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Science

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Cow Gene Study Shows Why Most Clones Fail

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It has been 20 years since Dolly the sheep was successfully cloned in Scotland, but cloning mammals remains a challenge. A new study by researchers from the U.S. and France of gene expression in developing clones now shows why most cloned embryos likely fail.

Science

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Wind Power, Wind Energy, Wind Turbines, Turbines, Agronomy, Agriculture, CORN, Soybean, Iowa

Wind Turbines May Have Beneficial Effects for Crops, According to Iowa State University Research

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Turbulence created by wind turbines may help corn and soybeans by influencing variables such as temperature and carbon dioxide concentration, according to Iowa State University research. The project drew on data generated by research towers set up on a 200-turbine wind farm in Iowa.

Science

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sow nutrition, gestating sows, precision feeding recommendations, National Research Council, amino acid requirements, Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, South Dakota State University

Producing Healthier Piglets by Meeting Pregnant Sows' Nutritional Needs

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Precisely meeting a pregnant sow’s protein needs, specifically amino acid requirements, will improve the health of the sow and piglet—and help protect the environment by utilizing resources wisely.

Science

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Archaelology, Beans, Nutrition, Levantine Archaeology, Boaretto

Hunting the Wild Fava

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The wild faba – today, fava – bean is believed to be extinct. Dr. Elisabeth Boaretto has identified the oldest known faba beans – about 14,000 years old. Understanding how the wild fabas survived can help scientists grow hardier fava crops today. Favas are a major source of nutrition in many parts of the world

Science

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soil, Ecosystem, Critical Zone, vadose zone

Critical Zone, Critical Research

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The critical zone extends from the top of the tallest tree down through the soil and into the water and rock beneath it. It stops at what’s called the weathering zone — or where soils first begin to develop. This zone allows crops to grow well and supports our buildings. It also allows for animals and microbes to live, and filters our water. A review of recent research is now available.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Food Security, global food, global food solutions, KSU, Kansas State, Kansas State University, K-State

Finding Food Solutions: Kansas State University Graduate Student to Study Food Insecurity in Ireland

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Miranda Klugesherz, graduate student in communication studies, will research global solutions to food insecurity through the George J. Mitchell Scholarship, a national, competitive scholarship program of the US-Ireland Alliance.

Business

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milk, LED Lights, Led Lighting

New LED Display Lights Help Improve Taste of Milk, Virginia Tech Researchers Find

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“We want to help figure out ways to return to the fresh taste of milk that our grandparents experienced when it came straight from the dairy,” said Susan Duncan, a professor of food science and technology.

Science

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bioenergy crops, agave, crassulacean acid metabolism, CAM, Photosynthesis, Climate Change, water-use efficiency, drought-resistant crops, genetic behavior, Molecular Biology

New Study of Water-Saving Plants Advances Efforts to Develop Drought-Resistant Crops

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As part of an effort to develop drought-resistant food and bioenergy crops, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered the genetic and metabolic mechanisms that allow certain plants to conserve water and thrive in semi-arid climates.

Medicine

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Baking, Holidays

UF/IFAS Extension Agent: Baking Blunders to Avoid This Holiday

Heidi Copeland, family and consumer sciences agent with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension Leon County, has these tips for avoiding common baking blunders during the holidays.

Science

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Lakes, Limnology, Pollution, Agriculture, Runoff, Weather

Study Shows Many Lakes Getting Murkier, but Gives Hope for Improvement

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A study of more than 5,000 Wisconsin lakes shows that nearly a quarter of them have become murkier in the past two decades. It also shows this trend could get worse as a changing climate leads to increased precipitation.

Science

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soil, Foundation, Construction, Building, Infrastructure

Building From the Ground Up

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The wise person builds on a solid foundation. The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) December 1st Soils Matter blog post explains what goes into deciding soil’s suitability for a construction project.

Science

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CORN, Fertilizer, Agriculture, soil nutrients, Economic

The Economy of Cold Soil Blues

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For many farmers, in-furrow starter application is a cheaper alternative to other starter fertilizers. New research suggests it does not provide an economic benefit in most situations, however.

Science

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Veterinary Medicine, Cattle Disease, Ruminant, Campylobacter Jejuni, Campylobacter

Iowa State University Researchers Detail What Makes Costly Ruminant Bacteria So Infectious

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An Iowa State University veterinary research team has discovered the specific genetic mutations that make Campylobacter jejuni such a virulent strain of bacteria in ruminant animals such as sheep and cattle. The research could lead to a vaccine or new ways to control the bacteria.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Saving Lives: Kansas State University Helps Provide Trucks, Equipment for Rural Fire Departments

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The Kansas Forest Service, which is housed at Kansas State University, provides trucks and equipment for rural fire departments.

Science

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Beetles, Invasive Species, Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle, Vegetation, Hawaii, coconut palms, John S. Allen, University of Hawaii , 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Acoustical Society of America, ASA

Using Sound to Stop Destructive Beetles in Their Tracks

What would the paradise of Hawaii be without swaying coconut palms, with succulent fruit that is almost synonymous with the tropical island? Unfortunately, that may be the future of the island unless scientists find some way to stop the destructive Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle which feeds on the coconut palms, stripping them of their leaves and decimating the vegetation. A team of researchers at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu are using acoustics to help to understand this beetle, its habits and movements in order to protect the state’s valuable natural resources.

Science

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Kansas State University, K-State, KSU, Kansas State, Vara Prasad, Prasad, Agronomy, Agriculture, Crops, feed the future, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Sustainable Intensification, Aaas, American Association For The Advancement Of Science

Kansas State University Agronomist Vara Prasad Selected as AAAS Fellow

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The American Association for the Advancement of Science is honoring Vara Prasad, Kansas State University distinguished professor of agronomy, as one of its 2016 fellows.

Science

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CORN, corn production, Crop Production, corn stalk, Plant Growth, Plant Science, Mechanical Engineering, Douglas Cook, Roger Elmore, Justin McMechan, New York University, University Of Nebraska, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

Can You Hear the Corn Grow? Yes!

Corn is the leading grain crop in the U.S. but a lack of understanding about the mechanics involved in wind-induced corn stalk failure has hindered further improvements in corn production. Now, by applying mechanical engineering tools and techniques, a group of engineers and plant scientists are making headway addressing this problem. The work will be presented at the 172nd ASA meeting.

Science

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soil, soil quality, Equation, natural resource management

Writing an Equation for Soil Success

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Assessing soil physical quality can save time and money. It can help steer away from soils that wouldn’t help crops grow their best. Researchers have combined this information in a mathematical equation.

Science

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To Solve Deadly Cattle Disease, Ranchers Collaborate with UC Researchers at UC ANR Research Center

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After more than 60 years of working closely with University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources researchers to identify and learn how to manage a disease that causes the death of up to 90,000 calves annually, ranchers are optimistic that they are on the home stretch to getting a vaccine that will protect cattle.

Science

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Bioplastic, Bioplastics, Horticulture, Garden, Gardener, Enviroment, Environmental Research

Iowa State University Scientists Explore Environmental Advantages of Horticultural Bioplastics

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Bioplastic may offer gardeners a more sustainable alternative to petroleum-based pots and flats, according to Iowa State University research. Although more expensive to manufacture than conventional plastics, bioplastics someday may grow beyond a niche market, said ISU experts.







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