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Science

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Nectar, nectaries, Reproduction, Plant, Flower, Flower Development, Herbivore, Pollinate, Pollination

Have Flowers Devised the Perfect Weapon of Distraction?

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Nectar, the high-energy ‘honey’ produced by flowers, might be a brilliant distraction technique to help protect a flower’s reproductive parts, according to new research. Rather than merely providing a ‘come-on’ to bees and other insects to attract them to pollinate the flower, nectar could be playing a much more subtle and entrancing role.

Medicine

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High Blood Pressure, pediatric hypertension, Blood Pressure, High blood pressure in children, aap guidelines, AAP, Pediatrics, childrens health, Childhood Obesity, Hypertension, Childrens Hospital, Pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist

Author/Expert Available to Discuss AAP’s New Guidelines for Diagnosing and Treating High Blood Pressure in Children

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Brain Pressure, Diabetes, Obesity, University of Birmingham, UK

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Aug-2017 2:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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Organic Chemistry, human milk, Oligosaccharides, Antimicrobial Agent, Antimicrobial Drug Resistance, Strep B, ESKAPE pathogens

Sugars in Human Mother’s Milk Are New Class of Antibacterial Agents

A new study has found that sugars in mother's' milk do not just provide nutrition for babies but also help protect them from bacterial infections, making them a new class of antimicrobial agent.

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No Guts No Glory: Harvesting the Microbiome of Athletes

Elite athletes work hard to excel in sports, but they may also get a natural edge from the bacteria that inhabit their digestive tracts. Scientists have now tapped into the microbiome of exceptional runners and rowers, and have identified particular bacteria that may aid athletic performance. The goal is to develop probiotic supplements that may help athletes — and even amateur fitness enthusiasts — recover from a tough workout or more efficiently convert nutrients to energy.

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Mussel-Inspired Glue Could One Day Make Fetal Surgery Safer

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Whether to perform surgery on a fetus is a heart-wrenching decision. This type of surgery involves penetrating the highly delicate amniotic sac, increasing health risks to the fetus. Now researchers report the development of a glue, inspired by the tenacious grip of mussels on slippery rocks, that could one day help save the lives of the youngest patients.

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Energized Fabrics Could Keep Soldiers Warm and Battle-Ready in Frigid Climates

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Soldiering in arctic conditions is tough. Protective clothing can be heavy and can cause overheating and sweating upon exertion. And hands and feet can grow numb despite wearing such gear. To keep military personnel more comfortable and battle-ready in bitterly cold climes, scientists are now conducting research aimed at creating high-tech fabrics that heat up when powered and that capture sweat. These fabrics could also conceivably make their way to consumer clothing in the future.

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Testing TVs and Tablets for ‘Green’ Screens

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To improve viewing pleasure, companies have developed television — and tablet screens — that include quantum dots to enhance brightness and color. Some quantum dots are made with potentially harmful metals, which could leach into the environment when the device is discarded. But other TVs made with less hazardous nanomaterials require more energy to make.

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Silk Could Improve Sensitivity, Flexibility of Wearable Body Sensors

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From smart socks to workout clothes that measure exertion, wearable body sensors are becoming the latest “must-have” technology. Now scientists report they are on the cusp of using silk, one of the world’s most coveted fabrics, to develop a more sensitive and flexible generation of these multi-purpose devices that monitor a slew of body functions in real time.

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Sugars in Some Breast Milk Could Help Protect Babies From Group B Strep

Group B strep (GBS) bacteria remain the leading cause of severe infections in newborns worldwide. Now researchers have found that although the pathogen can be transmitted to infants through breastfeeding, some mothers produce protective sugars in their milk that could help prevent infection. They also report that the sugars can act as anti-biofilm agents, which is the first example of carbohydrates in human milk having this function.







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