Feature Channels: Agriculture

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Newswise: Smart Farms of the Future: Making Bioenergy Crops More Environmentally Friendly
Released: 2-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Smart Farms of the Future: Making Bioenergy Crops More Environmentally Friendly
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Farmers have enough worries – between bad weather, rising costs, and shifting market demands – without having to stress about the carbon footprint of their operations. But now a new set of projects by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) could make agriculture both more sustainable and more profitable.

Newswise: Living Walls: University Researchers Develop Green Tech for Treating Wastewater from Microbreweries
Released: 1-Jun-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Living Walls: University Researchers Develop Green Tech for Treating Wastewater from Microbreweries
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) and Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) researchers received a patent for green wall technology that will provide craft breweries cost-effective and sustainable options for wastewater treatment. The team found a way to make the common Pothos and recycled glass an environmental solution to support the growing microbrewery trend in the region.

Released: 1-Jun-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Global glacier melt raises sea levels and depletes once-reliable water source
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 1, 2020 – The melting of glaciers and ice caps in places as diverse as the Himalayas and Andes mountain ranges, the Svalbard island group and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago has the dual effect of raising global sea levels and depleting freshwater resources that serve millions of people around the world.

28-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers Identify Seasonal Peaks for Foodborne Infections
American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

Using a newly developed approach, researchers have identified seasonal peaks for foodborne infections that could be used to optimize the timing and location of food inspections.

Released: 29-May-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Bangladeshi eggplant farmers reap rewards via genetics
Cornell University

Farmers in Bangladesh achieved significantly higher yields and revenues by growing insect-resistant, genetically engineered eggplant, a new Cornell study has found.

Released: 28-May-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Two Bacteria Allow Spittlebugs to Thrive on Low-Nutrient Meals
Cornell University

A new study examines the symbiotic relationship between two types of bacteria and spittlebugs that helps the insect live on very low-nutrient food. The bacteria use a metabolic “trick” also employed by cancer cells to create the right conditions for converting the poor food into the necessary building blocks for survival.

Released: 27-May-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Patterns in crop data reveal new insight about plants and their environments
Iowa State University

A new study unearthed patterns in datasets collected on rice plants across Asia that allowed researchers to develop a matrix to predict the traits of rice plants depending on their genetics and environment. The approach could lead to better predictability in crop production.

Released: 22-May-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Algal genome provides insights into first land plants
Cornell University

Cornell researchers have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a single-celled alga that belongs to the closest lineage to terrestrial plants and provides many clues to how aquatic plants first colonized land.

Newswise: 232066_web.jpg
Released: 15-May-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Model of critical infrastructures reveals vulnerabilities
Kansas State University

An interdisciplinary team of Kansas State University researchers developed a computer simulation that revealed beef supply chain vulnerabilities that need safeguarding -- a realistic concern during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: Global Cooling Event 4,200 Years Ago Spurred Rice’s Evolution, Spread Across Asia
15-May-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Global Cooling Event 4,200 Years Ago Spurred Rice’s Evolution, Spread Across Asia
New York University

A major global cooling event that occurred 4,200 years ago may have led to the evolution of new rice varieties and the spread of rice into both northern and southern Asia, an international team of researchers has found.

Newswise: Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
Released: 14-May-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
Cornell University

A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health.

Newswise: Benson Hill Contracts 30,000 Acres of Premium Soybean for 2020
Released: 14-May-2020 8:20 AM EDT
Benson Hill Contracts 30,000 Acres of Premium Soybean for 2020
Benson Hill

Benson Hill’s non-GMO soybean product line combines superior nutritional qualities and oil content with highly competitive yields, offering benefits from seed-to-shelf.

Newswise: Persistence of forages is dependent on harvest intervals
Released: 14-May-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Persistence of forages is dependent on harvest intervals
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Research investigates effects of harvest intervals on alfalfa productivity and persistence in southeastern United States.

Newswise: Researchers to explore perennial grains with $1.77M grant
Released: 13-May-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Researchers to explore perennial grains with $1.77M grant
Cornell University

A Cornell University researcher is part of a multi-institution team helping upstate New York organic farmers grow and increase profitability of perennial grain crops, which can be planted once and will yield grain for multiple years.

Newswise: Plant biologist to use NSF grant for maize development study
Released: 13-May-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Plant biologist to use NSF grant for maize development study
Cornell University

Cornell University plant biologist Michael Scanlon received a $1.8 million grant from the National Science Foundation Plant Genome Research Program to continue his research on the process of shoot development in maize.

Newswise: El Niño–linked decreases in soil moisture could trigger massive tropical-plant die offs
Released: 11-May-2020 10:20 AM EDT
El Niño–linked decreases in soil moisture could trigger massive tropical-plant die offs
Los Alamos National Laboratory

New research has found that El Niño events are often associated with droughts in some of the world’s more vulnerable tropical regions. Associated with warmer than average ocean temperatures in the eastern Pacific, El Niños can in turn influence global weather patterns and tropical precipitation, and these changes can lead to massive plant die-offs if other extreme factors are also at play.

