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Medicine

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short-term memory, Rutishauser, Mamelak, Memory Disorders

Cedars-Sinai Investigators Identify Human Brain Processes Critical to Short-Term Memory

Cedars-Sinai neuroscientists have uncovered processes involved in how the human brain creates and maintains short-term memories. This study is the first clear demonstration of precisely how human brain cells work to create and recall short-term memories. Confirmation of this process and the specific brain regions involved is a critical step in developing meaningful treatments for memory disorders that affect millions of Americans.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Momentary Attention Switching Easily Causes Pilot Errors, Like Alleged Harrison Ford Runway Mix-Up

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Experts on aviation and perception, Stephen Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde comment on the factors that can lead to pilot errors, such as the reported incident involving actor Harrison Ford landing his plane in close brush with a 737 at John Wayne Airport on Wednesday.

Life

Education

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childhood literacy

Dr. Seuss and Literacy: DePaul University Expert Offers Tips to Keep Reading Fun for Children, Reflects on 60 Years of ‘the Cat in the Hat’

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Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Emotions Are Cognitive, Not Innate, Researchers Conclude

Emotions are not innately programmed into our brains, but, in fact, are cognitive states resulting from the gathering of information, New York University Professor Joseph LeDoux and Richard Brown, a professor at the City University of New York, conclude.

Science

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compulsory moral assessment, University of Vienna, optimal theory of the evolution of reputation-based cooperation, Game Theory, Evolutionary, scientific reports, sanctioning wrongdoers, "good" and "bad", game-theoretical analysis, Artificial Intelligence

More Order with Less Judgement: An Optimal Theory of the Evolution of Cooperation

A research team led by Mathematician Tatsuya Sasaki from the University of Vienna presents a new optimal theory of the evolution of reputation-based cooperation. This team proves that the practice of making moral assessments conditionally is very effective in establishing cooperation in terms of evolutionary game theory. "Our study also demonstrates the evolutionary disadvantage of seeking reputation by sanctioning wrongdoers," says Sasaki. The results of the study were published on the in Scientific Reports.

Medicine

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Gene Therapy, Hearing Loss, Genetic Deafness, Usher Syndrome, vector drug delivery

Gene Therapy Restores Hearing in Deaf Mice… Down to a Whisper

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In the summer of 2015, a team at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School reported restoring rudimentary hearing in genetically deaf mice using gene therapy. Now the Boston Children’s research team reports restoring a much higher level of hearing — down to 25 decibels, the equivalent of a whisper — using an improved gene therapy vector developed at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. The new vector and the mouse studies are described in two back-to-back papers in Nature Biotechnology (published online February 6).

Medicine

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concussion and soccer ball heading, concussion and heading, concussion and soccer, Concussion, head impacts and soccer ball heading, Traumatic Head Injury

Soccer Ball Heading May Commonly Cause Concussion Symptoms

Frequent soccer ball heading is a common and under recognized cause of concussion symptoms, according to a study of amateur players led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers. The findings run counter to earlier soccer studies suggesting concussion injuries mainly result from inadvertent head impacts, such as collisions with other players or a goalpost. The study was published online today in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

Science

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locked-in syndrome, Computer Interface, Brain

Brain-Computer Interface Allows Completely Locked-in People to Communicate

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Completely locked-in participants report being “happy”

Medicine

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Levo System, Otoharmonics, Tinnitus, hearing disorders, Ear And Hearing, Ringing In The Ears, Veterans

New Technology Alleviates Tinnitus by Retraining the Brain to Ignore Ringing in the Ears

Tinnitus -- "ringing in the ears" -- affects an estimated 50 million Americans and is the leading service-related disability among U.S. veterans. Until recently, very little could be done for sufferers, but now a new, FDA-approved technology is successfully treating it. The Levo System mimics the buzzing, hissing, whistling or clicking sounds that many tinnitus sufferers describe and "trains" the brain to ignore them, thereby alleviating the condition entirely. To do this, patients wear earbuds at night while sleeping, when the brain is most responsive to sensory input.

