Feature Channels: Psychology and Psychiatry

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Released: 6-May-2021 4:35 PM EDT
Feeling Younger Buffers Older Adults From Stress, Protects Against Health Decline
American Psychological Association (APA)

People who feel younger have a greater sense of well-being, better cognitive functioning, less inflammation, lower risk of hospitalization and even live longer than their older-feeling peers. A study published by the American Psychological Association suggests one potential reason for the link between subjective age and health: Feeling younger could help buffer middle-aged and older adults against the damaging effects of stress.

Released: 6-May-2021 4:20 PM EDT
How to Win Over Vaccine Skeptics: Live Expert Panel for May 20, 3pm ET
Newswise

How to Win Over Vaccine Skeptics: Live Expert Panel for May 20, 3pm ET

Newswise: Blanks for the Memory
Released: 6-May-2021 10:50 AM EDT
Blanks for the Memory
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers report that one kind of perceptual learning can occur in memory-impaired persons who do not actually remember what they learned.

Newswise: Researchers Find Association Between Financial Strain Due to COVID-19 and Depression
Released: 6-May-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Researchers Find Association Between Financial Strain Due to COVID-19 and Depression
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers have found an independent association between COVID-19-related income loss and financial strain and depression, according to the latest study from the COVID-19 Resilience Project, run by the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and Penn Medicine. This association was found in two separate cohorts – one primarily in the United States and one in Israel – and the depressive symptoms worsened over time in participants who were hit financially, above and beyond pandemic-related anxiety. The findings were published today in the Journal of Affective Disorders.

Newswise: 'Breaking the Links' in the Chain of Violence: Journal of Psychiatric Practice Continues Series on Therapeutic Risk Management Approach
Released: 6-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
'Breaking the Links' in the Chain of Violence: Journal of Psychiatric Practice Continues Series on Therapeutic Risk Management Approach
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

With mass shootings and other seemingly meaningless acts of violence in the headlines all too frequently, strategies to assess the risk and reduce the potential for violent acts are sorely needed. The fourth in a series of five columns devoted to therapeutic risk management of violence – focusing on a method called chain analysis to identify and target pathways leading to violent thoughts and behaviors – appears in the May issue of the Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: International Study Links Brain Thinning to Psychosis
Released: 5-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
International Study Links Brain Thinning to Psychosis
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Subtle differences in the shape of the brain that are present in adolescence are associated with the development of psychosis, according to an international team led by psychiatrists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Maastricht University in the Netherlands.

Newswise: Experts Offer Free Guide to Empower Kids and Teens in Handling Emotions During Uncertainty
Released: 5-May-2021 12:05 AM EDT
Experts Offer Free Guide to Empower Kids and Teens in Handling Emotions During Uncertainty
Nationwide Children's Hospital

As parents and caregivers continue to navigate the changing realities of life during a global pandemic, it is important for families to address the emotional and mental health needs of children.

Released: 4-May-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Little to No Increase in Association Between Adolescents’ Mental Health Problems and Digital Technology Engagement
Association for Psychological Science

A new study suggests that over the past 30 years, there has been little to no increase in the association between adolescents’ technology engagement and mental health problems. The study also urges more transparent collaborations between academia and industry.

Newswise: Depression in older adults undergoing hip fracture repair associated with delirium after surgery
Released: 4-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Depression in older adults undergoing hip fracture repair associated with delirium after surgery
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Screening for even mild depressive symptoms before hip fracture repair may be helpful in predicting which patients are at higher risk of developing delirium after emergency surgery, according to results of a new study by researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine. The researchers say their findings also add to evidence that symptoms of depression and postoperative delirium may be an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease, although those findings were not conclusive.

Newswise: Miller School Study Highlights Importance of Psychological Screening for Adolescents with Hearing Loss
Released: 3-May-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Miller School Study Highlights Importance of Psychological Screening for Adolescents with Hearing Loss
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

A new study led by a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researcher underscores the importance of screening adolescents with hearing loss for depression and anxiety.

Released: 3-May-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Stress and mental health problems during first COVID-19-lockdown
University of Zurich

Many people in Switzerland experienced considerable psychological distress during the first COVID-19 lockdown from mid-March to the end of April 2020.

Released: 3-May-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Need to vent? Turn to real-life support, not social media
Michigan State University

Social media may make it easier for people to engage online, but I does not provide certain benefits of real-life human interactions, says a Michigan State University researcher.

