Feature Channels

Cognition and Learning

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Crows Are Smarter Than You Think

A newly published study involving the University of Iowa finds crows have the brain power to solve higher‐order, relational‐matching tasks, and they can do so spontaneously. That means crows join humans, apes and monkeys in exhibiting advanced relational thinking, according to the research.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Mild Memory & Thinking Issues: What Works, What Doesn’t? U-M Experts Weigh the Evidence

For up to one in five Americans over age 65, getting older brings memory and thinking problems. It may seem like part of getting older - but officially, it’s called mild cognitive impairment or MCI. A new definitive look at the evidence about what works and what doesn’t in MCI should help doctors and the seniors they treat.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Benefits of Naming People, Objects in Baby’s First Year

lscott.jpg

In a follow-up to earlier studies of learning in infancy, researchers report that talking to babies in their first year, in particular naming things and people, helps them connect what they see and hear. This learning between 6 and 9 months aids later learning and is evident years later.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Paying Attention Makes Touch-Sensing Brain Cells Fire Rapidly and in Sync

Whether we’re paying attention to something we see can be discerned by monitoring the firings of specific groups of brain cells. Now, new work from Johns Hopkins shows that the same holds true for the sense of touch. The study brings researchers closer to understanding how animals’ thoughts and feelings affect their perception of external stimuli.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Scientists Shed New Light on How Bad Experiences Change the Brain to Produce Memories

We know that everyday events can be easy to forget, but dangerous experiences that trigger fear can remain engraved in the brain for years. Now, scientists from NYU and Japan’s RIKEN Brain Science Institute have added to our understanding how this occurs.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Punishing Kids for Lying Just Doesn’t Work

If you want your child to tell the truth, it’s best not to threaten to punish them if they lie. That’s what researchers discovered through a simple experiment involving 372 children between the ages of 4 and 8.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Diabetes in Midlife Linked to Significant Cognitive Decline 20 Years Later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife are more likely to experience significant memory and cognitive problems during the next 20 years than those with healthy blood sugar levels, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Pleasure at Another’s Misfortune Is Evident in Children as Young as Two

Even very young children will show signs of schadenfreude when an inequitable situation is rectified.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

From Architect to Social Worker: Complex Jobs May Protect Memory and Thinking Later in Life

People whose jobs require more complex work with other people, such as social workers and lawyers, or with data, like architects or graphic designers, may end up having longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities compared to people who do less complex work, according to research published in the November 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

A Mother's Soothing Presence Makes Pain Go Away – and Changes Gene Activity in the Infant Brain

A mother’s “TLC” not only can help soothe pain in infants, but it may also impact early brain development by altering gene activity in a part of the brain involved in emotions, according to new study from NYU Langone Medical Center.

View | Comment