Feature Channels:

Nature

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Life on Terra Firma Began with an Invasion

MINTER-Modernarthropodtrackways.jpg

Scientists are now confident animal life on solid ground started with a few short bursts of marine creatures making the leap from the oceans. New research at the University of Portsmouth also paints a clear picture of how animals rapidly spread out and changed once they made the leap.

Science

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Conservation, LAND, Development, forest and wildlife ecology, Fish And Wildlife Service

Government Transparency Limited When It Comes to America’s Conserved Private Lands

Conservationeasement.JPG

A new study led by researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison examined why private-land conservation data is sometimes inaccessible and found that limited capacity within some federal agencies as well as laws prohibiting others from disclosing certain information are to blame.

Medicine

Channels:

Brain Network, Executive Function, teen brains, Adolescence, Youth

Penn Medicine Researchers Identify Brain Network Organization Changes That Influence Improvements in Executive Function Among Adolescents and Young Adults

SatterthwaiteBrainImage.jpg

In a new study, published this week in Current Biology, a team of University of Pennsylvania researchers report newly mapped changes in the network organization of the brain that underlie those improvements in executive function. The findings could provide clues about risks for certain mental illnesses.

Science

Channels:

South Sudan Wildlife Surviving Civil War, but Poaching and Trafficking Threats Increase

P1aerialviewofelephants.jpg

The first aerial assessment of the impact of South Sudan’s current civil war on the country’s wildlife and other natural resources shows that significant wildlife populations have so far survived, but poaching and commercial wildlife trafficking are increasing, as well as illegal mining, timber harvesting and charcoal production, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) said in a report issued today.

Science

Channels:

Parasitic plants , Mistletoe, Seed Dispersal, Enviornment, bird ecology, Puerto Rico

Mistletoe Research May Keep You Healthy

FruitingMistletoeCaraballo.JPG

A new study examines the spread of mistletoe—a parasitic plant—and finds that the plant’s success is determined not only by its compatibility with a host tree, but also whether or not the plants’ fruiting seasons overlap. Knowing what factors are necessary for the parasite to spread may help scientists better understand the variability of other parasitic interactions, including infectious diseases.

Science

Channels:

Wolves Need Space to Roam to Control Expanding Coyote Populations

graywolf.jpg

Wolves and other top predators need large ranges to be able to control smaller predators whose populations have expanded, according to a study appearing May 23 in Nature Communications. The results were similar across three continents, showing that as top predators' ranges were cut back and fragmented, they were no longer able to control smaller predators.

Science

Channels:

Flowers, Sunflower, Plant Biology, Evolurtion, Plant Genetics, Agriculatural

Sunflower Genome Sequence to Provide Roadmap for More Resilient Crops

University of Georgia researchers are part of an international team that has published the first sunflower genome sequence.

Science

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

New York Seascape, Sage Grouse Survival, Princess Pheromone, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on ecology and wildlife.

Science

Channels:

Fossils, Argentina, Flowers, Cornell University, History, Cretaceous Period, Paleocene epoch

Oldest Buckthorn Fossilized Flowers Found in Argentina

TwoFossilizedFlowers.jpg

Around 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, a giant asteroid crashed into the present-day Gulf of Mexico, leading to the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs. How plants were affected is less understood, but fossil records show that ferns were the first plants to recover many thousands of years afterward. Now, a team including Cornell researchers reports the discovery of the first fossilized flowers from South America, and perhaps the entire Southern Hemisphere, following the extinction event

Science

Channels:

Climate Change, atmospheric warming, Biomass Production, Tibetan Plateau, species synchrony

Rising Temperatures Threaten Stability of Tibetan Alpine Grasslands

ExperimentSite_1.jpg

A warming climate could affect the stability of alpine grasslands in Asia’s Tibetan Plateau, threatening the ability of farmers and herders to maintain the animals that are key to their existence, and potentially upsetting the ecology of an area in which important regional river systems originate.







Chat now!