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New Study Identifies Promising Treatment for Military Veterans with PTSD

Attention control training reduces attention bias variability, improves PTSD symptoms

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Genetic Tug of War in the Brain Influences Behavior

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Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine report that a nuanced, targeted version of parental control over gene expression, is the method of choice over classic genomic imprinting. Published in Cell Reports, so-called noncanonical imprinting is particularly prevalent in the brain, and skews the genetic message in subpopulations of cells so that mom, or dad, has a stronger say. The mechanism can influence offspring behavior, and because it is observed more frequently than classic imprinting, appears to be preferred.

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Pharmacy Expenditures for Children With Serious Chronic Illness

In an analysis of expenditures for outpatient pharmacy products used by publicly insured children with serious chronic illness in California, treating hemophilia accounted for about 40 percent of expenditures but included just 0.4 percent of the group studied, suggesting a need to improve pricing for this and other effective yet high-cost medications, according to a study in the July 28 issue of JAMA.

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Six Hand Washing Tips to Help Protect Your Family

As the beginning of the school year approaches, parents need to remind their children about the importance of hand washing. Every day people touch several surfaces including books, desks, door knobs, sink handles, and other people and many of them harbor germs like bacteria and viruses that can cause illnesses.

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Study May Show a Way to Predict Whether Children with a Genetic Disorder Will Develop Autism or Psychosis

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Findings are the first to shed light on the genetic differences between DiGeorge syndrome patients with autism and those with psychosis.

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Research Links Premature Birth to Withdrawn Personality

New research indicates that adults born very premature are more likely to be socially withdrawn and display signs of autism.

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Apartment Owners See Benefits to Going Smoke-Free

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A survey of 324 multiunit owners/operators in South Dakota showed that adopting those policies reduced maintenance costs while improving safety. The research was a collaborative project involving nursing researchers at South Dakota State University and the South Dakota Department of Health. State tobacco control officials have developed materials to help more apartment owners institute voluntary smoke-free policies.

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Clutter in Its New Form: ‘Digital Debris’ Is Spilling Over into the Physical, Says Baylor Design Historian

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When it comes to clutter, the technological is increasingly crossing over into physical space, says a Baylor University interior design expert.

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Is Facebook Use Always Associated with Poorer Body Image and Risky Dieting?

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College women who are more emotionally invested in Facebook and have lots of Facebook friends are less concerned with body size and shape and less likely to engage in risky dieting behaviors. But that’s only if they aren’t using Facebook to compare their bodies to their friends’ bodies, according to the authors of a surprising new study at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.

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Poverty’s Most Insidious Damage Is to a Child’s Brain

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A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the brain. In an accompanying editorial, child psychiatrist Joan L. Luby, MD, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, writes that “early childhood interventions to support a nurturing environment for these children must now become our top public health priority for the good of all.”