Released: 3-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
College athletes in supportive programs coping better with pandemic, study shows
University of Kansas

Like much of society, college athletics were thrown into disarray by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: Large Study Analyzes Two Different Classes of ADHD Drugs in Preschool-Age Children
3-May-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Large Study Analyzes Two Different Classes of ADHD Drugs in Preschool-Age Children
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

In a multi-institutional study, researchers in the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Research Network (DBPNet), led by Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), have conducted the first and largest analysis to date comparing the effectiveness and side effects of stimulants like methylphenidate (Ritalin) and alpha-adrenergic agonists like guanfacine (Tenex) in preschool-age children. The researchers found that both classes of drugs have benefits, with differing side effects, suggesting that decisions on which class of drugs to prescribe should be made based on individual patient factors. The retrospective study was published today in JAMA.

Newswise: Hackensack Meridian Hackensack University Medical Center Establishes Comprehensive ALS Center
Released: 3-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Hackensack Meridian Hackensack University Medical Center Establishes Comprehensive ALS Center
Hackensack Meridian Health

Hackensack Meridian Hackensack University Medical Center has established an interprofessional Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Center which brings together all of the specialists a patient and family may need in one clinic, during one visit. The new ALS Center is the second such program in the Hackensack Meridian Health network, the other being at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center.

Newswise: Rutgers Champion of Student Health and Wellness is Retiring
Released: 3-May-2021 9:45 AM EDT
Rutgers Champion of Student Health and Wellness is Retiring
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

When Melodee Lasky joined Rutgers University 19 years ago, behavioral and mental health services were scattered across the individual colleges with little coordination. Psychiatry and the Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program were part of student health, but counseling services were separated and college-affiliated. Lasky, a physician who recognized the connection between physical and emotional wellness, recommended that mental and behavioral health be integrated within the framework of student health. That led to the creation of CAPS – Counseling, Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program & Psychiatric Services – a program that helps about 4,500 students each year.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Vaccine Hesitancy, Misinformation, Climate Change, Work After COVID: Topics included in the 2021 APS Virtual Convention
Association for Psychological Science

Many of the world’s leading psychological scientists and educators will explore the latest discoveries and discuss emerging societal concerns at the Association for Psychological Science (APS) 2021 Virtual Convention, 26-27 May.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 12:20 PM EDT
When does the green monster of jealousy wake up in people?
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Adult heterosexual women and men are often jealous about completely different threats to their relationship.

Newswise: Quality Improvement Project Boosts Depression Screening Among Cancer Patients
Released: 29-Apr-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Quality Improvement Project Boosts Depression Screening Among Cancer Patients
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – April 28, 2021 – Depression screening among cancer patients improved by 40 percent to cover more than 90 percent of patients under a quality improvement program launched by a multidisciplinary team at UT Southwestern Medical Center and Southwestern Health Resources.

Newswise: PsychLight Sensor to Enable Discovery of New Psychiatric Drugs
Released: 28-Apr-2021 12:35 PM EDT
PsychLight Sensor to Enable Discovery of New Psychiatric Drugs
UC Davis Health

UC Davis researchers develop PsychLight, a sensor that could be used in discovering new treatments for mental illness, in neuroscience research and to detect drugs of abuse.

Newswise: Pandemic worsened many older adults’ mental health and sleep, poll finds, but long-term resilience also seen
28-Apr-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Pandemic worsened many older adults’ mental health and sleep, poll finds, but long-term resilience also seen
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Nearly one in five older adults say their mental health has gotten worse since the pandemic began in March 2020, and an equal percentage say their sleep has suffered in that time too. More than 1 in 4 say they’re more anxious or worried than before the COVID-19 era, according to a new poll of people age 50 to 80.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 10:00 AM EDT
CHOP Researchers Demonstrate How Dynamic Changes in Early Childhood Development May Lead to Changes in Autism Diagnosis
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers found that difficulties in diagnosing toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) might be due to the dynamic nature of the disorder during child development. Children with clinical characteristics that put them on the diagnostic border of autism have an increased susceptibility to gaining or losing that diagnosis at later ages.

Newswise: Large Number of Americans Reported Financial Anxiety and Stress Even Before the Pandemic
28-Apr-2021 9:40 AM EDT
Large Number of Americans Reported Financial Anxiety and Stress Even Before the Pandemic
George Washington University

A substantial number of adults in the United States between the ages of 21 and 62 felt anxiety and stress about their personal finances well before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new report published today by the Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center at the George Washington University.

