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Evolution and Darwin

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Science

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A Quark Like No Other, Biophysics Plays Key Role in Immune System Signaling and Response, ALMA Reveals Sun in New Light, and MORE in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

Medicine

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Social Environment, Health, mice

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Jan-2017 2:00 PM EST

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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One Night Stand Regrets

How we feel after 1-night stands has a lot to do with our gender -- and evolution.

Science

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Discovery Adds Rock Collecting to Neanderthal's Repertoire

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Interesting limestone rock found at Croatian Neanderthal site

Science

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Anthropology, acheology, Bering Strait, human settlements, Yukon, Radiocarbon, PLoS ONE, Montreal

The First Humans Arrived in North America a Lot Earlier Than Believed

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Anthropologists at Université de Montréal have dated the oldest human settlement in Canada back 10,000 years.

Science

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Biology, Genetics, Evolution, Fruit Flies

Scientists Engineer Animals with Ancient Genes to Test Causes of Evolution

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Scientists at the University of Chicago have created the first genetically modified animals containing reconstructed ancient genes, which they used to test the evolutionary effects of genetic changes that happened in the deep past on the animals’ biology and fitness.

Medicine

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Mapping Movements of Alien Bird Species

The global map of alien bird species has been produced for the first time by a UCL-led team of researchers. It shows that human activities are the main determinants of how many alien bird species live in an area but that alien species are most successful in areas already rich with native bird species.

Medicine

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Arctic, Aboriginal Peoples, Diet, mercury exposure, Microbiome, Canada, evolutionary biologist, Biology, Montreal, Nunavut, Indigenous, hunter-gatherer, Sea, DNA

Meet Canada's "Poop Lady"

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Since 2012, UdeM PhD student Catherine Girard has collected stool samples from the Inuit of Nunavut. In a new study, she documents for the first time their "gut microbiome" – with surprising results.

Science

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Evolution, Teeth, Fossils, Homonin

What Teeth Reveal About the Lives of Modern Humans

When anthropologists of the future find our fossilized teeth, what will they be able to conclude about our lives?Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg has an idea.

Medicine

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While Not Necessarily Reality, Perception Can Cause Reality to Evolve

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In a perspective published January 6, 2017, in Science, Hamilton Farris, PhD, Associate Professor-Research at LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence, finds that the key insight of an important study is that perception can drive the evolution of observable traits.

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Dinosaur Eggs Took a Long Time to Hatch; This May Have Contributed to Their Doom

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New research on the teeth of fossilized dinosaur embryos indicates that the eggs of non-avian dinosaurs took a long time to hatch--between about three and six months.

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anole, adaptive radiation, developmental monitoring

Sticky Toes Provide Clues to Evolution

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Yet, how this key innovation evolved remains a mystery locked within the leathery shell of a lizard egg. Now, Dr. Thomas Sanger at Loyola University in Chicago has developed new techniques to understand more about the process of evolutionary diversification by observing development in real time.

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Toads

The Mystery of the Earless Toads

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More than 200 species of “true toads” have fully functional inner ears, but cannot fully use them because they have lost their tympanic middle ears, the part of the ear which transmits sound air pressures from the outside world to the inner ear. These “earless” toads rely on sounds to communicate, so why would they lose a sense that is key to their survival and reproduction?

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Big Data Shows How What We Buy Affects Endangered Species

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The things we consume, from iPhones to cars to IKEA furniture, have costs that go well beyond their purchase price. What if the soybeans used to make that tofu you ate last night were grown in fields that were hewn out of tropical rainforests? Or if that tee-shirt you bought came from an industrial area that had been carved out of high-value habitat in Malaysia?

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Research on Dinosaur Embryos Reveals That Eggs Took 3 to 6 Months to Hatch

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New research on the teeth of fossilized dinosaur embryos indicates that the eggs of non-avian dinosaurs took a long time to hatch--between about three and six months.

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University of Washington-Led Study Shows New Global Evidence of the Role of Humans, Urbanization in Rapid Evolution

It has long been suspected that humans and the urban areas we create are having an important — and surprisingly current and ongoing — effect on evolution, which may have significant implications for the sustainability of global ecosystems. A new multi-institution study led by the University of Washington that examines 1,600 global instances of phenotypic change — alterations to species' observable traits such as size, development or behavior — shows more clearly than ever that urbanization is affecting the genetic makeup of species that are crucial to ecosystem health and success.

Science

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Dinosaurs, Embryology, Reproduction, Extinction

How Long Did It Take to Hatch a Dinosaur Egg? FSU Research Says 3-6 Months

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How long did it take for dinosaur eggs to incubate? Groundbreaking research led by Florida State University establishes a timeline of three to six months.

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Genome Study Reveals Widespread “Gray Zone” of Animals Transitioning From One Species to Two

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New research publishing December 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology characterizes the ability of populations to interbreed and exchange genes as a function of the level divergence of their genomes.

Science

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Evolution, Histology, Paleontology, Biology, aerobic capacity, Dinosaurs, archosaurs, Mammals, mammals and birds, Birds, Fossils

Biologists Follow ‘Fossilizable’ Clues to Pinpoint When Mammal, Bird and Dinosaur Ancestors Became Athletes

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The study is the first to draw a link between RBC size and microscopic traces of blood vessels and bone cells inside bones. They found that extinct mammal and bird relatives had smaller RBCs and were likely better athletes than earlier terrestrial vertebrates. The timing of RBC-size reduction coincided with Earth's greatest mass extinction 252 mya.

Science

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Evolution, Earth Science, Earth Science (Hydrology/Water Resources, Oceanography), earth and planetary sciences, exoplanetary atmospheres, exoplanetary oceans, Cyanobacteria, Photosynthesis, Animal, Shale, Phosphorus, fe, iron, Nutrient, Proterozoic Eon, Chris Reinhard, Noah Planavsky, Georgia Insitute of Technology, Yale University

A Fertilizer Dearth Foiled Animal Evolution for Eons?

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Earth was inhospitable to complex life for billions of years, suffocating evolution in a nearly oxygen-free environment. Then came a shift in phosphorus concentrations to ocean shallows, and shortly after it, complex life exploded.







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