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Life

Law and Public Policy

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Nations’ Policies Affect Mothers’ Ability to Balance Work-Family Life, Study Shows

Various Western nations’ work-family policies leave many working mothers feeling unsupported as both caretakers and workers, according to a comparative study of working mothers in multiple countries by The University of Texas at Austin.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Women More Likely Than Men to Initiate Divorces, But Not Non-Marital Breakups

Women are more likely than men to initiate divorces, but women and men are just as likely to end non-marital relationships, according to a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Veterans Live in More Diverse Neighborhoods Than Their Civilian Counterparts of Same Race

When members of the U.S. military leave the service, they tend to settle in neighborhoods with greater overall diversity than their civilian counterparts of the same race, according to a new study.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Study Uses 311 Complaints to Track Where and When Neighborhood Conflict Emerges

In a new study from New York University (NYU) using 311 complaint data, researchers tracked when and where New Yorkers complain about their neighbors making noise, blocking driveways, or drinking in public.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Mothers Give More Than They Receive When Family Struck by Major Illness

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Mothers provide more support to adult children with a serious health condition than to their other children, according to new research from Iowa State University. It’s a situation that can put older mothers in a vulnerable position.

Science

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Lice in at Least 25 States Show Resistance to Common Treatments

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The start of the school year means new classes, new friends, homework and sports. It also brings the threat of head lice. Scientists report today that lice populations in at least 25 states have developed resistance to over-the-counter treatments still widely recommended by doctors and schools. The researchers are presenting their work today at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

Medicine

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Vitamin D Supplements Could Help Reduce Falls in Homebound Elderly

Every year falls affect approximately one in three older adults living at home, with approximately one in 10 falls resulting in serious injury. Even if an injury does not occur, the fear of falling can lead to reduced activity and a loss of independence. Research has shown that vitamin D plays a key role in maintaining muscle integrity and strength and some studies suggest vitamin D may reduce the risk of falls.

Science

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Glass Paint Could Keep Metal Roofs and Other Structures Cool Even on Sunny Days (Video) 


Sunlight can be brutal. It wears down even the strongest structures, including rooftops and naval ships, and it heats up metal slides and bleachers until they’re too hot to use. To fend off damage and heat, scientists have developed an environmentally friendly paint out of glass that bounces sunlight off metal surfaces — keeping them cool and durable. The researchers present their work at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Stepchildren Who View Former Stepparents as ‘Family’ Maintain Relationships Following Divorce

Researchers found stepchildren’s views of former stepparents depended on emotional reactions to the divorce, patterns of support or resource exchanges, and parental encouragement or discouragement to continue step-relationships. Whether stepchildren maintained relationships with their former stepparents largely depended on whether stepchildren viewed their former stepparents as family, the researchers found.

Medicine

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Viruses Thrive in Big Families, in Sickness and in Health

A study led by the University of Utah School of Medicine finds that every child puts a household at increased risk for viral infections. Childless households had infections during 3-4 weeks of the year, while families with six children were infected for 45 weeks. But only half who tested positive reported feeling ill. Published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, the results can help families and health care providers know when illness should be cause for concern.