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Scientists at UT Southwestern, Karolinska Institutet Identify New and Beneficial Function of Endogenous Retroviruses in Immune Response

Researchers at UT Southwestern and Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, found that endogenous retroviruses (ERV) play a critical role in the body’s immune defense against common bacterial and viral pathogens.

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Breakthrough Discovery by NUS Researchers Contributes Towards Future Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis and Autoimmune Inflammation

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A multi-disciplinary research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has made a breakthrough discovery of a new type of immune cells that may help in the development of a future treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS).

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Researchers Tease Out Glitches in Immune System’s Self-Recognition

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Fast facts: • In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. • A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease.

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Study Shows Rheumatoid Arthritis Support and Education Program Has Strong Positive Impact

The Early RA Support and Education program at Hospital for Special Surgery addresses the needs of people with rheumatoid arthritis. After participating in the free program, based on patient-identified outcomes, 90 percent of participants said they could make informed decisions about their RA.

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Second Protein Associated with Common Cause of Kidney Failure Identified

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An international team of researchers has identified a protein that turns a person’s immune system against itself in a form of kidney disease called membranous nephropathy (MN). The findings are published online in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Very Low or High BMI Makes it More Difficult for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients to Remain in Remission

Hospital for Special Surgery researchers found that body mass index (BMI) plays a role in rheumatoid arthritis patients’ ability to achieve a sustained remission. Those who were significantly underweight or overweight/obese were the least likely to remain in remission.

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Hospital for Special Surgery to Present Innovative Research at American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting

More than 50 studies involving researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City will be presented at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting in Boston.

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Blood Test Could Prevent Medication Trial and Error for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

A molecule in the blood shows promise as a marker to predict whether individual rheumatoid arthritis patients are likely to benefit from biologic medications or other drugs should be tried, a Mayo Clinic-led study shows. The protein, analyzed in blood tests, may help avoid trial and error with medications, sparing patients treatment delays and unnecessary side effects and expense. The research is among several Mayo Clinic studies presented at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting in Boston.

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Dose Reduction of Tnf Inhibitors Safe and Effective for Some Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

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Carefully employing a TNF inhibitor dose-reduction strategy can be just as effective at safely treating RA patients as regular dosing methods, while also saving approximately $7,500 per patient annually.

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Treat-to-Target Approach Prevents Increased Mortality Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis

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Mortality risk for patients with rheumatoid arthritis is reduced to that of the general population when patients are treated with the aim to meet a low disease activity score, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in Boston.

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