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NSU Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, Nova Southeastern University, Brian Walker Ph.D., Coral Reefs, Anchorage, Port Miami, Coral Reef Protection

South Florida Coral Reefs to Get a Helping Hand – Anchorage Changed to Help Avoid Mishaps

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To help protect coral reefs, NSU researchers helped identify new anchorage area for Port Miami

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Phytoremediation, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Ames, University of Washington, Trichloroethylene, TCE, poplar tree

Probiotics Help Poplar Trees Clean Up Toxins in Superfund Sites

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Biologists conducted the first large-scale experiment on a Superfund site using poplar trees fortified with a probiotic — or natural microbe — to clean up groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene, or TCE.

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Environment, urban agriculture, Urban Air Pollution, tree cover, Trees Urbanization Ozone

WVU Completes Study Estimating Urban Forests Provide More Than $59 Million in Ecosystem Services

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Urban forests capture pollutants, store carbons and have other significant benefits that can be quantified

Science

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Northern Arizona University, Center for Ecosystem Science and Society, Christopher Schwalm, Deborah Huntzinger, George Koch, Kiona Ogle, land carbon sink, Drought, Climate Science, Climate Change, Ecosystem, carbon dioxide (CO2)

Climate Scientist’s Study, Published in Nature, Finds More Frequent Droughts May Endanger Land Carbon Sink

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In a new paper published in Nature, Research Assistant Professor Christopher Schwalm of NAU’s Center for Ecosystem Science and Society (Ecoss) shares the results of a study investigating the impact of more frequent droughts on ecosystem resiliency—and how this phenomenon could endanger the land carbon sink.

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Phenology, Grassland, Prairie, Plant Science, Iowa State University, Climate, Climate Change

New Study Tracks Nonnative Plant Species in Timing of Grassland Green-Up

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The introduction of exotic, nonnative plant species to U.S. grasslands has led to changes in prairie phenology, or the timing of seasonal changes. A new study from an Iowa State University scientist details the magnitude of those changes.

Science

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Climate Change Garden, Climate Change, Cornell Botanic Gardens, Horticulture, Agriculture, Sonja Skelly

Climate Change Gardens Brings Plants Back to the Future

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Plots of foliage thicken in Cornell University’s Climate Change Demonstration Garden. Located at the Cornell Botanic Gardens, these raised beds provide a living illustration of how future temperature conditions may affect plants.

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Kansas State University, K-State, KSU, Keith Gido, fish, Aquatic, Streams, Drought, Ecology, Groundwater

Fish Out of Water: Loss of 350 Miles of Great Plains Streams Causing Changes in Aquatic Food Web

A decrease in Great Plains streams, fed by decreasing ground water, is changing fish assembles according to research published Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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bats, Climate Change, Endangered Animals, endangered bats, Endangered Species, Spain, Portugal, Europe, UK, Conservation, Ecology

Climate Change Could Put Rare Bat Species at Greater Risk

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An endangered bat species with a UK population of less than 1,000 could be further threatened by the effects of global warming, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

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Nature Communications, Flowers, Evolution, flowering plants, Charles Darwin, an abominable mystery, Juerg Schoenenberger, Hervé Sauquet, earliest flowers, revonstruction

What Flowers Looked Like 100 Million Years Ago

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Flowering plants with at least 300,000 species are by far the most diverse group of plants on Earth. They include almost all the species used by people for food, medicine, and many other purposes. However, flowering plants arose only about 140 million years ago, quite late in the evolution of plants, toward the end of the age of the dinosaurs, but since then have diversified spectacularly. No one knows exactly how this happened, and the origin and early evolution of flowering plants and especially their flowers still remains one of the biggest enigmas in biology, almost 140 years after Charles Darwin called their rapid rise in the Cretaceous "an abominable mystery". A new study, coordinated by Juerg Schoenenberger from the University of Vienna and Hervé Sauquet of the Université Paris-Sud and published in "Nature Communications" reconstructs the evolution of flowers and sheds new light on what the earliest flowers might have looked like.

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Earth Likely to Warm More Than 2 Degrees This Century

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A new UW statistical study shows only 5 percent chance that Earth will warm less than 2 degrees, what many see as a "tipping point" for climate, by the end of this century.







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