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Evolution and Darwin

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Science

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Dinosaur, Tyrannasaurus Rex, Evolution, Paleontology, Proteins

What Can We Learn from Dinosaur Proteins?

Researchers recently confirmed it is possible to extract proteins from 80-million-year-old dinosaur bones. The discovery sparks hopes for new insights about evolution and environmental change and could even offer useful clues for drug discovery or the search for extraterrestrial life.

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Evolution, Neurobiology, Brain, touch research, Animal Behavior

Totally Bizarre Facts About the Star-Nosed Mole

In a new synthesis of anatomy research, scientists showcase the surprising, record-breaking and just plain weird adaptations of the star-nosed mole. The animal eats faster and sports a more sensitive touch organ than any other mammal, is the first mammal known to smell underwater and offers fascinating insights about the brain-body interface.

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Life

Law and Public Policy

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Honeybees in Danger, Man-Eating Lions of Tsavo, Panamanian Golden Frogs, Giant Sulfur-Powered Shipworms, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on ecology and wildlife.

Science

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Collagen, animal kingdom, Sponges, ctenophore

Vanderbilt Research Unlocks Molecular Key to Animal Evolution and Disease

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The dawn of the Animal Kingdom began with a collagen scaffold that enabled the organization of cells into tissues.

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Megafauna, Extinction, Ancient Dna, Ice Age, Evolution, Climate Change

Megafaunal Extinctions Driven by Too Much Moisture

Studies of bones from Ice Age megafaunal animals across Eurasia and the Americas have revealed that major increases in environmental moisture occurred just before many species suddenly became extinct around 11-15,000 years ago. The persistent moisture resulting from melting permafrost and glaciers caused widespread glacial-age grasslands to be rapidly replaced by peatlands and bogs, fragmenting populations of large herbivore grazers.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Emotions, Darwin, Eyes, Facial Expression, Evolution, Human Behavior

Eye Expressions Offer a Glimpse Into the Evolution of Emotion

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New research by Adam Anderson, professor of human development at Cornell University’s College of Human Ecology, reveals why the eyes offer a window into the soul. According to the recent study, in Psychological Science, we interpret a person’s emotions by analyzing the expression in their eyes – a process that began as a universal reaction to environmental stimuli and evolved to communicate our deepest emotions.

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Cave-In: How Blind Species Evolve

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Why do animals that live in caves become blind? Charles Darwin originally suggested that eyes could be lost by “disuse” over time. Now, Reed Cartwright, an ASU evolutionary biologist in the School of Life Sciences and researcher at the Biodesign Institute, wants to get to the heart of the matter—and in a recent publication in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, may be proving Darwin wrong.

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Species, Reptile, Fossil, Ancient, Dinosaur, Crocodile, University of Birmingham

Discovery of Early, ‘Croc-Like’ Reptile Sheds New Light on Evolution of Dinosaurs

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A new species of ancient reptile has been described by scientists at the University of Birmingham, filling a critical gap in the fossil record of dinosaur cousins and suggesting that some features thought to characterise dinosaurs evolved much earlier than previously thought.

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Biology, Evolution, Paleontology

Virginia Tech Scientists Discover Early Dinosaur Cousin Had a Surprising Croc-Like Look

A Virginia Tech paleobiologist's latest discovery of Teleocrater rhadinus has overturned popular predictions.

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Evolution, fish, Marine Biology, Nervous System, sensory system

As Fins Evolve to Help Fish Swim, So Does the Nervous System

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The sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish’s swimming behavior, according to new research from the University of Chicago. The researchers found these parallels across a wide range of fish species, suggesting that it may occur in other animals as well.







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