Feature Channels

Agriculture

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Protecting Food Crops From Soil Contaminants

View | Comment

Mohamed.jpg

Using natural soil components to trap pollutants will allow producers to control soil contaminants and reuse draining water while protecting their agricultural crops, according to Mohamed Elsayed, a Fulbright Postdoctoral Scholar at South Dakota State University’s chemistry and biochemistry department. His research seeks to increase the ability of humic acid to adsorb, or trap pollutants, in combination with either of two clay minerals—kaolinite or montmorillonite.

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Changing Climate Impacts Food Production

View | Comment

Science

Business

Channels:

Texas Crop, Weather for Feb. 24, 2015

View | Comment

Weekly summary of crop, livestock and weather conditions throughout Texas.

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Luring Deer Away From Livestock Feed with Fall Cover Crops

View | Comment

DSCF0308.JPG

During long Midwest winters, deer can wreak havoc on hay and other stored livestock feed. However, planting fall cover crops, such as clover, turnips and peas, may help wildlife managers provide deer with a nutrient-rich alternative that can lure them away from livestock feed. Distinguished professor Jonathan Jenks of the South Dakota State University Natural Resource Management Department is conducting a controlled experiment to identify which cover crops deer prefer.

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Study Finds Climate Change May Dramatically Reduce Wheat Production

View | Comment

A recent study involving Kansas State University researchers finds that in the coming decades at least one-quarter of the world's wheat production will be lost to extreme weather from climate change if no adaptation measures are taken.

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Study Finds Invasive Weed Kochia's Resistance to Well-Known Herbicide Stems From Increase in Gene Copies

View | Comment

A study finds that kochia has evolved to have multiple copies of a gene code that targets glyphosate, the most common herbicide. These copies enable the invasive weeds to survive the field rate of glyphosate applications.

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

‘Megadrought’ Likely for Western U.S. By End of Century

View

The consequences of climate change paint a bleak picture for the Southwest and much of America’s breadbasket, the Great Plains. A “megadrought” likely will occur late in this century, and it could last for three decades, according to a new report by Cornell University and NASA researchers in the journal Science Advances, published today.

Science

Business

Channels:

Keywords:

Unraveling the Complex Web of Global Food Trade

View | Comment

Growing global trade is critically important for providing food when and where it’s needed — but it makes it harder to link the benefits of food and the environmental burden of its production. A study published this week in the journal BioScience by an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment proposes to extend the way we characterize global food trade to include nutritional value and resource consumption alongside more conventional measures of trade’s value.

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Midwest Scientist Reports Improved Soil Conditions

View | Comment

daveimageDSC_2033.JPG

Tillage practices that conserve moisture, plants that use water more efficiently and soil with more organic matter have produced higher yields even in dry conditions, according to soil scientist David Clay, professor of plant science at South Dakota State University. In addition, scientists have a better understanding about how water stress decreases the plants’ ability to take up nutrients and recover from pest injury.

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Shade Coffee Is for the Birds

View

AfricanPygmyKingfisher1080663.jpg

The conservation value of growing coffee under trees instead of on open farms is well known, but hasn’t been studied much in Africa. So a University of Utah-led research team studied birds in the Ethiopian home of Arabica coffee and found that “shade coffee” farms are good for birds, but some species do best in forest.