Feature Channels: Psychology and Psychiatry

Filters close
Released: 13-Jul-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Mental Health Units in Correctional Facilities: Scarce Data but Promising Outcomes
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Specialized mental health units (MHUs) may be critical to managing the high rates of serious mental illness in incarcerated populations. But research data on unit characteristics, services provided, and outcomes achieved by MHUs in correctional facilities are scarce, according to a report in the July/August issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: 7.13.2020WaunShaeOld_Hands__Elderly_GettyImages-962094878.jpg
Released: 13-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Family Caregiving May Not Harm Health of Caregivers After All
Johns Hopkins Medicine

For decades, family caregiving has been thought to create a type of chronic stress that may lead to significant health risks or even death, alarming potential caregivers and presenting a guilt-ridden obstacle for those needing help.

9-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Black Women Often Ignored by Social Justice Movements
American Psychological Association (APA)

Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Newswise: Translated Tool from NCCN Measures Mental Health
Released: 13-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Translated Tool from NCCN Measures Mental Health "Temperature" of People with Cancer
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

The NCCN Distress Thermometer enables discussion and treatment of distress as part of routine care for people with cancer. This free resource is now translated into 46 languages for global accessibility.

Released: 13-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Researchers find the worst reason to give a gift
Ohio State University

Here’s a good way to make sure a friend hates a gift from you: Say it will save him money. In a series of studies, researchers found that people reacted negatively to gifts that they were told – or that they inferred – were given to help them save money.

Newswise: Most older adults say they’ve experienced ageism, but majority still hold positive attitudes toward aging, poll finds
9-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Most older adults say they’ve experienced ageism, but majority still hold positive attitudes toward aging, poll finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

More than 80% of older adults in a new poll say they commonly experience at least one form of ageism in their day-to-day lives. Many say they routinely experience three or more forms, and these older adults were much more likely to have poor mental and physical health. But despite all this, the poll also suggests that most older adults hold positive attitudes toward aging.

Newswise: Reproductive Psychology Program Focuses on Mother and Family Wellness
Released: 13-Jul-2020 7:05 AM EDT
Reproductive Psychology Program Focuses on Mother and Family Wellness
Cedars-Sinai

While many expecting and new mothers experience emotions of joy and happiness, others suffer from a range of mental health conditions like depression, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder. But a new Cedars-Sinai program is dedicated to helping women fight the stigma often associated with maternal-related mental health disorders before, during and after pregnancy.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-links-stress-hormone-with-higher-blood-sugar-in-type-2-diabetes
VIDEO
10-Jul-2020 4:00 PM EDT
Study Links Stress Hormone With Higher Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

A study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine finds a link between the stress hormone cortisol and higher blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Released: 12-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Military Personnel at Risk of Suicide Store Firearms Unsafely
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Military personnel who are at a greater risk of suicide are more likely to unsafely store firearms in unlocked cabinets where they can access them easily, according to a Rutgers researcher.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Otago researchers find link between rape and breathing problems
University of Otago

Rape and sexual trauma may have long-lasting consequences for physical health as well as mental health, University of Otago researchers have found.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 13-Jul-2020 5:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jul-2020 11:15 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 13-Jul-2020 5:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: When child care meets aged care, worlds align
Released: 9-Jul-2020 9:05 PM EDT
When child care meets aged care, worlds align
University of South Australia

While our oldest and youngest generations may seem worlds apart, a new ageing well initiative will bring them together in an innovative intergenerational education and development program that will connect children with older people in a structured way.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
University of Münster

Due to border closures in the wake of the corona crisis, the arrival of refugees in Europe has temporarily dipped.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Parents' smartphone use does not harm parent/child relationships
Edith Cowan University

Contrary to popular views, parental smartphone use is rarely associated with poor parenting, and more often than not, tends to be associated with warm and attached parenting.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Desert island discs: Music listened to in younger years defines us forever, research finds
SAGE Publications UK

Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London analysing the music record choices of guests on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme has found that the music we listen to between the age of 10 and 30 define us for the rest of our lives.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Distorted Passage of Time During the Covid-19 Lockdown
PLOS

A survey conducted in the U.K. suggests that social and physical distancing measures put in place during the Covid-19 pandemic significantly impacted people’s perception of how quickly time passed compared to their pre-lockdown perceptions.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 8:05 PM EDT
Children Who Witness Intimate Partner Violence Benefit from Joint Community and Law Enforcement Intervention
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The Child Trauma Response Team, an innovative police and community-based organization partnership, demonstrated success at screening and treating children for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately following incidents of intimate partner violence, according to a Rutgers-led study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Therapy delivered electronically more effective than face to face: Hamilton researchers
McMaster University

