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Medicine

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Empty Nest Syndrome, Empty Nest, College, Psychology, UCLA, UCLA health, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Depression, Anxiety

For Parents, ‘Empty Nest’ Is Emotional Challenge

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While “empty nest syndrome” is not a formal clinical diagnosis or a confirmed mental health disorder listed in the official Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, most psychiatrists agree it’s a legitimate emotional moment when a young adult leaves home and the parents are faced with an empty bedroom—and silence.

Medicine

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Exercise, Caffeine, Stairs, Office, Health, Health & Wellness

Tired? Try Walking Up Stairs Instead of Caffeine

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Research from the University of Georgia shows that 10 minutes of walking up and down stairs was more likely to make participants feel energized than ingesting 50 milligrams of caffeine.

Medicine

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brown recluse

Children at Greater Risk for Complications From Brown Recluse Spider Bites

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Medical complications of brown recluse spider bites are uncommon but they can be severe, particularly in children, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) reported today.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Therapy, Family, Marriage, Marriage and Family Therapy

The Therapy Juggling Act

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When things are up in the air, marriage and family therapists help you spot what is about to fall. UNLV's Katherine Hertlein on being an agent for social change.

Medicine

Science

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fire departments, firefighting stress, firefighting cardiovascular health

Firefighting and the Heart: Implications for Prevention

Denise Smith, professor of health and exercise sciences at Skidmore College, recently co-authored a study titled, “Firefighting and the Heart: Implications for Prevention.” The study was featured in the scientific journal, Circulation.

Medicine

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Atv Related Injury

ATV-Related Injuries in Children Remain Large Public Health Problem

All-terrain vehicle-related injuries remain a large public health problem in this country, with children more adversely affected than adults. According to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, the major risk factors for young riders also are entirely preventable.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Married LGBT Older Adults Are Healthier, Happier Than Singles, Study Finds

Same-sex marriage has been the law of the land for nearly two years — and in some states for even longer — but researchers can already detect positive health outcomes among couples who have tied the knot, a University of Washington study finds.

Medicine

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Flame Retardants, Endocrinology, papillary thyroid cancer, Home Products, Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals, ENDO 2017, Thyroid Cancer, thyroid cancer research, Endocrine Society, Toxicology

Exposure to Common Flame Retardants May Raise the Risk of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

Some flame retardants used in many home products appear to be associated with the most common type of thyroid cancer, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), according to a new study being presented Saturday at the Endocrine Society’s 99th annual meeting, ENDO 2017, in Orlando, Fla.

Science

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Archaeology, Anthropology, hunter-gatherer, Domestication, Jordan Valley, Maasai, mice

Mouse in the House Tells Tale of Human Settlement

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Long before the advent of agriculture, hunter-gatherers began putting down roots in the Middle East, building more permanent homes and altering the ecological balance in ways that allowed the common house mouse to flourish, new research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates.Findings suggest the roots of animal domestication go back to human sedentism thousands of years prior to what has long been considered the dawn of agriculture.

Medicine

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medication disposal, Medication Safety, poison center, Poison Control

Blue Ridge Poison Center Provides Tips on Safe Medication Disposal

In 2015, nearly 57 percent of all poison exposure cases nationwide involved prescription or over-the-counter medicines.  So during National Poisoning Prevention Week, the Blue Ridge Poison Center at University of Virginia Health System is encouraging people to keep all medicines stored out of the sight and reach of children, read labels carefully before giving or taking any medicine, and to check their home for expired or unused medicines and dispose of them properly.







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