Released: 7-May-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Texas A&M AgriLife mobilizes “murder hornet” task force to head off possible emergence in Texas
Texas A&M AgriLife

A giant invasive hornet was sighted several times in northwestern Washington state and Canada in late 2019, causing concern across the U.S. At the request of Gov. Greg Abbott, a specialized task force led by Texas A&M AgriLife experts is spearheading an initiative to protect Texas citizens, agriculture and honey bees if the “murder hornet,” or Asian giant hornet, arrives.

Released: 5-May-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics, warn scientists
University of Sheffield

Research from the University of Sheffield and the University of Bath has discovered how a common pathogen is able to infect both cattle and humans

Released: 4-May-2020 6:20 PM EDT
Expansion, environmental impacts of irrigation by 2050 greatly underestimated
Princeton University

The amount of farmland around the world that will need to be irrigated in order to feed an estimated global population of 9 billion people by 2050 could be up to several billion acres, far higher than scientists currently project, according to new research.

Newswise: Chemicals from corn may bond durable plastic materials
Released: 4-May-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Chemicals from corn may bond durable plastic materials
South Dakota State University

Bioprocessing engineers formulated star-shaped thermoset resins using chemical from the ethanol fermentation.

Newswise: Bermudagrass Harvest Management Options with Poultry Litter Fertilization
Released: 30-Apr-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Bermudagrass Harvest Management Options with Poultry Litter Fertilization
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Managing Harvests of ‘Russell’ and ‘Tifton 44’ Bermudagrass Receiving Broiler Litter for Phosphorus Removal and Nutritive Value

Newswise: Using cross-laminated timer on low-volume bridges
Released: 29-Apr-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Using cross-laminated timer on low-volume bridges
South Dakota State University

A South Dakota State University faculty member will be the first person in the U.S. to study the use of cross-laminated timber on a low-volume vehicle bridge.

Newswise: Agricultural pickers in US to see unsafely hot workdays double by 2050
Released: 28-Apr-2020 7:05 PM EDT
Agricultural pickers in US to see unsafely hot workdays double by 2050
University of Washington

The average number of unsafely hot summer days could double by 2050 and triple by 2100 in U.S. counties where agricultural crops are grown. The study also looks at different strategies the industry could adopt to protect workers’ health.

Newswise:Video Embedded program-delivers-masks-covid-19-info-for-new-york-farmworkers
VIDEO
Released: 28-Apr-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Program delivers masks, COVID-19 info for New York farmworkers
Cornell University

To help protect farmworkers and slow the spread of COVID-19 in rural New York, the Cornell Farmworker Program is mobilizing local support to make and distribute face masks across the state.

Newswise: Harnessing Psyllid Peptides to Fight Citrus Greening Disease
Released: 28-Apr-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Harnessing Psyllid Peptides to Fight Citrus Greening Disease
Boyce Thompson Institute

Citrus greening disease, also called huanglongbing (HLB), is a bacterial infection of citrus trees that results in small, misshapen and sour fruits that are unsuitable for consumption, ultimately killing the tree.

Released: 27-Apr-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Cornell AgriTech helps New York food, agriculture industry adapt to COVID-19
Cornell University

Cornell AgriTech’s Center for Excellence for Food and Agriculture has been helping New York food and agriculture businesses adapt to the COVID-19 economy with new marketing strategies and by diversifying products.

Released: 27-Apr-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Scientists Use Bacteria to Help Plants Grow in Salty Soil
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

A new study has shown that salt-tolerant bacteria can be used to enhance salt tolerance in various types of plants. The new approach could increase crop yield in areas dealing with increasing soil salinity.

Newswise: Industrial Hemp: reviewing history and hysteria
Released: 23-Apr-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Industrial Hemp: reviewing history and hysteria
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Valuable for its fiber, seed and oil, crop is making a return in research and in farmers' fields

Newswise: Picking Up Threads of Cotton Genomics
17-Apr-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Picking Up Threads of Cotton Genomics
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

In Nature Genetics, a multi-institutional team including DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers sequenced and assembled the genomes of the five major cotton lineages to provide breeders with genetic level insights on crop improvements. The genomes are available on JGI’s plant data portal Phytozome.

Newswise: 229440_web.jpg
Released: 17-Apr-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Relying on 'local food' is a distant dream for most of the world
Aalto University

Globalisation has revolutionised food production and consumption in recent decades and cultivation has become more efficient As a result, diets have diversified and food availability has increased in various parts of the globe.

14-Apr-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Returning land to nature with high-yield farming
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new study shows that about half the land currently needed to grow food crops could be spared if attainable crop yields were achieved globally and crops were grown where they are most productive.


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