Based on randomized control trials, the systematic review and analysis revealed that cognitive behavioural therapy that connected therapists and patients through such modes as web-based applications, video-conferencing, email and texting, improved patients’ symptoms better than face to face when measured using standardized mood symptoms scales. As well, there was no difference in the level of satisfaction or function between the two methods of delivery.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT
UChicago study shows "Bystander Effect" not exclusive to humans
University of Chicago Medical Center

A rat is less likely to help a trapped companion if it is with other rats that aren’t helping, according to new research from the University of Chicago that showed the social psychological theory of the “bystander effect” in humans is present in these long-tailed rodents.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
UBC research shows hearing persists at end of life
University of British Columbia

Hearing is widely thought to be the last sense to go in the dying process. Now UBC researchers have evidence that some people may still be able to hear while in an unresponsive state at the end of their life.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Dr. Lisa Coyne on Burnout at Home and at Work
McLean Hospital

Join us on Thursday, July 9 at 11am EST as we talk with Dr. Lisa Coyne and answer your questions about burnout, both personally and professionally.

Newswise: ‘Patient Patients’ in Psychiatric Care for Depression Disorders Show Decreased Symptoms
Released: 8-Jul-2020 6:30 AM EDT
‘Patient Patients’ in Psychiatric Care for Depression Disorders Show Decreased Symptoms
Baylor University

Psychiatric inpatients with major depressive disorders who increased in the virtue of patience during hospitalization also showed fewer symptoms of depression, according to a Baylor University study.

Newswise:Video Embedded time-to-get-real-on-the-power-of-positive-thinking-new-study
VIDEO
Released: 7-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Time to get real on the power of positive thinking -- new study
University of Bath

Positive thinking has long been extolled as the route to happiness, but it might be time to ditch the self-help books after a new study shows that realists enjoy a greater sense of long-term wellbeing than optimists.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:00 PM EDT
McLean Hospital's Diego A. Pizzagalli, PhD, Named Editor of Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
McLean Hospital

McLean Hospital’s Diego A. Pizzagalli, PhD, has been named editor of the journal Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience (CABN).

Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Talking with parents empowers Latino youths to engage in community
University of Michigan

When Latino youths lend their voices to political causes—from immigration policies that have separated families to recent Black Lives Matter protests—their resilience originates from home.

2-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Mental Health Benefits of Parks Dimmed by Safety Concerns
NYU Langone Health

No matter how close parks are to home, perceptions of park-centered crime may keep New Yorkers from using them.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Future Teachers More Likely to View Black Children as Angry, Even When They Are Not
North Carolina State University

A study of prospective teachers finds they are more likely to interpret the facial expressions of Black boys and girls as being angry, even when they are not. This is significantly different than how the prospective teachers interpreted the facial expressions of white children.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19
University of Kent

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:40 PM EDT
How Prison and Police Discrimination Affect Black Sexual Minority Men’s Health
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Incarceration and police discrimination may contribute to HIV, depression and anxiety among Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men, a Rutgers led study finds.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Stemming the Spread of Misinformation on Social Media
Association for Psychological Science

New research reported in the journal Psychological Science finds that priming people to think about accuracy could make them more discerning in what they subsequently share on social media.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Nitrous oxide may bring relief to veterans suffering from PTSD, new study suggests
University of Chicago Medical Center

A small pilot study provides an early glimpse of how some veterans struggling with PTSD may benefit from one simple, inexpensive treatment involving nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Prospective teachers misperceive Black children as angry
American Psychological Association (APA)

Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

29-Jun-2020 7:10 AM EDT
Men More Likely than Women to be Seen as Brilliant
New York University

Men are more likely than are women to be seen as “brilliant,” finds a new study measuring global perceptions linked to gender. The work concludes that these stereotyped views are an instance of implicit bias, revealing automatic associations that people cannot, or at least do not, report holding when asked directly.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
New study confirms high prevalence of depression during the menopause transition
North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

Depression has been shown to be prevalent during menopause, affecting as many as 70% of women transitioning into menopause

Released: 1-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Infant sleep problems can signal mental disorders in adolescents -- Study
University of Birmingham

Specific sleep problems among babies and very young children can be linked to mental disorders in adolescents, a new study has found.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Rutgers Institute for Health Names Mariana Figueiro Director for New Center for Healthy Aging
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

Mariana Figueiro, director of the Lighting Research Center, joins the Rutgers University community on Sept. 1 to lead two new programs focused on aging and on sleep and circadian research.

