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Nutrient Protecting 'Peanut Brittle' for Cattle Receives Patent

A U.S. patent has been issued for a Kansas State University-developed "peanut brittle" that ensures cows and other livestock eating it get their vitamins.

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Business

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Technology Created at NDSU Licensed to c2sensor

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A technology developed at North Dakota State University, Fargo, creates precise in-the-ground measurement and monitoring of soil and crop conditions which could provide opportunities for greater yields. The technology also has led to a new start-up company. The c2sensor corp., based in the NDSU Technology Incubator, has concluded a license agreement with the NDSU Research Foundation (NDSU/RF) for the precision agriculture technology.

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Father-Son Research Team Discovers Cheatgrass Seeds Survive Wash Cycle

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SPOKANE, Washington – Not many sixth-graders can say they have been published in an academic journal, but Caleb Lefcort can cross that distinction off his list. Caleb got into a discussion with his father, Hugh Lefcort, professor of biology at Gonzaga University, as to whether the seed burrs from cheatgrass would survive the laundry cycle. Hugh believed the seeds would not survive. Instead of simply taking his father’s word for it, Caleb – who was in fourth grade at the time – suggested the scientific method: an experiment. What the researchers discovered surprised them.

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Medicine

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Epidemiologist Publishes Model on the Impact of a Regional Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak

A model developed by a Kansas State University epidemiologist and one of his former graduate student evaluates the impact and control of a potential outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in livestock.

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Ever Tried a "Laser Delicious" Apple?

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The ability to detect when to harvest “climacteric” fruits -- such as apples, bananas, pears and tomatoes -- at the precise moment to ensure “peak edibleness” in terms of both taste and texture may soon be within reach for farmers, thanks to the work of a team of researchers from Saint Joseph University in Lebanon and the Université de Bretagne Occidentale de Brest in France.

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Texas Tech’s Sequencing of Cotton A-Genome Could Revolutionize Industry

The accomplishment through collaboration with Bayer CropScience could translate into better commercial varieties for growers.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Nutrition, Safety Key To Consumer Acceptance of Nanotech, Genetic Modification In Foods

New research shows that the majority of consumers will accept the presence of nanotechnology or genetic modification (GM) technology in foods – but only if the technology enhances the nutrition or improves the safety of the food.

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Circumstances Are Right for Weed Invasion to Escalate, Researchers Say

What some farmers grow as pasture plants others view as weeds. But with the need to cheaply feed food animals rising, circumstances are right for the weed invasion to escalate.

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Grasshoppers Signal Slow Recovery of Post-Agricultural Woodlands, Study Finds

By comparing grasshoppers found at woodland sites once used for agriculture to similar sites never disturbed by farming, UW-Madison Philip Hahn and John Orrock show that despite decades of recovery, the numbers and types of species found in each differ, as do the understory plants and other ecological variables, like soil properties.

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Crops Play a Major Role in the Annual CO2 Cycle Increase

In a study published Wednesday, Nov. 19, in Nature, scientists at Boston University, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Michigan, the University of Minnesota, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and McGill University show that a steep rise in the productivity of crops grown for food accounts for as much as 25 percent of the increase in this carbon dioxide (CO2) seasonality.

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