Shingles: A Common and Painful Virus

Loyola Physician Talks about the Varicella-Zoster Virus that Causes Shingles

Released: 26-Feb-2014 12:00 PM EST
Source Newsroom: Loyola University Health System
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Newswise — MAYWOOD, Ill. – Shingles is a painful viral infection that affects almost one million people worldwide and 30 percent of Americans every year. Known as herpes zoster, it’s caused by the same virus that causes chicken pox, the varicella-zoster virus. The outbreak occurs mostly in people older than 50 because the virus can lay dormant in the nerve tissue of the body for many years then become activated and cause shingles later in life.

“If you are diagnosed with shingles, you are contagious as long as you have blisters and ulcers. Since it can be spread from person to person it is important to cover your rash and wash your hands frequently. It also is important to avoid people who have not received the chicken pox vaccine, pregnant women and anyone with a weak immune system,” said Khalilah Babino, DO, immediate care physician at Loyola University Health System and assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

There are some conditions which put people more at-risk:
• Cancer
• Autoimmune disorders
• Chronic lung or kidney disease
• History of chicken pox

A shingles outbreak can last several weeks. Even before the rash appears the following symptoms may occur:
• Fatigue
• Headache
• Tingling
• Itching
• Burning Pain

After a few days a blistering rash in clusters appears. The shingles rash is always located along the involved nerve pattern called a dermatome, typically in a band on one side of the body. If the rash crosses the midline of the body, it is not shingles. Most commonly the rash is on the chest and/or back. However, it can occur on other body parts.

“If you develop shingles on your face, especially near your eye, you should seek immediate medical care as this type may result in loss of vision,” Babino said.
The blisters that form will pop in a few days and become open ulcers which are contagious. These ulcers typically scab over within 7-10 days and the rash usually resolves within 4 weeks.

“Fortunately, there is antiviral medication to treat shingles. The medication does not kill the virus like antibiotics kill bacteria, but they help slow the virus and speed recovery. The earlier these medications are started, the more effective they are against the virus. I recommend starting these medications within 72 hours of the onset of rash. Since shingles can be very painful, you might also need prescription pain medication,” Babino said.

Most people with shingles do not suffer any complications. Still, there is a 10 percent chance of developing a painful condition after the rash has resolved known as postherpetic neuralgia. This condition can last from a few months to a year.

You can decrease your risk of developing shingles and its complications with the shingles vaccine known as Zostavax. This vaccine is available to people 50 years and older.

“People who have had shingles previously can still receive the vaccine. If you are above the age of 50 years old, you should talk to your healthcare provider about the shingles vaccines,” Babino said.

For media inquires, please contact Evie Polsley at epolsley@lumc.edu or call (708) 216-5313 or (708) 417-5100. Follow Loyola on:
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Loyola University Health System (LUHS) is a member of Trinity Health. Based in the western suburbs of Chicago, LUHS is a quaternary care system with a 61-acre main medical center campus, the 36-acre Gottlieb Memorial Hospital campus and more than 30 primary and specialty care facilities in Cook, Will and DuPage counties. The medical center campus is conveniently located in Maywood, 13 miles west of the Chicago Loop and 8 miles east of Oak Brook, Ill. The heart of the medical center campus, Loyola University Hospital, is a 569-licensed-bed facility. It houses a Level 1 Trauma Center, a Burn Center and the Ronald McDonald® Children’s Hospital of Loyola University Medical Center. Also on campus are the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola Outpatient Center, Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine and Loyola Oral Health Center as well as the LUC Stritch School of Medicine, the LUC Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. Loyola's Gottlieb campus in Melrose Park includes the 264-licensed-bed community hospital, the Professional Office Building housing 150 private practice clinics, the Adult Day Care, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park.


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