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Optics Breakthrough to Revamp Night Vision

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A breakthrough by an Australian collaboration of researchers could make infra-red technology easy-to-use and cheap, potentially saving millions of dollars in defence and other areas using sensing devices, and boosting applications of technology to a host of new areas, such as agriculture.

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A Peachy Defense System for Seeds

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Don't eat the core, it's poisonous: it's something parents often say to their children before they eat their first peach. Peach pits, which are hidden inside the nut-like husk, do in fact contain amygdalin, a substance which can degrade into hydrogen cyanide in the stomach.

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A Rallying Call for Microbiome Science National Data Management

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Massive amounts of data require infrastructure to manage and store the information in a manner than can be easily accessed for use. In a paper published May 16, 2016 in Trends in Microbiology, DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers call for the formation of a National Microbiome Data Center to efficiently manage the datasets accumulated globally.

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Ivy’s Powerful Grasp Could Lead to Better Medical Adhesives, Stronger Battle Armor

English ivy’s natural glue might hold the key to new approaches to wound healing, stronger armor for the military and maybe even cosmetics with better staying power.

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Can Legumes Solve Environmental Issues?

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It's a win-win situation for the environment and the economy when it comes to introducing legumes into agricultural systems, says new research published in Frontiers in Plant Science, carried out by an international team of scientists as part of the European Union project, Legume Futures.

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5 Ways Scientists Can Make Soil Less Dirty

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A primer on 5 remediation methods scientists can use to pull contaminants out of soil and groundwater.

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Ambrosia Beetle Spreads Dangerous Avocado Pathogen

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As the laurel wilt pathogen casts a cloud over the $100-million-a-year Florida avocado industry, University of Florida researchers continue to look for clues to prevent the pathogen from spreading.

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Genetic Engineering Report Findings Supported by Crop, Agronomy Societies

The recent NAS report on genetically engineered crops aligns with statements from Agronomy and Crop Societies: Scientific research overwhelmingly shows GE crops are safe and pose no significant health or environmental risks.

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Hamburg, Shalala, Glickman, Angell Headline Food Law Conference at Georgetown University

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Former FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, Clinton Foundation President and former U.S. Secretary of Health Donna E. Shalala, former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman, and Sonia Angell, deputy commissioner for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene headline a unique conference focused on food issues, “Vote Food 2016: Better Food, Better Health,” on June 3 in Washington, DC.

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City of Second Chance Soils

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Once the world's largest steel working mill, Steelworkers Park in Chicago has become the proving grounds for rehabilitating unforgiving slag with biosolids and dredged sediments.

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Chance Finding Could Transform Plant Production: U of Guelph Study

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An almost entirely accidental discovery by University of Guelph researchers could transform food and biofuel production and increase carbon capture on farmland. By tweaking a plant’s genetic profile, the researchers doubled the plant’s growth and increased seed production by more than 400 per cent.

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Top Stories 5-17-2016

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Forest-Loving Moose Learning to Thrive on Farmland

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While populations of moose have been declining in much of their North American range, research from the University of Saskatchewan shows how these icons of the northern boreal forest are finding success by moving south into farmers’ fields.

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Protecting Sea Turtles, Juvenile Sea Stars, Wildfires to Increase in Alaska, and more in the Environment News Source

Protecting Sea Turtles, Juvenile Sea Stars, Wildfires to Increase in Alaska, and more in the Environment News Source

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New Study Shows Animal Welfare Initiatives Improves Feather Cover of Cage-Free Laying Hens

Recognised welfare outcome assessments within farm assurance schemes have shown a reduction in feather loss and improvement in the welfare of UK cage-free laying hens, according to the findings of a study from the AssureWel project by the University of Bristol, RSPCA and the Soil Association.

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Farms Have Become a Major Air-Pollution Source

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Emissions from farms outweigh all other human sources of fine-particulate air pollution in much of the United States, Europe, Russia and China, according to new research. The culprit: fumes from nitrogen-rich fertilizers and animal waste combine in the air with combustion emissions to form solid particles, which constitute a major source of disease and death, according to the new study.

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Left Uncontrolled, Weeds Would Cost Billions in Economic Losses Every Year

A team of experts from the Weed Science Society of America found that if weeds were allowed to grow with no control measures, about half of corn and soybean crops across the United States and Canada would be lost, costing growers about $43 billion annually. The team was led by Kansas State University agronomy professor, Anita Dille.

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How Does Water Move Through Soil?

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In the basic water cycle, water falls on the land in some type of precipitation (rain or snow). It either is soaked into the ground or runs off into a body of water – storm water or natural. Eventually, it returns to the atmosphere. But the story about water movement in soil is complex. Soil scientists call this topic “soil hydrology.” The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) May 15 Soils Matter blog post explains how soil texture, soil structure, and gravity influence water movement.

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Top Stories 5-16-2016

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Top Stories 5-13-2016

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