Newswise: Par une nouvelle dénomination: Améliorer l'accès aux soins et réduire les stigmas des crises psychogènes non épileptiques
Released: 27-Apr-2021 5:10 PM EDT
Par une nouvelle dénomination: Améliorer l'accès aux soins et réduire les stigmas des crises psychogènes non épileptiques
International League Against Epilepsy

Comme l'épilepsie, les crises non épileptiques psychogènes (CNEP) ont des conséquences sur la scolarisation, l'emploi et l'autonomie.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Men's loneliness linked to an increased risk of cancer
University of Eastern Finland

A recent study by the University of Eastern Finland shows that loneliness among middle-aged men is associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Newswise: Comment nommer les crises non-épileptiques psychogènes?
Released: 27-Apr-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Comment nommer les crises non-épileptiques psychogènes?
International League Against Epilepsy

Le fait de changer le nom des crises psychogènes non épileptiques pourrait-il conduire à une meilleure communication médecin-patient, à une meilleure compréhension et à moins de stigmatisation?

Released: 27-Apr-2021 9:45 AM EDT
EHR Usability Issues Linked to Nurse Burnout and Patient Outcomes
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR) has investigated associations between EHR usability and nurse job outcomes (burnout, job dissatisfaction, and intention to leave) and surgical patient outcomes (inpatient mortality and 30-day readmission).

Newswise: ToddBraverRecord-300x200.jpg
Released: 26-Apr-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Sum of incentives dictate efforts
Washington University in St. Louis

People rarely have just one motivation to do something. New research from the lab of Todd Braver at Washington University in St. Louis suggests how, and where, they combine.

Newswise: Identification of Psychological Risk Factors in Orthopaedic Trauma Patients Could Improve Post-Injury Planning
Released: 26-Apr-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Identification of Psychological Risk Factors in Orthopaedic Trauma Patients Could Improve Post-Injury Planning
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

Musculoskeletal injuries comprise a large percentage of hospital admissions for adults and often lead to chronic pain and long-term disability. A new review article published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons® (JAAOS®) recognizes the intimate connection between patients who sustain traumatic orthopaedic injuries and their subsequent psychological effects. The results suggest opportunity to improve overall patient health by attending to psychological and social concerns, along with physical health.

Released: 26-Apr-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Women with gynecologic cancer and low income report increased financial stress and anxiety during COVID-19 pandemic
Wiley

A recent study provides insights on the COVID-19 pandemic's effects on employment, anxiety, and financial distress among women who have gynecologic cancer and low income.

Newswise: Justice vs. fairness: Supervisors focused on others’ needs get ‘benefit of the doubt’ from employees, study shows
Released: 26-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Justice vs. fairness: Supervisors focused on others’ needs get ‘benefit of the doubt’ from employees, study shows
University of Notre Dame

In the workplace, whether or not we believe that a supervisor has treated us fairly depends on a number of factors, including motive, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Medicine Mental Health Experts Available for Interviews Following Trial Verdict in Death of George Floyd
Released: 21-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Medicine Mental Health Experts Available for Interviews Following Trial Verdict in Death of George Floyd
Johns Hopkins Medicine

The outcome of the highly sensitive trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd can cause many different emotions for people. Last May, Floyd’s death sparked a societal reckoning that prompted protests against racial injustice and police brutality. Demonstrations also took place following the jury’s decision on April 20. How can adults cope with their emotions following the verdict as well as help their children cope?

Released: 20-Apr-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Study Links Delirium to Hospitalized Older Adults with Acute Heart Failure Mortality
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A possible link between delirium and mortality in hospitalized older adults with acute heart failure exacerbation has been found by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Newswise: How Racial Violence Affects Black Americans' Mental Health
Released: 20-Apr-2021 11:35 AM EDT
How Racial Violence Affects Black Americans' Mental Health
Washington University in St. Louis

Black Americans experience an increase in poor mental health days during weeks when two or more incidents of anti-Black violence occur and when national interest surrounding the events is higher, according to a new study.

Released: 20-Apr-2021 10:50 AM EDT
New Study Connects Late-Career Job Loss and Genetic Predisposition to Weight Fluctuation, Health Risks
University of Wisconsin-Madison

You can probably guess that losing a job late in life affects your finances and your mental health. But did you know that it can also affect your weight?

20-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Potential Advancements in Treatment of PTSD and PTSD-related Cardiovascular Disease
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

A new study reveals that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) genes within the amygdala—the brain region important for traumatic memory processing—express differently when the brain develops fearful memories, such as when people undergo traumatic stress. Researchers have found that medication may potentially be used as a pharmacological blockade of the angiotensin type 1 receptor, thereby improving components of fear memory as assessed by freezing behavior.

