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Article ID: 712613

Snapshot: New Video Highlights One of S&T’s Most Successful Technologies for Law Enforcement

Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

The Electronic Recovery and Access to Data (ERAD) Prepaid Card Reader is currently being used by state and local law enforcement in 48 states, by federal law enforcement agencies, and by international law enforcement agencies.

Released:
8-May-2019 4:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 712483

Security Cameras in Nursing Homes Aim to Protect the Vulnerable but Present Ethical Dilemmas

University of Washington

With reports of crimes against nursing home residents gaining media attention around the country, seven states have passed laws regulating the use of cameras in care facilities. An assistant professor in the University of Washington School of Social Work outlines the list of legal and moral issues that surveillance raises.

Released:
7-May-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 712146

Snapshot: S&T’s Immersive Imaging System's High-Resolution Images & 360-degree Coverage, Provides Full Scene Situational Awareness

Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

S&T’s Immersive Imaging System was recognized at the recent annual R&D 100 Conference among the 100 most exceptional innovations in science and technology from 2018.

Released:
30-Apr-2019 2:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 712064

FSU researcher finds hate crimes committed by groups hurt the most

Florida State University

Brendan Lantz, an assistant professor in the FSU College of Criminology and Criminal Justice, found that co-offending, or committing a crime with others, was significantly related to increased chances of serious injury regardless of the motivation behind the crime.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 712062

Poor People Pay For Criminal Justice System, Rutgers Study Finds

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Major criminal justice reforms such as removing mandatory fines, providing relief for poor defendants and assessing the ability to pay would go far in correcting a criminal justice system that punishes low-income people, a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study finds.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 711988

Justice Systems Fail to Help 1.5 Billion People Resolve Their Justice Problems, New Global Report Finds

New York University

Justice systems fail to resolve justice problems for 1.5 billion people, finds a new report by the Task Force on Justice. The report, released today at the World Justice Forum in The Hague, points to a hidden epidemic of injustice that affects all countries but hits the poorest hardest.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 711742

Study: Millennials Arrested More Often Than Their Predecessors—Even When Fewer Crimes Are Committed

Johns Hopkins University

Millennials are more likely to be arrested than their predecessor counterparts regardless of self-reported criminal activity, finds a new study by a Johns Hopkins University expert. Furthermore, black men who self-reported no offenses were 419% more likely to be arrested at the beginning of the 21st century than non-offending blacks of the previous generation, and 31.5% more likely to be arrested than whites of the same generation who did not self-report any crimes.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 6:00 AM EDT

Law and Public Policy


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