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Science

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Typhoon Haiyan, Typhoon, Hurricane, Meteorology, Climate Change, Ocean, ocean salinity

Increasing Rainfall in a Warmer World Will Likely Intensify Typhoons in Western Pacific

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An analysis of the strongest tropical storms over the last half-century reveals that higher global temperatures have intensified the storms via enhanced rainfall. Rain that falls on the ocean reduces salinity and allows typhoons to grow stronger.

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Ocean, Hurricane, Climate, Meteorology

More Frequent Hurricanes Not Necessarily Stronger on Atlantic Coast

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Active Atlantic hurricane periods, like the one we are in now, are not necessarily a harbinger of more, rapidly intensifying hurricanes along the U.S. coast, according to new research performed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Science

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Flood, Flooding, Flood Risk, Rainfall, Climate Change, Global Warming, Precipitation, NASA, National Weather Service, U.S. Geological Survey, Hydrology

Flood Threats Changing Across US

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A University of Iowa study finds the threat of flooding is growing in the northern half of the United States and declining in the South. The findings are based on water-height measurements at 2,042 stream and rivers, compared to NASA data showing the amount of water stored in the ground.

Science

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smart cities, Cities, Environment, Urban, Hurricane Sandy, Renewable, green infrastructure, Sustainability, Disasters, malicious attacks, Engineering, Wireless, electrical and computer engineering, Rutgers, Rutgers University, RU, New Jersey, human-computer interaction, National Science Foundation, Psychology, cognitive psychology, Behavior, Infrastructure, Crit

Future ‘Smart Cities’ Should be Super-Connected, Green and Resilient

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When Superstorm Sandy lashed New Jersey in 2012, Narayan B. Mandayam lost power in his East Brunswick home for five days. Sandy sparked the Rutgers professor’s interest in helping to engineer smart cities, where everything is connected; renewable energy, green infrastructure and sustainability reign; and resilience after breakdowns, disasters and malicious attacks is critical.

Life

Education

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WIU GIS Students Participate in Building Tri-County 911 Network

This story outlines the role of WIU students in helping create a 911 network to cover some of the handful of counties in Illinois without 911 services.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Presidential Inauguration, Evacuation, Evacuation plans, Emergency Management, Traffic Engineering, traffic flow, Traffic

How Would Washington, D.C., Be Evacuated if a Disaster Occurs During Inauguration?

Washington, D.C., officials are likely finalizing the evacuation plan they would use if something went wrong during inauguration. Common mistakes in such plans are converting highways to one-way routes and having fewer lanes on exit roads, which creates bottlenecks.

Science

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Earthquake, Tsunami, Geology, Geophysics, Hazard mitigation

Lori Dengler, Tsunami, Earthquake, Geophysics, and Natural Hazard Mitigation Expert From Humboldt State University.

Science

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Climate Change Is Already Causing Widespread Local Extinction in Plant and Animal Species

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Extinctions related to climate change have already happened in hundreds of plant and animal species around the world. New research, publishing on December 8th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, shows that local extinctions have already occurred in 47% of the 976 plant and animal species studied.

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Calif. State U Channel Islands Coastal Environmental Expert Says 6.8 Humboldt Quake Is Call to Strengthen Coastal Infrastructure Now, Especially with Sea Level Rise.

Science

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Earthquake, California, San Andreas Fault, mega-quakes, UCERF3, Earthquake expert

Disaster Researcher Can Comment on Potential California Mega-Quake; Focuses on Evacuation Decision-Making and Response

Conducted reconnaissance field research

Science

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Disaster Relief, Urban Planning, Emergency Management, Sensors, air leakage, Home Energy Cost, rare earth magnet, Microscopy, Lignin, Bioenergy

Story Tips From the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, December 2016

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Almeria Analytics adds a capability with ORNL technology; Wireless sensor network provides insight into population density, movement; New ORNL technology quickly detects cracks in walls, roofs; ORNL motor boasts 75 percent power gain over competing designs; New microscopy technique features unprecedented resolution; Livestock feed gets a bioenergy boost

Science

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Tornado, Thunderstorms, Weather, Climate Change, Outbreaks, Meteorological, Insurance, wind shear

Increasing Tornado Outbreaks—Is Climate Change Responsible?

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In a new study, Columbia Engineering researchers looked at increasing trends in the severity of tornado outbreaks where they measured severity by the number of tornadoes per outbreak. They found that these trends are increasing fastest for the most extreme outbreaks.

Science

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Atmospheric Science, Weather, Thunderstorms, Climate Modeling, Great Plains, Midwest, Rain, Precipitation

Where the Rains Come From

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Intense storms have become more frequent and longer-lasting in the Great Plains and Midwest in the last 35 years. What has fueled these storms? The temperature difference between the Southern Great Plains and the Atlantic Ocean produces winds that carry moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Plains, according to a new study in Nature Communications.

Science

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Climate Change, Flood Control, flood barriers, Sea Level Rising, Infrastructure, Hurricane, Nor'easter, Global Warming, Urban Planning, Concrete, Natural Disaster

Telescopic Walls Could Rise on Demand to Stop Flood Waters

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An University at Buffalo PhD student received a $225,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a system of telescoping concrete boxes to be used as “rise on demand” flood walls. The walls can be installed below ground level, so as not to block any water views, and can be raised when the threat of flooding occurs.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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coastal storms, , Hurricanes, Hurricane Preparedness, disaster resilience, hurricane damage, Natural Disasters, disaster risk assessment, disaster risk management, disaster risk preparedness, stakeholder involvement, involving stakeholders in disaster planning

Study Offers Coastal Communities Better Way to Prepare for Devastating Storms

With massive coastal storms on the rise, a new study describes a method for stakeholders in vulnerable communities to be involved in preparing for, absorbing, recovering and adapting from devastation.

Science

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Geography, Disaster Response, Geographic Information Systems

UT Professor Develops Algorithm to Improve Online Mapping of Disaster Areas

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Yingjie Hu, UT assistant professor of geography, has developed an algorithm to improve online mapping of disaster areas.

Science

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earthquake in Japan, earthquake planning, Earthquake

New Early Warning Systems Gave Residents of Fukushima Ample Time to Seek Safety, According to Virginia Tech Expert

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Science

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Storm Forecasts, Lightning, Weather, GOES-R, weather forecasting

How Lightning Strikes Can Improve Storm Forecasts

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Research shows that real-time lightning observations could significantly improve forecasts of large storm events.

Science

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Climate Change, Natural Hazards, bushfire, heatwave

Increasing Cost of Natural Hazards as Climate Changes

A new comprehensive study of Australian natural hazards paints a picture of increasing heatwaves and extreme bushfires as this century progresses, but with much more uncertainty about the future of storms and rainfall.

Science

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Climate, Hurricane, Robert Korty, Pliocene Epoch, Texas A&M University

Hurricanes From 3 Million Years Ago Give Us Clues About Present Storms

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Studying hurricane and tropical storm development from three million years ago might give today’s forecasters a good blueprint for 21st century storms, says a team of international researchers that includes a Texas A&M University atmospheric sciences professor.







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