Medicine

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Fragile X Syndrome

New TSRI Study Shows Early Brain Changes in Fragile X Syndrome

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A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is giving researchers a first look at the early stages of brain development in patients with Fragile X syndrome, a disorder that causes mild to severe intellectual disability and is the most common genetic cause of autism spectrum disorder.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's, Mayo Clinic Study on Aging, Yonas Geda, Research

Mayo Clinic Researchers Find Mental Activities May Protect Against Mild Cognitive Impairment

PHOENIX – Mayo Clinic researchers have found that engaging in mentally stimulating activities, even late in life, may protect against new-onset mild cognitive impairment, which is the intermediate stage between normal cognitive aging and dementia. The study found that cognitively normal people 70 or older who engaged in computer use, craft activities, social activities and playing games had a decreased risk of developing mild cognitive impairment. The results are published in the Jan. 30 edition of JAMA Neurology.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Children, Psychology, Learning, Brain, Science

Kids Should Pay More Attention to Mistakes, Study Suggests

Children who believe intelligence can grow pay more attention to and bounce back from their mistakes more effectively than kids who think intelligence is fixed, indicates a new study that measured the young participants’ brain waves.

Medicine

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Gene-delivery Therapy, Hearing, DEAF, Genetic form of deafness, Inner ear hair cells, Missing gene in hearing, Gene Therapy, Hair Cells, Hard Of Hearing, partial hearing loss, Hearing Loss, Restoring Hearing, Hearing Impairment, Exosomes, exo-AAV, Restoring hearing in mice

A Better Carrier

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• Harvard Medical School scientists and colleagues from the Massachusetts General Hospital have partly restored hearing in mice with a genetic form of deafness. • Scientists altered a common virus, enhancing its ability to enter hair cells in the inner ear that are critical for hearing and to deliver a missing gene essential for hearing and balance. • The new approach overcomes a longstanding barrier to gene therapy for inherited and acquired deafness.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Stereotypes About “Brilliance” Affect Girls’ Interests as Early as Age 6, New Study Finds

By the age of 6, girls become less likely than boys to associate brilliance with their own gender and are more likely to avoid activities said to require brilliance, shows a new study conducted by researchers at New York University, the University of Illinois, and Princeton University.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Prof. Tamar Shochat, University Of Haifa, Sleep, Creativity, Neta Ram-Vlasov

Creative People Sleep More, Later, and Less Well

The study compared art students and social science students. The finding: art student sleep more hours, but reported more sleep disturbance and daytime dysfunction

Medicine

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Drugs, Teenagers, Cannabis, Brain, cognitive abilities, Quebec, University of Montreal, Psychoeducation

Delaying Pot Smoking to Age 17 Is Better for Teens' Brains, a New Study Suggests

Adolescents who smoke marijuana as early as 14 do worse by 20 on some cognitive tests and drop out of school at a higher rate than non-smokers. But if they hold off until age 17, they're less at risk.

Medicine

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U Study: Law Aiding Infants at Risk for Hearing Loss

The study, published Jan. 24, 2017, in Pediatrics, is the first to assess how implementation of a state-wide screening can pick up hearing loss in infants due to congenital cytomegalovirus.

Medicine

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Cognitive Decline, SWAN, Women's Health, Menopause

Women’s Cognitive Decline Begins Earlier Than Previously Believed

Mental sharpness in women begins to decline as early as their 50s. Cognitive processing speed, which includes speed of perception and reaction, showed an average decline of around 1 percent every two years and verbal memory declined on average around 1 percent every five years.

Medicine

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Northwestern University, Northwestern Medicine, Brain

Brain Stimulation Used Like a Scalpel to Improve Memory

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Northwestern Medicine scientists showed for the first time that non-invasive brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel, rather than like a hammer, to cause a specific improvement in precise memory.Precise memory, rather than general memory, is critical for knowing details such as the specific color, shape and location of a building you are looking for, rather than simply knowing the part of town it’s in.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Brain Development, Language and music, Cognitive Abilities, Brain Skills, pitch perception, Tone Language

Mandarin Makes You More Musical?

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Mandarin makes you more musical – and at a much earlier age than previously thought. That’s the suggestion of a new study from the University of California San Diego. But hold on there, overachiever parents, don’t’ rush just yet to sign your kids up for Chinese lessons instead of piano.







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