Newswise: CUR Psychology Division Announces 2021 Psychology Research Awardees
Released: 20-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
CUR Psychology Division Announces 2021 Psychology Research Awardees
Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR)

The Psychology Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research announces the 2021 recipients of its Psychology Research Awards. The recipients are undergraduate students conducting original psychological research, who receive awards of up to $500 per project.

20-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Light Therapy Helps Veterans Treated for Traumatic Brain Injury
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

A new study by researchers at the VA Portland Health Care System in Oregon found that augmenting traditional treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI) with morning bright light therapy (MBLT) improved physical and mental symptoms for participants. The team will present their work virtually at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2021.

20-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Depression Medication Could Also Protect Against Heart Disease
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

The antidepression drug duloxetine could be beneficial to patients with both depression and cardiovascular disease, according to new studies performed in human blood and in mice. Globally, more than 300 million people have depression, which comes with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

Released: 19-Apr-2021 5:40 PM EDT
Supplement treats schizophrenia in mice, restores healthy "dance" and structure of neurons
University of Tokyo

A simple dietary supplement reduces behavioral symptoms in mice with a genetic mutation that causes schizophrenia.

Released: 19-Apr-2021 5:05 PM EDT
Solving Laboratory Professional Burnout: How Personality Traits Can Better Recruit and Retain
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers study shows how understanding personality types in hiring aids in recruiting and retaining of laboratory personnel

Newswise: Delaying cardiovascular surgeries due to COVID-19 has serious psychological effects on patients, study finds
Released: 19-Apr-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Delaying cardiovascular surgeries due to COVID-19 has serious psychological effects on patients, study finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Postponing procedures during the pandemic sparked anxiety and fear among patients, with many concerned about dying of their conditions before getting surgery.

Newswise: New Research Focuses on a Growing Pandemic Problem — “Zoom Dysmorphia”
19-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
New Research Focuses on a Growing Pandemic Problem — “Zoom Dysmorphia”
American Academy of Dermatology

During the pandemic, there was a shift to remote work, and demand for video conferencing increased. Zoom estimates daily meeting participants grew from approximately 10 million in December 2019 to more than 300 million in April 2020. Board-certified dermatologists also reported a change with this increased use of video calls: a rise in the number of patients they’re seeing with negative self-perceptions.

Released: 19-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Videoconferences More Exhausting When Participants Don’t Feel Group Belonging
American Psychological Association (APA)

Videoconferences may be less exhausting if participants feel some sense of group belonging, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Newswise: Report shows mental health concerns rising among children and teens during the pandemic
Released: 19-Apr-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Report shows mental health concerns rising among children and teens during the pandemic
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

In addition to the physical health problems caused by the pandemic, there has been a heavy mental health toll from months of lockdown and upheaval - particularly for children and teens.

19-Apr-2021 7:00 AM EDT
Omega-3 supplements do double duty in protecting against stress
Ohio State University

A high daily dose of an omega-3 supplement may help slow the effects of aging by suppressing damage and boosting protection at the cellular level during and after a stressful event, new research suggests.

Newswise: With virtual meetings here to stay, experts give tips on ways to bring some humanity back to our screens
Released: 16-Apr-2021 1:20 PM EDT
With virtual meetings here to stay, experts give tips on ways to bring some humanity back to our screens
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Sitting in small offices, big conference rooms, or giant auditoriums to collaborate with colleagues has been replaced by little squares on computer screens. Family pets, the doorbell, and children sometimes vie for attention, and if you want to take a bite of food, you turn off the camera. For better or worse, the way we meet has been forever changed as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. But experts at UTHealth think there are some easy things to do so all of these virtual experiences don't lead to burnout and fatigue.

Released: 16-Apr-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Older Adults More Likely to Make the Effort to Help Others
Association for Psychological Science

Does getting older impact our willingness to offer a helping hand, or does being older simply mean we have more resources and therefore more capacity to offer help when needed? New research suggests that, all things being equal, older adults are more likely to offer help than younger adults.

Released: 15-Apr-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Water crisis took toll on Flint adults’ physical, mental health
Cornell University

Since state austerity policies initiated a potable water crisis seven years ago in Flint, Michigan, public health monitoring has focused on potential developmental deficits associated with lead exposure in adolescents or fetuses exposed in utero.


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