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Marijuana Weight Gain, Climate Change and Floods, Alcoholism Predictors, and More Top Stories 1 July 2015

Other topics include; do x-rays really cause cancer? And more.

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A Focus on Fungi

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Mia Maltz, a doctoral candidate in ecology & evolutionary biology at UC Irvine, is trying to determine how what happens underground, at the root level, can enhance habitat restoration efforts. Maltz’s focus is on fungi, specifically a type called mycorrhiza (“myco” meaning fungus, and “rhiza” meaning root) that invades plant root systems. She is discovering that using this fungi can produce more robust plants.

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Trending Stories Report for 19 June 2015

Topics include: treating advanced skin cancer, big data and bioenergy, cancer research, 10 reasons to eat quinoa, sleep issues in the nursing field, advances in cancer surgery, genes for sleep, brain receptor for cocaine addiction, and nano imaging on insect adaptations.

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Flies Released to Attack Hemlock-Killing Pest

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A team of scientists have shown that two species of silver flies from the Pacific Northwest will attack and eat hemlock woolly adelgid, the pest responsible for killing millions of hemlock trees in seventeen East Coast states. The team has released the flies, from Washington State, in experiments in Tennessee and New York, and early results look promising. If their experiment succeeds, these flies could help protect threatened eastern and Carolina hemlock trees.

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Surprisingly Few ‘Busy Bees’ Make Global Crops Grow

A major international study finds that surprisingly few bee species are responsible for pollinating the planet's crops: only two percent of wild bee species pollinate 80 percent of bee-pollinated crops worldwide.

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Smithsonian Snapshot: A Peony For Your Thoughts

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Her name is Bartzella, and she is something of a novelty and relative newcomer in the world of peonies. She definitely stands out among the other peonies in the Smithsonian’s Mary Livingston Ripley Garden in Washington, D.C. Her top distinction is the color of her petals: yellow.

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‘Vampire’ Plants Can Have Positive Impacts Up the Food Chain

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New research has revealed that parasitic ‘vampire’ plants that attach onto and derive nutrients from another living plant may benefit the abundance and diversity of surrounding vegetation and animal life.

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Bee Warned – Study Finds Pesticides Threaten Native Pollinators

A new Cornell study of New York state apple orchards finds that pesticides harm wild bees, and fungicides labeled “safe for bees” also indirectly may threaten native pollinators.

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Leap of Faith Proves Pollination Can Be Honeybee Free

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A leap of faith in science is paying off at Cornell University's orchards in Ithaca, as researchers and managers celebrate a solid spring pollination season by native pollinators - not honeybees.

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Wichita State Researchers Discover Enormous Array of Bacteria on Common Bird; Could Have Agricultural Implications

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Wichita State University microbiology professor Mark Schneegurt and ornithology professor Chris Rogers have discovered that one of North America's most common migratory birds – the Dark-eyed Junco – carries on its feathers a remarkable diversity of plant bacteria, the greatest ever found on wild birds. And while many of these bacteria may be harmful to plants, the bacteria could also be of great benefit.