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Can Parents Make Their Kids Smarter?

Florida State University criminology professor Kevin Beaver examined a nationally representative sample of youth alongside a sample of adopted children from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) and found evidence to support the argument that IQ is not the result of parental socialization.

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Liberal or Conservative? Brain Responses to Disgusting Images Help Reveal Political Leanings

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An team of scientists led by Virginia Tech reports that the strength of a person’s reaction to repulsive images can forecast their political ideology. The brain’s response to a single disgusting image was enough to predict an individual’s political ideology.

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Strong Bonds with Pets May Help Foster Resiliency in Military-Connected Children

Developing resiliency has important benefits for children, especially those from military families faced with significant challenges such as parental deployment and frequent moves. New Tufts University research published online in Applied Developmental Science supports the idea that, along with other key resources, strong attachments to animals may help military-connected children develop resiliency and other positive developmental traits.

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Whites of Their Eyes: Study Finds Infants Respond to Social Cues From Sclera

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Infants at 7 months old are able to unconsciously pick up on eye cues, based on the size of the whites of a person’s eyes – a vital foundation for the development of social interactive skills, a new U.Va. psychology study shows.

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Reminiscing Can Help Boost Mental Performance

New research led by Cornell University neuroscientist Nathan Spreng shows for the first time that engaging brain areas linked to so-called “off-task” mental activities (such as mind-wandering and reminiscing) can actually boost performance on some challenging mental tasks. The results advance our understanding of how externally and internally focused neural networks interact to facilitate complex thought, the authors say.

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Mathematical Model Shows How the Brain Remains Stable During Learning

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, UC San Francisco (UCSF), and Columbia University in New York.

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Memory Decline Among Menopausal Women Could Be Next Research Frontier for Hypnotic Relaxation Therapy

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Memory decline — a frequent complaint of menopausal women — potentially could be lessened by hypnotic relaxation therapy, say Baylor University researchers, who already have done studies showing that such therapy eases hot flashes, improves sleep and reduces stress in menopausal women.

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Stony Brook Professor Leads World’s Largest Medical Study on the State of Mind and Consciousness at the Time of Death

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The results of a four-year international study of 2,060 cardiac arrest cases across 15 hospitals worldwide concluded that there is a unique experience of death for humans that appears far broader than what has been referred to as so called near-death experiences (NDEs). Dr. Sam Parnia, Assistant Professor of Critical Care Medicine and Director of Resuscitation Research at Stony Brook Medicine is lead author of the study, which is published in the journal Resuscitation.

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Deficits in Tactile-Based Learning Linked to Fragile X Syndrome

Researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have described for the first time a specific perceptual learning deficit in mice with a mutation of the same gene as found in children with Fragile X Syndrome (FXS).

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Toddlers Regulate Behavior to Avoid Making Adults Angry

Researchers at the University of Washington have found that children as young as 15 months can detect anger when watching other people's social interactions and then use that emotional information to guide their own behavior.

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