Fossils

First Winged Mammals From the Jurassic Period Discovered

Two 160 million-year-old mammal fossils discovered in China show that the forerunners of mammals in the Jurassic Period evolved to glide and live in trees. With long limbs, long hand and foot fingers, and wing-like membranes for tree-to-tree gliding, Maiopatagium furculiferum and Vilevolodon diplomylos are the oldest known gliders in the long history of early mammals.







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