29-Jun-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Barriers to addiction care fell because of COVID-19, experts say; now the challenge is keeping them down
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The opioid epidemic didn’t go away when the coronavirus pandemic began. But rapid changes in regulations and guidance could also help many more people get care for addiction, experts say. They caution that it will take more changes to truly lower barriers that stand in the way of delivering evidence-based addiction care to more people via telemedicine.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
School absenteeism has surprising consequences for adults
Ohio State University

Kids who miss a lot of school from kindergarten to eighth grade may suffer unexpected costs as young adults, a new study finds. Researchers found that those who were more regularly absent in these early years of school were less likely to vote and reported more economic difficulties when they were 22-23 years old.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

It seems there will never be enough “thank you’s” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff members who are working around the clock to help patients who have the dangerous coronavirus disease. The dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Study: New leaders emerge as organizations go to virtual work spaces
Brigham Young University

When work meetings shifted online this spring, some may have noticed new standouts among their colleagues. According to new research, members of virtual teams identify leaders in significantly different ways compared to members of in-person teams.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 7:40 PM EDT
This spring they were heroes, but summer may be cruel for health professionals, experts say
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

An outpouring of public support may have helped maintain the spirits and well-being of health care workers as they faced the early months of the coronavirus pandemic. But as the salutes fade into memory, and COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations rise across the United States, mental health experts are worried about the health care workers-turned-heroes who were so much in the spotlight a few months ago.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Researchers Uncover Effects of Negative Stereotype Exposure on the Brain
University of California, Santa Barbara

“It is clear that people who belong to historically marginalized groups in the United States contend with burdensome stressors on top of the everyday stressors that members of non-disadvantaged groups experience."

Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Stress of COVID-19 pandemic could lead to violence at home, Tulane experts caution
Tulane University

While some COVID-19 stay-at-home orders are being eased across the country, the stress on many families remains high and will be felt even after restrictions are lifted. Physical distancing, isolation and quarantine meausures designed to stop the spread of the virus could lead to an increase in family violence at home, according to a perspective in Pediatrics co-authored by Tulane University child psychiatrists.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Coronavirus: Social distancing accepted when people understand exponential growth
University of Cologne

Researchers from the Social Cognition Center Cologne at the University of Cologne and from the University of Bremen report that participants in three experiments, each involving more than 500 adults in the United States, tended to assume the number of COVID-19 cases grew linearly with time, rather than exponentially.

Newswise: People Feel More Grateful for a ‘Special Favor’ — One Only for Themselves — Than They Do for a Group Benefit
Released: 29-Jun-2020 2:20 PM EDT
People Feel More Grateful for a ‘Special Favor’ — One Only for Themselves — Than They Do for a Group Benefit
Baylor University

People felt less gratitude when they read about receiving a favor along with many other individuals, as opposed to a favor that was only given to themselves, according to a Baylor University study. This is because people tend to think that benefactors who help them as individuals care more about them, specifically, compared to benefactors who help them in a group.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19
University of Kent

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Newswise: Showing pro-diversity feelings are the norm makes individuals more tolerant
28-Jun-2020 7:45 PM EDT
Showing pro-diversity feelings are the norm makes individuals more tolerant
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Showing people how their peers feel about diversity in their community can make their actions more inclusive, make members of marginalized groups feel more like they belong, and even help close racial achievement gaps in education, according to a new study. Drawing on strategies that have worked in anti-smoking, safe-sex and energy-saving campaigns, University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers decided to try to change behavior by showing people that positive feelings about diversity are the norm.

Newswise: Studies examine how race affects perceptions of law-involved Blacks, school discipline
Released: 29-Jun-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Studies examine how race affects perceptions of law-involved Blacks, school discipline
University of Illinois at Chicago

The extent of discriminatory treatment Black adults and children experience at every point of contact within the legal system and the biases that result in Black children’s behavior being managed more harshly in school are detailed in two new analyses from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Newswise: Social Distancing and Dying Alone
Released: 29-Jun-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Social Distancing and Dying Alone
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to drastic changes in how hospitals provide end-of-life care to patients and their families. With strict no-visiting limitations in place in an effort to stem contagion, patients have been dying alone.


Showing results

150 of 4197

close
3.97604